Free TIme, SandPaper | SummerGazette.com

SOMA Gallery to exhibit work of 3 artists

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Thursday, June 14, 2012 04:37 pm

Sean Taylor, 
“On Top on The World” by Sean Taylor, acrylic and latex on canvas.
Sean Taylor, “On Top on The World” by Sean Taylor, acrylic and latex on canvas.

SOMA NewArt Gallery will present exhibits by three artists June 23-July 29, opening with a reception 6-9 p.m. Friday, June 23 where visitors can meet the artists and enjoy art, music, conversation and refreshments.

SOMA’s Gallery One will feature "The Boxer and the Beauty Queen" by artist Sean Taylor.

Taylor’s new work is a nod to idealistic moments of youthful possibility – an allegory aimed at capturing both the beauty and the tragedy of pinnacle moments in the heights of success, while foreshadowing an inevitable fall.

A resident of Cape May County, Taylor is a graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Richmond. He has exhibited throughout the Northeast and at Art Basel, Miami.

Gallery Two will feature “On the Way to Cape May” in collage and paint by Cape May artist Harriett Sosson – a mixture of reproduced photographs from old Cape May, layered over with classical images to create unique collages. Sosson paints on top of some of the images, adding texture and color.

Read more: SOMA Gallery to exhibit work of 3 artists

   

Stone Harbor Museum could be a thing of the past

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Christie Rotondo Thursday, June 14, 2012 03:17 pm

Stone Harbor’s history rests in the scrapbooks, beach badges, vintage bathing suits and other artifacts housed in the historical museum on 93rd Street – but it may be moving to a new home.

The museum currently resides in a circa 1913 dwelling nestled next to Stone Harbor Elementary School. The building is the property of the Stone Harbor Board of Education, but it is leased to the borough as an extension of the Stone Harbor branch of the Cape May County library.

Plans to build a new library have been in the works for years, and museum President Terry Cwik said that when a new library site is determined, the museum is expected to move with it. However, that depends on available funding and space, leaving the museum’s future in limbo.

Read more: Stone Harbor Museum could be a thing of the past

   

One Kook's Safari > Welcome summer, welcome warmth, welcome waves

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Friday, June 08, 2012 11:58 am

Welcome summer, welcome warmth, welcome waves Welcome summer, welcome warmth, welcome waves

First off, let me welcome back the members of the marine mammal community who have recently returned to the area. Good to see you.

Last weekend saw almost perfect summer surf conditions: blue skies, small, clean and fun clean waves, and water temperatures that were warm enough to finally drop the full suit. I felt fairly miserable, and had to be coaxed into a Sunday session by my lovely surf coach, mentor and wife.

As soon as I stepped onto the beach, we could see a big pod of bottlenose dolphin outside the small break in the south end of Ocean City, about as beautiful a sight as anyone could ask for. They were far enough out that paddling out didn’t disturb them, and I could see some young among them so I didn’t try to get any closer. Any rides would just be a bonus after that.

There were a few. The water seemed a little cold at first, but after a couple of dunks it felt wonderful, especially being liberated from the thick wetsuit.

Read more: One Kook's Safari > Welcome summer, welcome warmth, welcome waves

   

Spray tanning gains ground as a sunless option

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Christie Rotondo Friday, June 08, 2012 06:40 am

Kirstie Kelleher, manager of Suntastic Tan in Cape May Court House, says more customers are trying sunless spray tanning since tanning beds have acquired an unhealthy reputation. Kirstie Kelleher, manager of Suntastic Tan in Cape May Court House, says more customers are trying sunless spray tanning since tanning beds have acquired an unhealthy reputation.

As the dangers of tanning become widely recognized, more and more people are seeking alternative ways to achieve the summer-bronzed look.

One healthier option is sunless spray tanning, according to Kirstie Kelleher, 20, who manages Suntastic Tan in Cape May Court House in a building owned by her family.

Kelleher said the increased risk of developing skin cancer – first associated with sun exposure and now also with tanning beds – is driving the popularity of spray tanning.

“Three out of five people who come into the salon are here to get a spray tan,” she said “It’s crazy. They are scaring everybody away from tanning.”

Longtime clients as well as people who have never tanned before are giving it a try, she noted.

“There’s no risk with it,” said Kelleher.

Read more: Spray tanning gains ground as a sunless option

   

Want to kick up the effectiveness of your workout? Kick up some sand!

