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Science Fair projects could impact the future

  Jennifer Galushka, a 7th grader at Galloway Township Middle School, did her project on shore protection. Jennifer Galushka, a 7th grader at Galloway Township Middle School, did her project on shore protection. GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP – Young people participating in the 39th annual Jersey Shore Science Fair proved Saturday that there is hope for the future. Students in middle and high schools across the state shared research projects that touched on storm protection, technology, communication and public safety.

Seven hundred students from 39 New Jersey schools presented 619 project in the athletic complex at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey on March 22. Projects were judged by professors, teachers and representatives of the business and science communities. Awards were presented for chemistry, natural sciences, mathematics, electronics, engineering and environmental science.

Jennifer Galushka, a seventh grader at Galloway Township Middle School said her project proves that dunes should be built in Margate.

Galushka said she was prompted to do her shore protection project after reading news accounts about Margate residents rejecting the Army Corps of Engineers pending dune building project.

“I love the beach and want to protect the beaches,” she said. “I thought the dune would protect the island from flooding.”

She built miniature sand dunes 1.25 inches high and poured water over them to see how they would hold up. The dune washed away with six cups of water, but stabilized when four cups of water was used twice more.

“I found the dunes were able to protect the island from flooding,” Jennifer said.

Tatianna Perez, 14, of Folsom Elementary School did her project on the importance of language. Tatianna Perez, 14, of Folsom Elementary School did her project on the importance of language. Tatianna Perez, 14, of Folsom Elementary School, who wants to be a polylinguist, thinks the United States should be a bilingual country and teach its citizens to speak Spanish.

“If Americans could speak Spanish as a second language, we would be able to communicate more effectively with 80 percent of the world’s population,” she said.

 Marta Crimi, 8th grade, Fernwood Avenue Middle School, did her project on the importance of math. Marta Crimi, 8th grade, Fernwood Avenue Middle School, did her project on the importance of math. Marta Crimi, an eighth grader at the Fernwood Avenue Middle School in Egg Harbor Township tested females in different age groups to determine how good they are in math.

“The younger groups got better grades on a simple eighth grade math test. Older folks forget the need for math, but with technology today, younger people know the importance of learning math,” she said.

Joshua Ungener of Egg Harbor Township, a 7th grader at Assumption Regional Catholic School did his project on distracted driving. Joshua Ungener of Egg Harbor Township, a 7th grader at Assumption Regional Catholic School did his project on distracted driving.   Dean Hall, a 7th grader at Belhaven Avenue School in Linwood, did his project on the visual impact of color. Dean Hall, a 7th grader at Belhaven Avenue School in Linwood, did his project on the visual impact of color.

Joshua Ungener of Egg Harbor Township, a sixth grader at Assumption Regional Catholic School, discovered the importance of driving without distractions.

He asked his friends to play the Mario Kart video game nine times and tracked their scores with and without interruptions from texting and phone calls. Their scores went down and their game times went up with distractions, he said.

“If you text while driving, you’re going to mess up big time,” Joshua said.

Dean Hall, who is in the seventh grade at the Belhaven Middle School in Linwood, said orange and pink might be a better color for traffic signs.

He briefly showed warm and cool colors to five people and asked them to pick the color they noticed first. The bright colors, such as pink and orange were noticed first, he said.

“This project could help determine colors for street signs to make driving safer,” Dean said.   


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