Cape May Gazette

Church youth group leader charged with aggravated sexual assault in Lower Township

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Written by Staff Reports Monday, March 24, 2014 04:26 pm

LOWER TOWNSHIP – The Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office and Lower Township police have charged a church youth group leader with aggravated sexual assault of a 14-year-old girl.

Jonatan Nunez, 24, of Vineland, was charged in connection with the March 19 assault, police said.

Read more: Church youth group leader charged with aggravated sexual assault in Lower Township

 

Former Shelton College building to be demolished after roof collapse

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Written by Alex Davis Monday, March 24, 2014 03:32 pm

CAPE MAY — The former Shelton College building will be demolished after the roof collapsed about four weeks ago, according to Cape May City Manager Bruce MacLeod.

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October test found bacteria in Cape May drinking water, says annual report

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Written by Alex Davis Monday, March 24, 2014 03:18 pm

CAPE MAY — In October, the Cape May City Water Department found total coliform bacteria in a sampling of drinking water.

Staff did more testing and those results came back negative, according to a recently released 2013 annual drinking water quality report.

Carl Behrens, superintendent of Cape May’s water and sewer utility, said there’s no cause for alarm. The water is safe to drink, he said.

More than 4,500 customers in Cape May, West Cape May and Cape May Point are serviced by the water utility.

Read more: October test found bacteria in Cape May drinking water, says annual report

 

Bizarre History: Tourists weren't fooled by cold snap on April 1, 1923

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Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Saturday, March 22, 2014 12:00 am

It’s common during Easter time that tourism officials sit back and take a look at what has been, at what is now and at what they hope will be.

Easter, of course, is not the official opening of the tourism season. Some designate the grand opening as Memorial Day and others say it is the Fourth of July. There are still others who contend there is no such thing because Cape May County is open for tourism much of the year; well, maybe not in January when many locals evacuate to Florida.

Read more: Bizarre History: Tourists weren't fooled by cold snap on April 1, 1923

   

Council approves ‘event houses’ regulations in Cape May

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Written by Alex Davis Wednesday, March 19, 2014 01:36 pm

CAPE MAY — City council on Tuesday approved regulating large gatherings like receptions and graduation parties at rentable properties in Cape May.

Mayor Edward J. Mahaney Jr. said complaints with the large gatherings at certain properties, also known as event houses, arose in the last 2-3 years. 

Read more: Council approves ‘event houses’ regulations in Cape May

 

BL England pipeline could be used to export natural gas

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Written by Staff Reports Wednesday, March 19, 2014 12:30 pm

To the editor:

Converting the BL England power plant in Beesleys Point from coal and oil fired to natural gas is a positive move, the environmental consequences notwithstanding.

Relative to what we are now witnessing in Russia and Ukraine, we have international implications. President Vladimir Putin has a vast supply of natural gas and has customers in most of western Europe. The United States also has a large supply of natural gas with a massive distribution system servicing our country. But we are worlds apart from Europe geographically.

Read more: BL England pipeline could be used to export natural gas

   

Cape May approves free beach tags for veterans

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Written by Alex Davis Wednesday, March 19, 2014 11:20 am

CAPE MAY — Veterans and active military personnel and their families will get free beach tags in Cape May this summer.

Cape May government Tuesday night became the latest in the state to approve such an ordinance during a meeting at City Hall. Gov. Chris Christie signed a law in January that permits beach communities to provide free or reduce fee tags to veterans.

"I think what you're doing is not to save the veterans $20-$30 on a beach tag. It's that veteran who’s walking down the beach 10 years after he gets discharged and says 'Somebody cares,’” said Joe Griffies, a Vietnam veteran of Middle Township.

Read more: Cape May approves free beach tags for veterans

 

Learning starts with breakfast for Cape May students

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Written by Alex Davis Tuesday, March 18, 2014 10:00 pm

Learning starts with breakfast for Cape May students

CAPE MAY — Students don’t start the day in classrooms by opening up textbooks or getting out pencils and paper to take notes at Cape May City Elementary School. They have free breakfast.

On Tuesday morning, Dempsey Ryan, 8, of Cape May, sipped milk from a bowl after eating Cheerios. A partially eaten red apple and a carton of 1 percent lowfat milk were on the table beside her.

Read more: Learning starts with breakfast for Cape May students

   

Proposed Cape May school budget raises taxes 4 percent

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Written by Alex Davis Monday, March 17, 2014 05:19 pm

CAPE MAY — The Cape May school board is proposing to raise taxes by 4 percent in a $3.4 million budget introduced Thursday, March 13.

A property owner whose home is assessed at $500,000 would pay about $13.50 more in taxes next school year.

Read more: Proposed Cape May school budget raises taxes 4 percent

 

No separation between church and state in early Cape May

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Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Sunday, March 16, 2014 01:00 am

The freedoms for which colonists fought in the American Revolution were abused even in religion as far back as 1721 in the territory now known as Cape May, Lower and Middle townships.

People who were non-believers were often scorned and sometimes subjected to physical punishment if they did not abide by the laws of God. There was little separation between church and state then, as shown by the legislature governing this area. It introduced a bill that would punish those who “denied the doctrine of the Trinity, the divinity of Christ, the inspiration of Holy Scriptures, etc.”

Read more: No separation between church and state in early Cape May

   

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