Free TIme, SandPaper | SummerGazette.com

Cinemania > ‘Iron Man 3’ is the best of the trilogy, and possibly the funniest

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Joe Bell Friday, May 24, 2013 12:08 pm

‘Iron Man 3’ chronicles a dark time in Tony Stark’s character. ‘Iron Man 3’ chronicles a dark time in Tony Stark’s character.

“Iron Man 3,” the third installment in the mighty franchise, does what seems like the impossible: It's a third sequel that corrects the mistakes of the second and improves upon the first. And even up against “The Avengers,” the best movie-going experience of last year, it still manages to satisfy.

This is the darkest point for the Tony Stark character. In the first two “Iron Man” films, he proved that he is a force to be reckoned with. He had attitude and the suit to back it up. But his ego got the best of him.

Read more: Cinemania > ‘Iron Man 3’ is the best of the trilogy, and possibly the funniest

   

OC Beach Patrol on guard for the holiday

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Ann Richardson Friday, May 24, 2013 11:20 am

BEACH PATROL The city’s beaches are scheduled to be opened noon Friday, May 25, with the “unlocking” of the beaches by members of the Ocean City Beach Patrol.

Several beaches will be open for Memorial Day weekend, but due to the ongoing beach replenishment project, Tom Mullineaux, chief of operations for the Ocean City Beach Patrol, said recently some downtown beaches will not be guarded as usual for the holiday weekend.

Read more: OC Beach Patrol on guard for the holiday

   

Limited number of beaches to be guarded in Wildwood

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 24, 2013 05:54 am

WILDWOOD - Lifeguards will be on duty 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday through Monday on Memorial Day weekend, May 25-27, and the following weekend at a limited number of beaches.

Beginning Saturday, June 10, lifeguards will be on duty daily at a limited number of beaches. If necessary, areas that are off-limits to bathers will be designated by red flags bearing the international “no-swimming” symbol, and bathers will be directed to guarded beaches.

Read more: Limited number of beaches to be guarded in Wildwood

   

Hoy’s 5&10 opens after months of renovations

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 24, 2013 02:27 am

 Hoy’s 5&10 opens after months of renovations Hoy’s 5&10 opens after months of renovations

Hoy’s 5&10 is back in business after undergoing months of renovations to correct damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. Three of the company’s four stores – in Ocean City and Avalon – were flooded with 24 to 38 inches of water, and $150,000 of merchandise was lost. Only the Stone Harbor location was spared.

“We saw this as an opportunity to renovate these locations and modernize the layouts,” said David Hoy, co-owner of the family-owned and managed variety stores. “We were able to put in wider aisles, a customer-friendly pathway around the perimeter of the store, and more areas for featured products.”

All 10 full-time staff members and some of the seasonal help pitched in during the aftermath of the hurricane, he said.

Read more: Hoy’s 5&10 opens after months of renovations

   

Wildwood was the name that won out

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Thursday, May 23, 2013 08:08 pm

What’s in a name? Some may have asked that back in the 19th century when they didn’t have a name and were looking for one.

Certainly the name wasn’t Wildwood, at least for another decade.

In 1885 two municipalities were budding, almost at the same time. One was at the north of a five-mile beach island that was destined to become a popular seashore resort. The other was at its southern terminus. Their people were to supplement, if not replace, the Native Americans who came before them.

Read more: Wildwood was the name that won out

   

One Kook's Safari > Find joy in the waves, or wherever you can

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Thursday, May 23, 2013 03:52 pm

 Find joy in the waves, or wherever you can  Find joy in the waves, or wherever you can

It’s remarkably easy to be drowned by the mundane.

Most things are mundane, right? That’s sort of the point.

What’s more, even your favorite tasks will, in the course of time, lose some of their intensity.

Believe it or not, even the glamorous world of weekly newspapers can at times seem a bit of a drag. When James Thurber responded to what someone else described as the drudgery of his time at newspapers in Columbus, New York and Paris, he wrote: “I suppose that even the most pleasurable of imaginable occupations, that of batting baseballs through the windows of the RCA Building, would pall a little as the days ran on.”