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, June 08, 2012 04:13 am

REG-Beach-Workout

If you’re tired of the treadmill and the Stairmaster, take your workout to the beach. Exercising on the beach can add fun, resistance, and variety to your routine, and it’s an easy alternative when you’re at the shore.

Because sand is unstable, the simplest moves require greater balance and agility. Working out on the beach elevates your heart rate and taxes muscles you don’t typically use in the gym.

It also provides a nice break with routine. Going to the gym every day can be monotonous, and your muscles tend to adapt to what you do regularly, so you see less improvement over time.

A beach workout is more challenging in some ways, and more forgiving in others. While the sand has lots of “give” that makes the muscles work harder, the softer surface can be less jarring on the joints. Regular jaunts on the beach build beautiful calves, which are hard to develop by walking. With each step, the body starts to sink and the foot is flexed; that flexion sculpts gorgeous gams. But make sure to avoid the compacted sand at the water’s edge, which can be as unyielding as concrete.

Another advantage of exercising outside: sunlight provides a natural dose of vitamins D and E, which can help prevent autoimmune diseases, ward off heart disease and cancer, build healthy bones and boost your mood, among many other benefits. The beach also is ideal for sit-ups, push-ups and crunches.

Read more: Want to kick up the effectiveness of your workout? Kick up some sand!

   

Museum talk features pastel artist

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, June 08, 2012 01:00 am

The Noyes Museum of Art of Stockton College will present an artist talk by pastel artist Stan Sperlak of Cape May 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 12. His 25th solo exhibition, “Stan Sperlak: Into the Night,” is on view until Sept. 23.

His latest work features landscape paintings of the Mid-Atlantic marshes, waterways, and fields. The paintings are colorful personal journeys through the South Jersey region where he lives and works. The collection of soft pastel paintings demonstrates his fascination with changes in the light that surrounds us.

Read more: Museum talk features pastel artist

   

Help kids master swimming getting them into the water early

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, June 08, 2012 01:00 am

As the end of the school year nears, parents across the country are gearing up to get their children out of the house and into the pool. It’s important to teach children to swim early on, as progressive learning can help them develop swimming skills that will last a lifetime.

According to the Red Cross, drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional injury-related death for children 1 to 14 years old. A child should never be left unattended in or around the water -- even at a home pool, where statistics show toddlers are most susceptible.

Learning to swim is not only a necessary safety measure; it is also a fun physical activity that families can enjoy together.

Read more: Help kids master swimming getting them into the water early

   

Co-op announces featured artists for June

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, June 08, 2012 01:00 am

The Cape May Artists Cooperative will feature the work of Barbara Colosi, Phil Dietz and Christine Peck June 8-July 5 in its gallery at the West End Garage, 484 W. Perry St., Cape May.

A reception will be held 4-7 p.m. Sunday, June 10 for the artists to discuss their work. The reception is part of the citywide Second Sunday Gallery Walk, a partnership of local galleries.

Read more: Co-op announces featured artists for June

   

Beach Reads > June 8, 2012

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Marjorie Preston Thursday, June 07, 2012 09:34 pm

books-second-nature Second Nature

 

Second Nature by Jacquelyn Mitchard, Random House. This story is set in the near future, when face transplants are so advanced as to be truly transfiguring. Maimed as a child in the arson fire that killed her fire-chief father, medical illustrator Sicily Coyne would not have considered the dangerous procedure if not for a misguided lover. When her fiancé proves not only untrustworthy but cruelly deceptive, Sicily decides she will take her one chance at a “normal” life by accepting the offer of a new face. The operation transforms her charred, mask-like features and she soon finds another lover who also proves fickle and fleeting. The author of “The Deep End of the Ocean” brings back characters from that 1996 bestseller to animate this intriguing and masterfully realized tale of a strong, determined young woman who risks all for a second chance.

 

Read more: Beach Reads > June 8, 2012

   

Found it in … North Wildwood

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Thursday, June 07, 2012 05:00 pm

We found “Mister Scoops DeVille” all packed up for vacation in front of Cool Scoops Ice Cream in North Wildwood – a parlor that serves up doo-wop memorabilia along with its ice cream sundaes. Checking out this vintage Chevy Deluxe could give patrons the urge to don a poodle skirt and do the twist.
 
We found “Mister Scoops DeVille” all packed up for vacation in front of Cool Scoops Ice Cream in North Wildwood – a parlor that serves up doo-wop memorabilia along with its ice cream sundaes. Checking out this vintage Chevy Deluxe could give patrons the urge to don a poodle skirt and do the twist.

