• With one wrecked, and another aging, county considering single aircraft

    CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE – The County Freeholders voted this week to accept an $80,000 insurance settlement for a county helicopter that crashed last month, an official said Wednesday, however the county is unlikely to replace the aircraft.

    “We have two helicopters,” said Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton. “We’re discussing just going to one helicopter, and replacing the one we have.”

  • Jacob SpiegelWILDWOOD — An official with the Wildwood fire department says that Jake Spiegel, the part-time firefighter who was indicted by a grand jury Sept. 24 with his father, Rob, on official misconduct charges, is not currently working for the department.

    As a part-time firefighter, Jake Spiegel is a summer employee for the city of Wildwood, said Deputy Fire Chief Dan Speigel (no relation to the accused). The department is “monitoring the situation” to determine at a later date if Spiegel can return to work next summer.

  • WILDWOOD — Officials in Wildwood decided Wednesday to keep the city’s curfew in place, unlike other New Jersey towns that have opted to repeal theirs after courts found them to be unconstitutional.

    Instead, they asked city attorney Mary D’Arcy Bittner to revise the curfew to protect Wildwood against possible lawsuits.

  • Jacob Spiegel, left, and former Seaville fire chief Rob Spiegel, right, were indicted Wednesday.TRENTON – Acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman said Wednesday that the former chief of the Seaville Volunteer Fire and Rescue Company and his son have been indicted for allegedly receiving payments of approximately $46,000 based on fraudulent invoices and receipts they submitted for reimbursement to the fire company and Fire District No. 4 commissioners.

    Eugene “Rob” Spiegel, 51, and Jacob Spiegel, 20, both of Seaville, were indicted by…

  • Performers from Dance Dynamics and Dancers Two dazzled the crowd during the 2013 Harvest Festival.CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE – Harvest Festival is just a month away, and this year could be the township’s largest fall celebration ever, township officials said recently.

    [photos courtesy of Middle Township]

Stone Harbor kicks off its beach project

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Beaches will be closed a couple of blocks at a time as a beach project pumps sand onto storm-damaged Stone Harbor beaches. The total cost for the project is expected to top $5 million, mostly funded by the Army Corps of Engineers.  Beaches will be closed a couple of blocks at a time as a beach project pumps sand onto storm-damaged Stone Harbor beaches. The total cost for the project is expected to top $5 million, mostly funded by the Army Corps of Engineers.

STONE HARBOR – Officials at the local, state and federal level gathered at a gazebo at 101st Street Friday to announce the start of a multimillion-dollar beach replenishment project, which will add sand from 123rd Street to 80th street.

The dredge has recently completed adding sand to Avalon beaches, and the two projects were combined to reduce start-up costs.

According to borough officials, the project will work its way north two blocks at a time, pumping 580,000 cubic yards of sand from an offshore dredge over more than four miles of beach. The project is also set to include more than two miles of new seawall and restoration of natural habitat at Stone Harbor Point.

The total cost of the project is $5 million, but because much of the project is repairing storm damage, the federal government is paying most of that, along with a state contribution from the Department of Environmental Protection. Stone Harbor is paying a total of $121,000 for its share of the project, according to Mayor Suzanne Walters.

“This is an example of government cooperation at its very best,” Walters said. “The federal, state and local governments have worked together on this effort to provide a protective and recreational beach for Stone Harbor for the summer season.”

She said the work will protect more than $4 billion worth of real estate in Stone Harbor from future storms.

According to Walters, some property owners weren’t happy that the work continued through the Memorial Day weekend, but she said once the project starts, the work continues 24 hours a day.

“They can’t just take a weekend off,” she said.

The beaches a few blocks around the project area will be closed, but will open again as the work moves north, according to officials.

Sandy Slabik, a resident and the president of the taxpayer group Stone Harbor Realty Owners Association, asked for details of how owners can get updates on the work, and which beaches are closed. She was directed to Channel 2 and the borough radio station at 1670 AM. She asked where those out of the area could go, and borough officials said they would try to post updates at the borough website, www.stone-harbor.nj.us.

As of this week, there was an update on the project posted on the site, indicating that the beaches from 101st Street to 105th Street were closed.

The work is being completed by Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company of Illinois, under a contract with the Army Corps of Engineers. The state Department of Environmental Protection is the nonfederal sponsor of the project.

The press conference drew print reporters from most of the papers in the county, and representatives of several television stations. Toward the end, there was also a line of children and their families at the street end stairway, waiting to get by to hit the sunny beach.

Keith Watson with the Army Corps of Engineers discusses the scope of the work. Keith Watson with the Army Corps of Engineers discusses the scope of the work.

Lifeguards keep an eye on the few young bathers to brave the chilly water on Friday. Nearby, heavy equipment works on a beach building project, but most beaches will remain open through the work. Lifeguards keep an eye on the few young bathers to brave the chilly water on Friday. Nearby, heavy equipment works on a beach building project, but most beaches will remain open through the work.


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