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Reed Waddle gets some sand back in his shoes

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Written by Christie Rotondo Saturday, July 21, 2012 04:43 pm

Reed Waddle gets some sand back in his shoes Reed Waddle gets some sand back in his shoes

Wildwood’s got a case of the blues this summer.

Reed Waddle, a contemporary singer-songwriter with a bluesy-rock sound, will be playing 9 p.m. Sunday nights at the Oceanic Hotel in Wildwood through Labor Day.

“My music is pretty mellow, so in some places I would not be the ideal fit, but the people here seem to enjoy it,” the singer said Thursday in a telephone interview.

Waddle is a native of Destin, Fla., who has romped through Boston and New York City, winning the grand prize at the New YorkSongwriters Circle. He was a finalist in the American Idol Songwriter Competition, and in June he took home the grand prize at the troubadour competition at 39th annual Telluride Bluegrass Festival in Colorado.

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One Kook's Safari > If you can’t catch a wave, capture the moment

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Written by Bill Barlow Friday, July 20, 2012 04:45 pm

There were some waves out there this week.

In true kook style, I'm writing this with a headache after getting knocked by my board Thursday morning. I tried to duck a wave, and I naturally assumed the board washed behind me. Instead, it was waiting for my head to come up to give me a polite, whitewater-powered tap.

There were also some good rides to be had, and I suspect they only improved as the tide changed. The hot spots looked packed, and the sets seemed about stomach high, maybe a couple coming in bigger. When I actually managed to catch a wave, it was a nice, long, smooth ride.

Several forecasts are calling for the swell to build this weekend, but it looks like it might be a lot messier as well.

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Fluke action moving from bay to ocean

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Friday, July 20, 2012 04:26 pm

Chase Colson of Cumming Ga. caught this flounder and several more from the Old Grounds. Chase Colson of Cumming Ga. caught this flounder and several more from the Old Grounds.

Connor Colson vacationing from Cumming, Ga. was able to net several flounder, bluefish and two black sea bass at the Old Grounds. Connor Colson vacationing from Cumming, Ga. was able to net several flounder, bluefish and two black sea bass at the Old Grounds.

Seasonal fishing is beginning to settle into the back bays, inlets and reefs. What started out to be a great flounder season in the back bays is now shifting to the ocean reefs and wrecks and Delaware Bay's Old Grounds. As we enter into the last couple of weeks of July anglers are still catching flounder in the back but the keepers are few and far between as the fish continue to move out into the ocean.

Tautog season will kick back in Friday, July 27 with a one fish limit at 15 inches. These fish are already beginning to hit the lines but anglers must release the fish until the season opens back up.

The weakfish continue to be caught and in good numbers. Tom Christ of Brennan Marine Supply in Somers Point reported that Bob Whiteside and party of Linwood ventured to the Great Egg Inlet and the Ocean City Reef and came back to the dock with a 16-inch weakfish as well as four keeper flounder. They were using a minnow, squid, and Gulps combo.

Angler Rick Rosenthal and party fished aboard Cashmere and bagged five keeper flounder ranging from 20-22 inches. They were at the southern end of the Ocean City Reef.

Frank Jankowski of Frank's Boat Rentals in Strathmere said the flounder are still being caught in his area but the finding a keeper is the challenge. He said being in the right spot at the right time is key. At least one keeper flounder was brought back to the dock every day this past week ranging from 17 1/2 to 22 inches. The bait proven much success at Frank's Boat Rentals has been minnows with a strip of squid above the minnow.

The biggest flounder brought in at Frank's was a 22-inch landed by Scot and Billy Pfeiffer of Abington, Pa., along with a nice 20-inch second keeper.

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Lifeguard Profile > Second time around is even better for Diamond Beach lifeguard

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Written by Brian Cunniff Tuesday, July 17, 2012 05:10 pm

Lifeguard Tom Popdan Lifeguard Tom Popdan

 Lifeguard Tom Popdan said he felt a strong sense of accomplishment when he swam around Five Mile Island as a 20-year-old back in 1980.

