Popular in History

History > Local anthem actually written ‘On The Way To Cape May’

It never won a music award, didn’t even come clo....

History > The big fire: 1878 blaze took 10 Cape May hotels

Church bells rang in Cape May at 7 o’clock on th....

King Nummy sold tribe’s land to settlers, forcing them to move

If you can’t find Thomas Nummie in your history ....

History > Did Lincoln ever visit Cape May?

Some accounts have him making fateful decision at ....

History > Henry Sawyer was unlucky winner of Libby Prison ‘death lottery’

It had been some time since Harriet Ware Sawyer ki....

History > Cape May’s history is a jigsaw puzzle of famous figures

Researching the history of Cape May, like other hi....

Bizarre History: Tourists weren't fooled by cold snap on April 1, 1923

It’s common during Easter time that tourism offi....

History > For Henry Clay, a Cape May vacation was hardly relaxing

Henry Clay sat in his Cape Island vacation quarter....

History > Vacationers have been coming to Cape May since the Revolution

How times have changed at Cape Island that was to ....

No separation between church and state in early Cape May

The freedoms for which colonists fought in the Ame....




Bizarre History of Cape May | Cape May Gazette

The Bizarre History of Cape May with Jacob Schaad Jr.

The Bizarre History of Cape May > Whilldin family had longstanding ties to Cape May

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Wednesday, December 12, 2012 01:00 pm

 The next time you visit Florida, think of the historic Cape May connection if you are in West Palm Beach or Orlando.

The man who brings the communities together was born in Cape May, is a descendant of a Mayflower passenger and went on to become mayor of West Palm Beach in 1898 and 1899. His gravestone in the Woodlawn Cemetery in West Palm Beach also cites him as having been “a pioneer in the upbringing of Orlando and West Palm Beach.”

Read more: The Bizarre History of Cape May > Whilldin family had longstanding ties to Cape May

 

The Bizarre History of Cape May > Strom Thurmond preached anti-communism here in 1980

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Sunday, December 02, 2012 07:46 am

When historians write about the past of Cape Island/Cape May, reference is usually made to the five presidents (six if you count the disputed Abe Lincoln) who vacationed here during their terms of office. They include Franklin Pierce, Ulysses S. Grant, James Buchanan, Chester Arthur and Benjamin Harrison.

Read more: The Bizarre History of Cape May > Strom Thurmond preached anti-communism here in 1980

   

Bizarre History of Cape May >> Cape May hymn writer received popularity but not money

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Thursday, November 22, 2012 12:09 pm

When Christians attend church they have a Cape May native to thank for the lyrics of a gospel hymn that is still among the most popular hymns ever composed.

Edgar Page Stites wrote the words for “Beulah Land” in 1876 and the music was composed by nationally known composer John Sweney.

Read more: Bizarre History of Cape May >> Cape May hymn writer received popularity but not money

 

Bizarre History of Cape May > Cape May congressman witnesses attack on the House firsthand

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Thursday, October 18, 2012 08:14 pm

 When the congressman from Cape May walked into the chamber of the House of Representatives on the afternoon of Monday, March 1, 1954, he expected a lively exchange to follow among his colleagues on the subject of immigration rights for Mexicans.

What he got instead was a lively fusillade of bullets from Puerto Ricans on the subject of independence.

Read more: Bizarre History of Cape May > Cape May congressman witnesses attack on the House firsthand

   

The Bizarre History of Cape May >> All roads lead to Cape May

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Friday, October 12, 2012 12:00 am

 Long ago, before there were parking meters or bumper to bumper traffic on rainy summer Sundays, it was not easy to get from point A to point B in Cape May, or anywhere else in the county for that matter. Some in today’s colloquialism might say if you didn’t have a boat to get around you’d really be up the creek or the ocean without a paddle.

The Indians, who may or may not have been permanent residents here depending upon which version you want to believe, had a pretty good handle on how to get around in their boats and on their horses. It wasn’t exactly the Garden State Parkway or the Cape May-Lewes Ferry but they made it happen without benefit of toll booths.

Read more: The Bizarre History of Cape May >> All roads lead to Cape May

 

Bizarre History of Cape May > Did the future Duchess of Windsor stay at Cape May’s Windsor Hotel?

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Friday, October 05, 2012 09:43 am

During World War I, when she is said to have visited Cape May, Bessie Wallis Warfield would never have made the list of famous American women.

Fast forward 22 years later to the sequel to the war that was supposed to end all wars and that same Bessie Warfield was known as the Duchess of Windsor, one of the world’s most famous, and some will say one of its most scandalous, women.

Read more: Bizarre History of Cape May > Did the future Duchess of Windsor stay at Cape May’s Windsor Hotel?

   

Bizarre History of Cape May > African Americans made important contributions to Cape May

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Thursday, September 27, 2012 10:00 am

Although the world did not treat them kindly or fairly, some African Americans in Cape May managed to survive the indignities with history-making contributions to the world around them.

Among the most famous who brought their cause here, either directly or indirectly before and after the city was to be renamed Cape May, were Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass and Booker Washington.

Read more: Bizarre History of Cape May > African Americans made important contributions to Cape May

 

Bizarre History of Cape May > Civil War generation also has a claim on ‘greatest’

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Thursday, September 20, 2012 12:00 am

How really great was “The Greatest Generation,” as described by Tom Brokaw, former TV anchorman turned author, in his best selling book of the same title?

Is it possible he might have the wrong generation? Perhaps the tribute belongs instead to those who lived through the Civil War.

Read more: Bizarre History of Cape May > Civil War generation also has a claim on ‘greatest’

   

Bizarre History of Cape May > Joseph Leach was minister, teacher, newspaper editor and politician

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Tuesday, September 11, 2012 10:00 pm

 The word was out in 1840, even heard as far north as Shutesbury, Mass., 112 miles west of Boston, that there existed a nice place to live in the south of New Jersey, a place called Cape Island, sometimes referred to as Cape May.

The climate, it was said then, was milder than Shutesbury’s, where the temperature dropped to around 23 degrees in January, and there were growing opportunities for anyone desiring to settle there.

Read more: Bizarre History of Cape May > Joseph Leach was minister, teacher, newspaper editor and politician

 

Bizarre History of Cape May > Cape May home to heroes of Civil War and World War II

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Sunday, September 09, 2012 12:00 am

While much fame as a cavalry soldier from Cape May has been given Henry Washington Sawyer for his capture by the South during the Civil War, and his near execution that followed, sometimes forgotten is the name of another Cape May man who was killed while acting heroically during the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Edwin Joseph Hill was a chief boatswain aboard the Nevada when the Japanese dropped their destruction on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941. The ship’s 23 bandsmen and a Marine color guard were standing at attention on the fantail of the battleship waiting to play morning colors when a rear gunner of a Japanese plane spotted them and opened fire.

Read more: Bizarre History of Cape May > Cape May home to heroes of Civil War and World War II

   

Page 7 of 14