• Two Pleasantville men were shot Monday, Oct. 20 when the vehicle they were sitting in was riddled by 15-20 rounds of gunfire, according to Pleasantville Police.PLEASANTVILLE - Two Pleasantville men were shot Monday, Oct. 20 when the vehicle they were sitting in was riddled by 15-20 rounds of gunfire, according to Pleasantville Police.

  • Photo by Christie Rotondo/Former Mayor Bill Henfey, left, and current Mayor Patrick Rosenello, right, at Henfey's last meeting in December 2013. NORTH WILDWOOD — Bill Henfey, who served as North Wildwood’s mayor from 2006 to 2013, died Tuesday morning surrounded by family and friends at his home, the city of North Wildwood announced.

    He was 65.

  • Local and county officials attended the ribbon cutting of the Volunteers in Medicine Thrift Store in Cape May Court House, at 10 a.m., Saturday. Oct. 18.CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE – Shoppers waited patiently outside the doors of the township’s newest store, Saturday, Oct. 18, as local and officials cut the ribbon to open the Volunteers in Medicine thrift store at 20 S. Main St.

  • CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE – Demands by state, county and municipal officials for a second look at controversial affordable housing project at Patsy’s Way have halted the project – at least temporarily – while the governor’s office examines the proposal, a local official said recently.

    According to Middle Township Mayor Tim Donohue, the state Department of Community Affairs was set to petition HUD for the release of nearly $2 million on Friday, Oct. 10 to begin the project.

  • DENNIS TOWNSHIP – The board of education has two vacancies that came too late to place on the November ballot, and those positions will be filled after the general election on Nov. 4.

    “We had two board members resign – one in September and one last night (Oct. 15),” said Mia DelCorio, secretary to the business administrator. “Since it was so late, we couldn’t get the positions on the ballot.”

Stone Harbor kicks off its beach project

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Beaches will be closed a couple of blocks at a time as a beach project pumps sand onto storm-damaged Stone Harbor beaches. The total cost for the project is expected to top $5 million, mostly funded by the Army Corps of Engineers.  Beaches will be closed a couple of blocks at a time as a beach project pumps sand onto storm-damaged Stone Harbor beaches. The total cost for the project is expected to top $5 million, mostly funded by the Army Corps of Engineers.

STONE HARBOR – Officials at the local, state and federal level gathered at a gazebo at 101st Street Friday to announce the start of a multimillion-dollar beach replenishment project, which will add sand from 123rd Street to 80th street.

The dredge has recently completed adding sand to Avalon beaches, and the two projects were combined to reduce start-up costs.

According to borough officials, the project will work its way north two blocks at a time, pumping 580,000 cubic yards of sand from an offshore dredge over more than four miles of beach. The project is also set to include more than two miles of new seawall and restoration of natural habitat at Stone Harbor Point.

The total cost of the project is $5 million, but because much of the project is repairing storm damage, the federal government is paying most of that, along with a state contribution from the Department of Environmental Protection. Stone Harbor is paying a total of $121,000 for its share of the project, according to Mayor Suzanne Walters.

“This is an example of government cooperation at its very best,” Walters said. “The federal, state and local governments have worked together on this effort to provide a protective and recreational beach for Stone Harbor for the summer season.”

She said the work will protect more than $4 billion worth of real estate in Stone Harbor from future storms.

According to Walters, some property owners weren’t happy that the work continued through the Memorial Day weekend, but she said once the project starts, the work continues 24 hours a day.

“They can’t just take a weekend off,” she said.

The beaches a few blocks around the project area will be closed, but will open again as the work moves north, according to officials.

Sandy Slabik, a resident and the president of the taxpayer group Stone Harbor Realty Owners Association, asked for details of how owners can get updates on the work, and which beaches are closed. She was directed to Channel 2 and the borough radio station at 1670 AM. She asked where those out of the area could go, and borough officials said they would try to post updates at the borough website, www.stone-harbor.nj.us.

As of this week, there was an update on the project posted on the site, indicating that the beaches from 101st Street to 105th Street were closed.

The work is being completed by Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company of Illinois, under a contract with the Army Corps of Engineers. The state Department of Environmental Protection is the nonfederal sponsor of the project.

The press conference drew print reporters from most of the papers in the county, and representatives of several television stations. Toward the end, there was also a line of children and their families at the street end stairway, waiting to get by to hit the sunny beach.

Keith Watson with the Army Corps of Engineers discusses the scope of the work. Keith Watson with the Army Corps of Engineers discusses the scope of the work.

Lifeguards keep an eye on the few young bathers to brave the chilly water on Friday. Nearby, heavy equipment works on a beach building project, but most beaches will remain open through the work. Lifeguards keep an eye on the few young bathers to brave the chilly water on Friday. Nearby, heavy equipment works on a beach building project, but most beaches will remain open through the work.


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