So imagine how he feels now after doing it again at 52.

Popdan, who guards the private beach at the Diamond Beach Club just south of Wildwood Crest, accomplished the feat earlier this month. He began his journey at the 15th Avenue beach in North Wildwood and swam around the entire island, through two inlets, the back bay and past the entire beachfront.

He even shaved significant time off his first effort, completing the journey in 7 hours, 59 minutes. It took him almost 10 hours to finish in 1980.

“It was one of those ‘If I knew then what I know now’ type of things,” Popdan said. “Looking back, I really didn’t know anything about the ocean at all back then when I did it the first time.”

Popdan is a longtime beach lifeguard in the area. Except for a couple of summers he missed due to other commitments, he worked in Wildwood Crest from 1977 through 1994, before doing a 10-year stint as a lifeguard in Stone Harbor. He has been serving in Diamond Beach each summer since 2004.

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One Kook's Safari > The rides wouldn’t be the same without the wait

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Written by Bill Barlow Friday, July 13, 2012 06:27 pm

A longboarder takes a look at the break after walking back up from a strong southern drift Thursday morning. A stellar forecast for the morning meant a lot of people traveled to hit the waves. A longboarder takes a look at the break after walking back up from a strong southern drift Thursday morning. A stellar forecast for the morning meant a lot of people traveled to hit the waves.

Surfing mostly consists of waiting.

That’s not the whole story, of course. There is also looking for waves, lugging your board around, paddling out; once in a while you even catch a ride.

On a good day, in an hour’s session, you might get several rides of maybe 10 seconds each. A 30-second ride is epic.

And people say not much happens in baseball.

Surf magazines, movies, even local columns often give the impression that surfing is mostly made up of time gliding on a wave or getting air above one. The occasional tedium of surf travel is romanticized, but once you hit the water, the image is of nonstop action.

Compare it to a football fan watching only the highlight reel.

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Here’s a treat that beats the heat > Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops

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Written by Staff Reports Friday, July 13, 2012 04:54 pm

In the summer, especially during weather like the recent heat waves, turning on the oven to bake a cake is one of the last things many people want to do.

So what is a dessert-loving family to do?

Lindsay Landis, author of a new book, “The Cookie Dough Lover’s Cookbook,” says there is no need for an oven to create crowd-pleasing summer treats; all that is needed is a little ingenuity.

“On hot days, my mind usually turns to frozen treats such as popsicles or sorbet; for something a bit more elegant I'll whip up a chocolate ganache tart with cookie crust,” she said.

Landis has created more than 50 recipes using egg-free cookie dough that is safe to eat raw.

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Cinemania > ‘Ted’: a decent idea gone unbearably wrong

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Written by Joe Bell Friday, July 13, 2012 04:46 pm

ted

“Ted” is the latest in a long line of comedies about a man stuck in a state of arrested development who needs to grow up. In this case, the difference is the addition of a talking CGI teddy bear. It’s the directorial debut of Seth MacFarlane, the creator of the hit series “Family Guy.”

While this R-rated comedy is allowed to go further than his TV show ever could, the tone of the humor is fairly similar. But the occasional clever moment is surrounded by laziness and an endless number of pop-culture references disguised as jokes.

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Service with a Smile in OC- Jul. 13, 2012

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Written by Staff Reports Friday, July 13, 2012 04:31 pm

Shannon Belden, Matthew Maas, Sara Bruesehoff, and Jess Cowden of the Ocean City Free Public Library in Ocean City. Shannon Belden, Matthew Maas, Sara Bruesehoff, and Jess Cowden of the Ocean City Free Public Library in Ocean City.

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Bandit on the run

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Written by Marjorie Preston Friday, July 13, 2012 04:23 pm

barefoot Well known photo of Colton Harris-Moore being brought to justice, sans shoes. In June 2001, an international manhunt came to an end when teen outlaw Colton Harris-Moore was captured in the Bahamas.