Fast forward 70 years, and it seems as though ennui and cynicism have seeped into our souls, that not only every task, but even our recreation seems to bore us beyond words. Isn’t that sort of the essence of cool? The absence of heat – the certainty that no matter what is happening, we’ve seen it before, and we’re not particularly impressed.

Read more: One Kook's Safari > Find joy in the waves, or wherever you can

   

Avalon Performing Arts Council opens season with Blackthorn

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Saturday, May 11, 2013 01:49 pm

Avalon PAC opens season with Irish rock band Blackthorn Avalon PAC opens season with Irish rock band Blackthorn

The Avalon Performing Arts Council will open the summer season Saturday, June 1 with Blackthorn, a popular Philadelphia-based group whose original sounds focus on the harmonies of their Irish roots.

The group, which this year celebrates more than 20 years at the forefront of the Philadelphia music scene, has evolved as a “different” kind of Irish band. Their music pays homage to the influences of their past, while at the same time being contemporary peppered with rock ’n’ roll.

Read more: Avalon Performing Arts Council opens season with Blackthorn

   

Email boating alert aims to keep boaters out of trouble

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Thursday, May 09, 2013 02:27 pm

While the water may look harmless, below the surface is a newly dredged channel precariously close to the shallows on the left. While the water may look harmless, below the surface is a newly dredged channel precariously close to the shallows on the left.

On the Atlantic Coast, a steady line of cruising boats has begun its way north to summer cruising grounds. In addition, hundreds of local marinas, boat clubs and launch ramps are starting to become hives of local boating activity. But what greets boaters cruising the ocean, bays inlets and rivers may be a surprise. Winter storms and hurricanes have deposited new shoals and changed inlet topography, and new navigational issues are always a part of each new boating season.

To help boaters keep clear of trouble, a free East Coast Alert email service by liveaboards and authors Tom and Mel Neale is available at www.BoatUS.com/eastcoastalert.

Using a network of resources including fellow boat owners, marina and waterfront business staff, bridge tenders, state and local government resources and friends gleaned over 28 years, they share news on a range of topics.

For example, recent alerts included warnings about shifted buoys and shoals, information on dredging, changes to drawbridge operating hours, construction and barge activity, fluctuating water levels, U.S. Army Corps operations and in some cases, newfound navigational hazards lurking just below the surface.

Read more: Email boating alert aims to keep boaters out of trouble

   

One Kook's Safari > These are not last year’s beaches

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Thursday, May 09, 2013 01:50 pm

A surfer catches a ride on a nice longboard-friendly day in the south end. If you haven’t been out since last year, the shape of your favorite beach may have changed more than you expect. A surfer catches a ride on a nice longboard-friendly day in the south end. If you haven’t been out since last year, the shape of your favorite beach may have changed more than you expect.  For some folks, it takes time to make up after a big fight.

Imagine there is somebody dear to you, someone who has always been there. Your relationship hasn’t always been perfect, sure, you’ve both done things to hurt each other, but there have been plenty of good times, year after year, one fun time after another. This friend has taught you things your entire life, brought joy in the good times and solace when you needed it most.

Then one day, this friend comes over and trashes your house.

Next time you see her, are you going to be ready to play?

After our first surf session after Sandy tore through the Jersey Shore, my wife, Karen, described it as finally making up with the ocean.

Read more: One Kook's Safari > These are not last year’s beaches

   

Cinemania > Crassly funny ‘Pain and Gain’ has lots of muscle but little meat

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Joe Bell Tuesday, May 07, 2013 08:29 am

CINEMANIA

Anthony Mackie, Dwayne Johnson and Mark Wahlberg are bodybuilders who get caught up in a kidnapping scheme that goes horribly wrong in ‘Pain and Gain.’ Anthony Mackie, Dwayne Johnson and Mark Wahlberg are bodybuilders who get caught up in a kidnapping scheme that goes horribly wrong in ‘Pain and Gain.’

After years of injecting bits of humor into his action films, director Michael Bay makes his foray into straight-up comedy with the much-ballyhooed “Pain and Gain,” starring Dwayne (The Rock) Johnson and an incredibly buff Mark Wahlberg. And although the attempt is successful on some levels, the result is also crass and juvenile.

