• Summer Magazines

    tomatoesSometimes, it seems as though there should be sort of a reverse toll at all bridges leading over the Delaware into South Jersey, with a nice old man in work trousers stopping each car.

    “Welcome to New Jersey,” he’d say. “Here’s your tomato.”

  • Summer Magazines

     Liz Anderson, AKA the Egg Lady, with son Daniel and a dozen blue-green eggs. She sells her extra eggs from her front porch on Route 50 in Tuckahoe.  Growing up on her dad’s farm in Upper Township, Liz Anderson knows chickens.

    So it seemed natural that she and her husband, Tom, would keep a few at their place in Tuckahoe for the eggs.

    “We always ate…

  • Summer Magazines

    green beansWhen most folks think of organic farming, they tend to focus on the stuff added to a field that kills things, not what’s added to make things grow.

    The connection is clear and – for some – fairly visceral. Pesticides kill bugs, herbicides kill weeds and fungicides kill fungus, allowing the plants we like to eat to thrive. But many people question what happens when we eat the crops that have been treated with chemicals designed to kill, even if they are said to be harmless if used as directed.

    Others wonder what happens to the…

  • Summer Magazines

     spinach You can’t talk about spinach without talking about Popeye, says Ken Thompson, a farmer with a spread out in Tuckahoe.

    It’s a late weekend afternoon, and Thompson is not working on spinach; he’s weeding strawberries, giving the now flowering patch a fighting chance against the competition. In this case, it’s an enormous variety of grasses, stalks, thistles and ivies. Dandelions ready their parachute seeds on white heads, while another shade of green in the tangle explodes on contact, sending a burst of seeds forcefully into the air.

  • Summer Magazines

     pumpkin Almost everything about a pumpkin – the color, the taste, its very presence on almost every other doorstep – says fall is here. They line roadside stands, decorate classrooms, and get carved into a million shapes for Halloween.

    Somehow, those big orange decorations are related to the pumpkin flavor found in pies and seasonal specialty coffees, but it seems as though very few people have witnessed the process of turning a fresh pumpkin into dinner or dessert.

  • Summer Magazines

    Economy and trend meet in canning revival

    It’s late summer, and for now we are awash in fresh, local food. Markets, produce counters and your neighbor’s garden overflow with tomatoes, squash and other goodies, but the leaves are falling and the first cold snap can’t be too far away.

    If only there were some way of preserving these summer flavors for the winter.

  • Summer Magazines

    Corny ramblings for a late-summer feast

    When it comes to corn, are you a typewriter or a lathe?

    For the digital natives who may happen to read this, a typewriter used to have a little roller that held the paper, which would advance one letter at a time until the carriage was returned, and the type proceeded to the next line. Yes, it was a pain, but still a step up from engraving everything on stone tablets.

    So for corn on the cob, a typewriter eats one line…

  • Summer Magazines

    No one ever said farming was easy: especially farmers.

    Each year is either drought or too rainy, too cold for one crop or too hot for another, and if everything cooperates, if the season is absolutely perfect, then there’s a glut and the prices drop.

    In Cape May County, the amount of land under cultivation has dwindled for years, and in many cases folks whose parents and grandparents or great grandparents were farmers have decided to find something else to do.

  • Summer Magazines

     Steve Bradley shows off some of the fruit from his backyard shrub. He said it’s at least 50 years old, maybe close to 100, and seems to be going strong. Figs are said to be one of the first plants humans ever cultivated, apparently beating out staples like wheat and rye by a good measure. Ancient texts mention the fruit from thousands of years before…

  • Summer Magazines

    Bill Eisele and his grandson Luke Eisele get ready to remove the honey from frames collected from one of his several bee hives.

    Bill Eisele does not seem particularly worried about stings.

    It’s getting on sunset at his Christmas tree farm in Petersburg, and he’s checking a hive, protected only by a short-sleeved golf shirt and a couple decades’ worth of experience working around bees. No smoking, no mesh hood, no apparent concern.




Free TIme, SandPaper

The kitchen diva: Cool food

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Thursday, July 17, 2014 04:03 pm

Cool food

"As cool as a cucumber" is a much-used phrase, referring to a state of mind rather than the clean crunch of the pale-green flesh of a cucurbit, but it is true. There isn't a summer-fruiting food that is cooler than a cucumber. When the weather wilts you, a cucumber is nature's tasty refreshment.

Cucumbers are a member of a large, diverse family of summer-ripening crops that include melons and squash.

Read more: The kitchen diva: Cool food

   

Frozen bliss

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Lauren Dickey Thursday, July 17, 2014 02:28 pm

July is National Ice Cream Month, and the shore has plenty of places to grab a scoop of this sweet and refreshing summertime treat

In a cone, on a stick or in a cup, plain, topped with jimmies or smothered in hot fudge, ice cream is one of the most irresistible and refreshing treats of summer.

Read more: Frozen bliss

   

Jersey corn and tomatoes make an early debut

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Monday, July 07, 2014 05:23 pm

corn-and-tomatoes New Jersey recorded its warmest spring ever this year, and those warmer-than-normal temperatures brought the sweet corn and tomato crops in about a week or two early, according to New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher.

Look for Jersey Fresh sweet corn and tomatoes in your local supermarket, roadside stands and community farmers markets this weekend.