The baby-faced felon, known as the Barefoot Bandit for leaving his shoeless footprints at crime scenes, was taken into custody following a boat chase and gunfire by Bahamian police. When Harris-Moore was paraded before the press for the traditional “perp walk,” the 19-year-old was shackled and of course, shoeless.

A native of Washington state, he started out stealing food from neighbors’ homes and swiftly graduated to cars, trucks, yachts and small planes. He was sentenced to more than six years in federal prison for his crimes and ordered to pay some $1.3 million in restitution.

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High water temp chases fish from back bays

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Friday, July 13, 2012 03:42 pm

- The Breslin family of Columbus had an excellent catch last Friday morning with at least 10 triggerfish onboard First Fish Adventures out of Sea Isle. Tommy Breslin, 11, pulled in a 4 3/4-pound trigger, while his brother J.J., 14, and his dad, Jay, had plenty of action as well.
 
- The Breslin family of Columbus had an excellent catch last Friday morning with at least 10 triggerfish onboard First Fish Adventures out of Sea Isle. Tommy Breslin, 11, pulled in a 4 3/4-pound trigger, while his brother J.J., 14, and his dad, Jay, had plenty of action as well.  Good mixed catches reported at reefs, wrecks

 Last weekend's extreme heat put a damper on many aspects of fishing. First off, many anglers had a hard time dealing with the uncomfortable temperatures. As a matter of fact, the fish had a hard time as well with back bay water temperatures soaring into the 80s. Fishing in the back bays was difficult, but some fish were caught. Those fishing the reefs and wrecks found better luck.

Tom Christ of Brennan Marine Supply in Somers Point said anglers are having success fishing the reefs, although he has heard a few reports of fish being caught in the back.

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Wildwood guard will take the chair until he settles down behind a desk

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Written by Brian Cunniff Friday, July 13, 2012 03:30 pm

LIFEGUARD PROFILE liam bradley:
Liam Bradley of Philadelphia, who mans Wildwood Stand 1, is studying accounting at Temple University. 

LIFEGUARD PROFILE liam bradley: Liam Bradley of Philadelphia, who mans Wildwood Stand 1, is studying accounting at Temple University.

Liam Bradley is studying to be an accountant, a profession that most likely will have him behind a desk for much of his adult life.

So before he embarks on what he hopes is a long and prosperous professional career, Bradley is working in a job in which he will never sit behind a desk.

A 20-year-old Temple University student from Philadelphia, Bradley is in his second year as a lifeguard for the Wildwood Beach Patrol.

A graduate of Roman Catholic High School and a resident of the Rhawnhurst section of the city, he has been coming to the shore in the summer for 15 years. And now he has what he feels is the perfect summer job.

“I figure the best possible job to have is to be a lifeguard. You could work at a waterpark or on the boardwalk, but to me, nothing beats working 9 to 5 on the beach.

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Culinary camp gives kids a taste for cooking

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, July 12, 2012 01:00 am

At Kitchen Wizards’ culinary enrichment camp, children are taught the skills needed to feel competent in the kitchen. At Kitchen Wizards’ culinary enrichment camp, children are taught the skills needed to feel competent in the kitchen.

Kids can learn the magic of cooking this summer and acquire skills that last a lifetime at a new culinary enrichment camp taking place at the Stone Harbor community center.

Kitchen Wizards, a division of the Kathy’s Just Desserts Inc., based in Pennsylvania, will be conducting the camps for Stone Harbor Recreation in the new community center’s state of the art kitchen.

Each camp will run two hours per day for four days, Monday through Thursday, and feature a different theme.

The fee is $160 for each camp, which includes a meal each day cooked by the students, a chef’s hat, recipe booklet, certificate of completion, and an apron.

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One Kook's Safari > Is saying ‘obsessive surfer’ redundant?

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Written by Bill Barlow Friday, July 06, 2012 04:23 pm

One Kook's Safari > Is saying ‘obsessive surfer’ redundant?

It has become a pattern.