We found “Mister Scoops DeVille” all packed up for vacation in front of Cool Scoops Ice Cream in North Wildwood – a parlor that serves up doo-wop memorabilia along with its ice cream sundaes. Checking out this vintage Chevy Deluxe could give patrons the urge to don a poodle skirt and do the twist.
 

 

 

   

Cinemania > Brolin shines in ‘Men in Black 3,’ but film fails to wow

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Thursday, June 07, 2012 04:05 pm

mov-men-in-black-3

It's not surprising that the “Men in Black” movies became a franchise. The original entry was big and exciting, a cool concept that mixed humor with special effects for amazing results. It was a perfect popcorn flick.

Is it worth revisiting a third time? The answer is a resounding “Why not?” While better than the first sequel, “Men in Black 3” is nothing short of average. It doesn’t break ground or put anything new on the table, but the story is compelling enough to justify the return of these characters.

This installment opens with evil Boris the Animal, played by Jermaine Clement of “Flight of the Concord,” breaking out of a maximum-security prison on the moon. He vows revenge against Agent K (Tommy Lee Jones), the man in black who took his arm and thwarted his scheme for world domination.

Read more: Cinemania > Brolin shines in ‘Men in Black 3,’ but film fails to wow

   

Flounder hot spots producing nice catches

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Thursday, June 07, 2012 03:05 pm

Candy Jankowski of Marmora was able to net three flounder last Sunday measuring 18, 19 and 20 inches, followed by a 20 1/2- and a 20 3/4-inch flounder on Monday. Candy Jankowski of Marmora was able to net three flounder last Sunday measuring 18, 19 and 20 inches, followed by a 20 1/2- and a 20 3/4-inch flounder on Monday. Striper, black drum catches down as water warms

Most bait and tackle shops and marinas in the area are reporting a steady pickup of fishing over the past week. Flounder fishing is great in the usual hot spots, weakfish are settling in early this spring, and black sea bass are back in season through Sept. 11.

However, the striper catch is beginning to slow down as water temperatures begin to rise. Black drum fishing is being reported as basically nonexistent.

Brennan Marine in Somers Point reported some nice catches of flounder from Elbow Channel behind Somers point by Kathy and Mike Gallagher. The biggest fish they had was a 2.67-pounder. They used a combo of Gulp and minnows. Art Ford fished Ships Channel and hooked up to a 20-inch flounder that weighed 2.3 pounds.

Read more: Flounder hot spots producing nice catches

   

The life of a middle-aged boat and what to do about it

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Thursday, June 07, 2012 02:32 pm

REG-boat-repair

With people, middle age begins at around age 40. With boats, it’s about the 10-year mark. And for both, it signals a time when age begins to show. But that doesn’t mean life is slowing down – only that more effort is needed to stay in shape. With decade-old boats, that means taking a hard look at things that haven’t been checked out over the years. BoatUS offers these nine “middle age” maintenance tips on boats:

Read more: The life of a middle-aged boat and what to do about it

   

Live butterfly exhibit is an ever-changing nature show

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Christie Rotondo Friday, May 25, 2012 10:47 am

The long-winged zebra butterflies in the Imagine Butterflies exhibit are people friendly and appear not to be camera shy The long-winged zebra butterflies in the Imagine Butterflies exhibit are people friendly and appear not to be camera shy

Lance Cockrell said that when he was a kid, he liked to imagine building a big rainforest.

Today, as one of the owners of Imagine Butterflies, he basically has done just that, but on a smaller scale.

Cockrell opened the live butterfly exhibit and gift shop two years ago with his business partner, entomologist Peter Bosak, at the Woodland Village shopping center in the Clermont section of Middle Township. Closed in winter, the exhibit reopened for the season on Mother’s Day weekend.

The butterfly exhibit is contained in a greenhouse just off the gift shop, which specia

Read more: Live butterfly exhibit is an ever-changing nature show

   

Small bookstores turn a new page

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Marjorie Preston Friday, May 25, 2012 10:08 am

Deanna Drumm is the proprietor of the new Cape Atlantic Book Company, set to open this weekend on Cape May’s Washington Street Mall. Deanna Drumm is the proprietor of the new Cape Atlantic Book Company, set to open this weekend on Cape May’s Washington Street Mall.  

Will loss of chains revive independents?

 Over the past 20 years, the centuries-old business of selling books has become a battle for dominance that continues today. Starting in the mid-1990s, chain retailers like Borders and Barnes and Noble expanded their big-box presence; according to USA Today, by 2007 they had forced 1,000 stand-alone bookstores to close. Then the predators became the prey, as e-readers and online bookstores began picking off the megastores.

