Superintendent proud of seamless school opening

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Board of Education Vice President Neil Anderson, Superintendent Scott McCartney, Kathi Morris, a partner at Cooper Levenson, and board solicitor Amy Houck as the Board of Education is presented with a check in the amount of $277,669.99 as compensation from faulty construction work completed on the basin outside the Dr. Joyanne D. Miller School. Photo by Laura Stetser Pictured from left is Board of Education Vice President Neil Anderson, Superintendent Scott McCartney, Kathi Morris, a partner at Cooper Levenson, and board solicitor Amy Houck as the Board of Education is presented with a check in the amount of $277,669.99 as compensation from faulty construction work completed on the basin outside the Dr. Joyanne D. Miller School.

EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP – Superintendent Scott McCartney said the school year was kicked off with an incident-free opening of the schools, especially remarkable in light of the troubles other area schools are having with mold.

“I am very proud of the district. We have been proactive in avoiding mold and how we choose to remediate it when it does occur,” he said during the Tuesday, Sept. 11 Board of Education meeting, noting that mold is a common headache for school administrators.

 McCartney said the district’s energy savings program has played a key role in protecting the schools from having to shut down as NorthfieldCommunitySchool did.

 “We installed an air quality unit in classrooms and in our schools that addresses mold and other airborne issues,” he said. “The energy program saves us money, but it also gives us a fixed and focused approach to how we evaluate our facilities.”

 The district’s energy specialist Philip Heery monitors the weather and adjusts the heating and cooling systems accordingly, McCartney explained.

 “It’s not a perfect system, but it’s a good one and a proactive one.”

 Board Vice President Neil Anderson said he was pleased the district can avoid mold and the costs the remediation can carry.

 “A lot of the community does not know how much it costs to deal with mold,” Anderson said. “It can be anywhere from $100,000 to half a million to remediate schools that get affected.”

  In other business, the board was presented with a check for $277,669.99 as damages in a lawsuit against Tamburro Brothers Construction for faulty work conducted on the basin outside the Dr. Joyanne D. MillerSchool. Kathi Morris, a partner at the law firm of Cooper Levenson which represented the district in the case, said the dispute goes back as far as 2009, when the 6-day trial resulted in a win for the district. “Tamburro Brothers appealed to the appellate division and then to the state Supreme Court and lost each time,” she said. 

 Morris said there is one separate pending case that should be resolved in the next few weeks and will award the district an additional $18,924.


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