Bay doesn’t give up entirely on action. The movie features plenty of slow-motion explosions and fistfights. But in this go-round, they are mostly played for laughs.

Read more: Cinemania > Crassly funny ‘Pain and Gain’ has lots of muscle but little meat

   

> business spotlight: Winterwood opens boardwalk shop

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Christie Rotondo Thursday, May 02, 2013 12:25 pm

Photo by Christie Rotondo/ Alexa and Cindy Alvarado pose in their new Winterwood Shoppe on the boardwalk in Wildwood. Photo by Christie Rotondo/ Alexa and Cindy Alvarado pose in their new Winterwood Shoppe on the boardwalk in Wildwood. WILDWOOD- Christmas is coming to the boardwalk this summer.

Winterwood Gift Shoppe, which has three other locations throughout Cape May County, has opened a shop on the boardwalk for the first time.

The location at 3916 Boardwalk, between Spicer and Spencer avenues, opened Thursday, owner Tom Alvarado said.

Read more: > business spotlight: Winterwood opens boardwalk shop

   

Cinemania > Animation dazzles, but ‘The Croods’ fails to evolve

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Joe Bell Friday, March 29, 2013 01:34 pm

'The Croods' is rated PG. 'The Croods' is rated PG

Dreamworks Animation’s “The Croods” tells the story of a prehistoric family forced to embark on a journey far beyond its primitive home. Patriarch Grug (voiced by Nicolas Cage) is the classic overprotective father, trying to shield his adventurous daughter Eep (Emma Stone) from the outside world.

The bulk of the movie is driven by the father-daughter relationship: Eep’s thirst for adventure warring with Grug's stubborn refusal to let her go. Other members of the Crood family include Gran (Cloris Leachman) and Grug's wife, Ugga (Catherine Keener).

Read more: Cinemania > Animation dazzles, but ‘The Croods’ fails to evolve

   

One Kook's Safari > How thick is your wetsuit?

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Thursday, October 04, 2012 04:00 pm

One Kook's Safari   How thick is your wetsuit? One Kook's Safari How thick is your wetsuit?

 My fellow surfers, each of us has a difficult decision before us.

It won’t be easy. Every option has its drawbacks, and there is no perfect solution. Well, not unless you have a lot more money and time than I do.

Do we keep surfing, adding more and more neoprene as the water temperatures drop, or at some point, maybe when it gets to about 48 degrees, do we hang up the board and wait for spring?

I have tried both.

Last year, it was relatively easy. The temperatures just never got that cold. If you forgot to turn off the outside shower, you weren’t going to then have to replace the cracked, frozen pipe, and while you wouldn’t want to paddle out in just a bathing suit, it wasn’t much of a hardship to get in on a sunny day, even if you weren’t a polar bear.

Read more: One Kook's Safari > How thick is your wetsuit?

   

One Kook's Safari>Who’s that presidential surfer?

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Tuesday, October 02, 2012 12:22 pm

There were a few strong waves here and there this week, and nice ones if you stayed away from where they were closing out, because they closed out hard, and that’s just never fun. It is also officially fall, and we got our first blast of really cool air, although the water stayed relatively warm.

Read more: One Kook's Safari>Who’s that presidential surfer?

   

One Kook's Safari>Leslie is ready to throw some waves around

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Friday, September 07, 2012 02:07 pm

Big is a relative idea.

Otherwise, it wouldn't make any sense to say “That’s a big bug” or “What a little car.”

So trying to figure out what amounts to a big wave depends strongly on where you are and who is doing the talking. Mid-summer in Cape May County, a 3- or 4-foot wave amounts to a monster, but when there are people surfing 78-foot waves, it’s hard to claim anything on the East Coast as big. Tow-in riders are looking for 20 feet or better, and all over the world, there are breaks with consistent, rideable waves at 40 feet tall. That counts as a big house.

Read more: One Kook's Safari>Leslie is ready to throw some waves around

   

Page 19 of 31