Read more: Jersey corn and tomatoes make an early debut

   

West Cape May Farmers Market in its 13th year

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Christopher South Monday, June 30, 2014 12:00 am

WEST CAPE MAY - The West Cape May Farmers Market is now an adolescent in terms of its chronological age, but it has grown nicely from what it was.

“We first started out front in the parking lot, where it was 300 degrees on the pavement and people had difficulty parking,” Mayor Pam Kaithern said.

The borough then got a one-time grant from the county for creating handicap-accessible recreation projects. The borough gave part of the money to the West Cape May Elementary School to improve its playground equipment.

Read more: West Cape May Farmers Market in its 13th year

   

Jersey fresh strawberries are in season

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Tuesday, June 03, 2014 02:37 pm

strawberry Jersey Fresh strawberries are here, and the plump, juicy fruit is available now at farmers markets, grocery stores and pick-your-own farms in the state. Harvesting began in mid-May and is expected to continue through early June.

Nutritionists consider strawberries to be a part of a healthy diet, providing a good source of vitamin C. Strawberries should not be washed until ready to eat because their high water content, on top of the additional water, will result in a mushy berry. Once the caps are removed, an enzyme is released that destroys the vitamin C.

Read more: Jersey fresh strawberries are in season

   

The Kitchen Diva: Asparagus brings a taste of spring to the table

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by ANGELA SHELF MEDEARIS Tuesday, May 13, 2014 09:59 am

 The Kitchen Diva: Asparagus brings a taste of spring to the table The Kitchen Diva: Asparagus brings a taste of spring to the table

Nothing says spring is here like a beautiful bunch of crisp asparagus. While asparagus is available year-round, it's much better when purchased locally.

Asparagus is easy to select and prepare, and comes in a variety of vibrant colors including green, violet, purple and white. It also grows wild and is commercially available fresh, frozen and canned.

Read more: The Kitchen Diva: Asparagus brings a taste of spring to the table

   

Mario’s in Ocean City reopens 17 months after Sandy

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Ann Richardson Thursday, April 24, 2014 12:00 am

 Claire Lowe / Co-owners and brothers Giuseppe and Ernesto Cannuscio of Linwood stand outside Mario’s at 1510 Bay Avenue moments before officially re-opening Thursday, March 27, 17 months after sustaining damage from Hurricane Sandy. Claire Lowe / Co-owners and brothers Giuseppe and Ernesto Cannuscio of Linwood stand outside Mario’s at 1510 Bay Avenue moments before officially re-opening Thursday, March 27, 17 months after sustaining damage from Hurricane Sandy. OCEAN CITY - After 17 months of repairs and renovations, brothers Giuseppe and Ernesto Cannuscio welcomed back employees and customers Thursday, March 27 to their Bay Avenue pizzeria, which has been closed since Hurricane Sandy in October 2012.

On Thursday, members of the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce helped celebrate the occasion with a ribbon cutting ceremony. The festivities marked the end of a long journey back for the Cannuscio family.

Read more: Mario’s in Ocean City reopens 17 months after Sandy

   

Cape May ferry offers Wine Lovers Cruise at sunset

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Wednesday, September 18, 2013 03:30 pm

The cruise includes round-trip foot passage, wine samplings and hors d’oeuvres.  The cruise includes round-trip foot passage, wine samplings and hors d’oeuvres.

Wine Lovers Sunset Cruises on the Delaware Bay are back at the Cape May-Lewes Ferry. The cruises are scheduled to leave the terminal at 6 p.m. on four successive Saturdays starting Sept. 14.

The cruise is scheduled to coincide with sunset over the bay. While listening to live music, passengers will sample various wines and nosh on hors d'oeuvres.

The fare is $50 and includes round-trip foot passenger ferry cruise, wine samplings and pairings. Cruise passengers can also purchase the featured wines by the glass.

Read more: Cape May ferry offers Wine Lovers Cruise at sunset

   

Food and Wine Celebration flaunts the many flavors of Cape May

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, September 13, 2013 07:13 am

 The Cape May Clambake noon-3 p.m. at Hawk Haven Vineyard and Winery in Rio Grande  The Cape May Clambake noon-3 p.m. at Hawk Haven Vineyard and Winery in Rio Grande will include steamed clams, lobster tail, corn on the cob, shrimp, mussels, wine and more.

CAPE MAY – Saturday is the start of a nine-day celebration of food and wine in Cape May, a town many consider to be the restaurant capital of New Jersey.

The 17th annual Cape May Food and Wine Celebration will pay homage to local gastronomic delights with winery tours, food, wine and beer tastings, food demonstrations, Chef’s Dine-Arounds and other events from Sept. 14 through Sunday, Sept. 22.

Read more: Food and Wine Celebration flaunts the many flavors of Cape May

   

The Wild Burrito serves Mexican fare with an American flair

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Christie Rotondo Friday, August 30, 2013 10:07 am

 John Carpenter makes a veggie burrito at The Wild Burrito in Wildwood Crest.  John Carpenter makes a veggie burrito at The Wild Burrito in Wildwood Crest.

WILDWOOD CREST - A few years ago, John Carpenter noticed that there was nowhere in the Wildwoods for people to get “Americanized” Mexican food, let alone a place for vegetarians and vegans to find some grub.

Fast forward to 2013, where Carpenter’s The Wild Burrito on New Jersey Avenue in Wildwood Crest is bringing Mexican food with a fresh twist to Five Mile Island.

Read more: The Wild Burrito serves Mexican fare with an American flair

   

Page 1 of 3