If anyone were to ask, I’d strongly advise against trying to get a surfing session in on July 4. If you absolutely needed to squeeze in a couple of rides, then I’d say, paddle in about 6 a.m., or at the very least before the guards hit the beach in the morning.

Especially if it’s hot like this year, there are way too many obstacles on a summer holiday, and surfing takes a lot of room. In the unguarded areas where you can surf, you are trying to keep track of swimmers, kayakers, boogie boards, possibly a catamaran or two, and the occasional rocketing lure from a surf fisherman before you even try to catch a wave.

Some spots are guarded surf beaches, including some that are for surfing only. I would highly recommend those, especially for beginners, but there are only so many waves to go around. There are fewer kinds of obstacles, but it’s still pretty crowded.

It’s not a hard and fast rule, but chances are, if someone is paddling out in the middle of a packed beach holiday, they have not been doing this long. A bunch of the most dedicated longboarders in Ocean City used to take a long kayak trip in the open ocean every Independence Day, because there was no point in trying to hit the waves.

Still, every year, there I am, bobbing out past the break, trying to find a clear line and keep track of where the kids are.

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SUP yoga is an on-board balancing act

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Written by Christie Rotondo Friday, July 06, 2012 11:15 am

Andrea Magda teaches stand-up paddleboard yoga classes on Cape May’s salt marshes because the water there is calm. Andrea Magda teaches stand-up paddleboard yoga classes on Cape May’s salt marshes because the water there is calm. Maria Stalter, trying yoga on a stand-up paddleboard for the first time, assumes a yoga position. Maria Stalter, trying yoga on a stand-up paddleboard for the first time, assumes a yoga position.

To an observer, assuming the downward-facing-dog yoga position on a paddleboard in the middle of the Cape May salt marshes looks like it might be more stressful than soothing. However, it seems that once participants are out there, floating on the gentle current and deep-breathing the fresh salt air, its attraction becomes quite clear.

“Yoga is about being in the present, and living in the present moment,” Andrea Magda tells a group of first-time stand-up paddle board participants as they set off for a stand-up paddleboard yoga class at Cape Kayaks.

Magda says nothing puts a person in the present like trying simple yoga poses in a new environment – such as on the waters of the salt marsh.

“There’s no time to think about going to the beach by 10, or where you have to be later,” Magda said. “So it forces you to be in the present moment.”

In a studio, lunges, the tree pose and other standing yoga asanas are considered introductory positions. On a paddleboard, however, students have to focus harder on their breathing and balance to stick these simple poses.

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Crest lifeguard is engineering a nuclear future

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Written by Brian Cunniff Friday, July 06, 2012 10:39 am

Brian Cunniff
 Scott Wandel is a third-year guard who watches over the beach at Sweetbriar Road in Wildwood Crest.
Brian Cunniff Scott Wandel is a third-year guard who watches over the beach at Sweetbriar Road in Wildwood Crest.

Scott Wandel is currently providing safety for beachgoers at the Jersey Shore. In the near future, he hopes to be providing safe, efficient ways for people to get to the beach.

The third-year lifeguard with the Wildwood Crest Beach Patrol recently graduated from Penn State University with a degree in mechanical engineering. He is nowhere near finished with his studies, however. Wandel plans to return to Penn State in the fall to begin what figures to be a five- or six-year journey toward a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering.

“I’d like to eventually be a professor and do a lot of research,” the 22-year-old resident of Carson City, Nev., said. “Until then I’d like to do a lot of scientific work at a lab. We have a big energy dilemma, and nuclear energy is key. It’s the next hot topic. Is it the energy of the future? Maybe. But something has to be done about (utilizing) renewable energy. I think nuclear is a step in the right direction.”

It’s not often residents of Nevada find their way east both to attend college and work in the summer. Wandel, however, spent much of his youth in York, Pa., and was a regular shore-goer thanks to his father, Tom, who was a lifeguard in Wildwood Crest for a few years in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

“My family’s always been coming here in the summers,” Wandel said.

His father has a high-profile job with Starbucks, which is why the family has been on the move a bit. They are about to make another move to Seattle.

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