In 2011, when once-mighty Borders closed hundreds of locations in the United States and Puerto Rico, some pundits predicted the end not only of bricks-and-mortar bookstores, but of books themselves – real, physical books with covers, bindings and pages you can dog-ear.

Read more: Small bookstores turn a new page

   

Bike tour starts with ferry ride across the bay

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 25, 2012 09:48 am

CM-bike-cape-Family-biking-

New Jersey Audubon Nature Center director Gretchen Whitman will lead a bicycle tour of Cape Henlopen, Cape May’s “sister cape” across the Delaware Bay, on June 2.

The all-day tour begins and ends with a ride on the Cape May-Lewes Ferry. Cyclists will explore Cape Henlopen, an area with a history, ecology and culture very different from that of Cape May.

Cyclists will meet 8:30 at the ferry terminal and return at about 6 p.m. The rain date is Sunday, June 3.

A bicycle in excellent condition is required. Participants can bring their own bicycle or rent one at the Lewes terminal. Whitman recommends that riders bring drinks and snacks, suntan lotion, a wide-brimmed hat and a protective helmet, a long-sleeved shirt, cash for lunch and anything else needed for a full day of leisurely (think beach cruiser) yet continuous biking through generally flat terrain.

Read more: Bike tour starts with ferry ride across the bay

   

Happy Days Cafe opens in Ocean City

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 25, 2012 09:10 am

Managers Angelo Cuculino and Kate Basenfelder at the Happy Days Café Managers Angelo Cuculino and Kate Basenfelder at the Happy Days Café  

OC’s ode to the ’50s opens this weekend

A 20-something employee of Happy Days Café said she didn’t think “the younger generation” would appreciate the memorabilia in the ’50s-themed eatery, opening this week at 10th Street and Asbury Avenue in Ocean City.

In reply, manager Angelo Cucolino asked her, “Do you know who Elvis is? Have you ever heard of Marilyn Monroe?”

Of course she said yes, said Cucolina, proving that some things never go out of style.

Read more: Happy Days Cafe opens in Ocean City

   

Don’t be ‘that guy’ holding up the line at the boat ramp

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 25, 2012 06:38 am

REG-boat-ramp

Memorial Day is here. It’s a time to slow down and remember every soldier that has made a sacrifice, suffered death or a life-changing injury so that goobers like me could run around covering bass tournaments and filming fishing shows. Two simple words: Thank you.

But look, I’m convinced that if I ever stop filming fishing shows, I could show up on any boat ramp in America on Memorial Day weekend and film a bestselling blooper tape of people struggling on boat ramps.

Read more: Don’t be ‘that guy’ holding up the line at the boat ramp

   

Service with a Smile - May 25, 2012

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 25, 2012 06:07 am

Service-Boathouse

Mark Kinsey, Olivia Tirello, Rich Fullerton and Sue Jones of the Boathouse Restaurant in Wildwood.

Read more: Service with a Smile - May 25, 2012

   

Beach Reads > May 25, 2012

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Marjorie Preston Thursday, May 24, 2012 04:33 pm

  Books-jackie-after-o  

Jackie After O. By Tina Cassidy, It Books. On Nov. 22, 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy witnessed the assassination of her husband, President John F. Kennedy, in a Dallas motorcade. Five years later the young widow, enshrined in the public imagination as an almost mythically tragic figure, shocked Americans by marrying a toad-like billionaire named Aristotle Onassis and becoming a very public member of the jet set. Five years after that, when Onassis died, “Jackie O” reminded the world that she was more than the widow of a U.S. president, the widow of a Greek billionaire, and a preferred target of the paparazzi. One of the world’s wealthiest and most recognized women, Onassis took a job as a consulting editor at a New York publishing house. The pay was a mere $10,000 per year – which Onassis could have spent in a single day of clothes shopping. Tina Cassidy tells the story of Jackie’s first year on the job, when she faced the wrath of colleagues who thought she didn’t deserve the job, and worked in earnest to gain their trust and earn her keep. This charming and disarming chronicle will give you a glimpse of Onassis as a protective, sometimes frustrated mother of two teens; a seasoned celebrity who knew how to navigate the fishbowl of fame; a cautious lover; and an ambitious, intelligent woman who wanted to do more than star in tabloid headlines.

Read more: Beach Reads > May 25, 2012

   

Page 14 of 19