• Summer Magazines

     Rob, Catherine and Karl Giulian join their dad, Karl Giulian, to talk about backyard gardens. The youngest, David, is not pictured.  Karl Giulian can’t wait for his kids to get older.

    He’s looking forward to it for all the usual reasons of course, but there’s an ulterior motive as well. The swing set is in the way of his garden expansion.

    His 12-foot-by-12-foot garden has already slipped its borders, with potted colonies…

  • Summer Magazines

    Cape May Salts are taking offOyster

    At low tide on an overcast spring morning, James Tweed is at the beach.

    It does not look inviting.

    His white rubber boots are covered with a silty mud, and a sweatshirt – hood up – protects him from a portion of the swarms of tiny insects that seem to live solely to bury themselves in hairlines and start biting.

    On this particular morning, he’s oyster wrangling.

  • Summer Magazines

     spinach You can’t talk about spinach without talking about Popeye, says Ken Thompson, a farmer with a spread out in Tuckahoe.

    It’s a late weekend afternoon, and Thompson is not working on spinach; he’s weeding strawberries, giving the now flowering patch a fighting chance against the competition. In this case, it’s an enormous variety of grasses, stalks, thistles and ivies. Dandelions ready their parachute seeds on white heads, while another shade of green in the tangle explodes on contact, sending a burst of seeds forcefully into the air.

  • Summer Magazines

    Here’s one for Joe and Joanne Sixpack. 

    You know, regular folks. The common people. Those with taste.

    Let’s face it, beer gets a bad rap. Its reputation has improved in recent years, but for many, the world’s first alcoholic brew, and the most popular, is shorthand for plebian tastes. Think of Homer (Simpson, not the Illiad author) downing Duff Beer while sitting in the kitchen in his underwear.

  • Summer Magazines

     Farm markets offer a direct connectionEverything you eat grew somewhere.

    In the meantime, it may have been canned, frozen, broiled, fried or processed beyond recognition, but somewhere, at some time, the last bite you’ve taken was alive, growing, in a field or a hothouse or a pen or a bay.

    It’s funny how easy that can be to forget.

  • Summer Magazines

    beach plums Beach plums are nothing new.

    For generations, locals have gathered the small, tart plums along roadsides and in the dunes, mostly for jellies and jams.

    The fruit is much smaller than the European or Asian plums, to which it is related, and when ripe can range in size from about a pea, to a Bing cherry, or the size of a grape tomato for a really big one.

  • Summer Magazines

    Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table

     Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table  They look like something Picasso dreamed up on a bet, but fish fans say they taste wonderful.

    Ocean City local Dave Fuschillo had high hopes of bringing in some keepers this week, when he planned to spend an afternoon in the back bay around 17th Street casting for summer flounder.

  • Summer Magazines

    Some say the berry you wait for tastes best

    So maybe you’ve been feeling pretty pleased with yourself. After all, you’ve switched over to organic greens now that they are pre-washed and easy to use, and you’ve traded sausage and bacon for the frozen simulated stuff in the green box. Maybe you even recycle the box. 

    Then suddenly, one of your friends goes localvore. 

    Here we go again.

  • Summer Magazines

     Doc Adams Through this season, in this space, readers have been enticed, cajoled and nagged to eat local food, and lots of it.

    Not this week.

    Instead, we’ll talk about what once was, and why it’s changed. And why one of the favorite fish for many anglers is now more or less off the menu.

  • Summer Magazines

    No one ever said farming was easy: especially farmers.

    Each year is either drought or too rainy, too cold for one crop or too hot for another, and if everything cooperates, if the season is absolutely perfect, then there’s a glut and the prices drop.

    In Cape May County, the amount of land under cultivation has dwindled for years, and in many cases folks whose parents and grandparents or great grandparents were farmers have decided to find something else to do.



Cool Scoops is where doo-wop meets dessert

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Paul and Lori Russo enjoy collecting items from the 1950s and ’60s to decorate their Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood. Paul and Lori Russo enjoy collecting items from the 1950s and ’60s to decorate their Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood.

At Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood, the ’50s style cars and décor are almost as cool as the ice cream sundaes and novelties served up daily. The old-time parlor contains a treasure trove of memorabilia from the 1950s and ’60s.

Genuine autographs hang on every wall, ranging from the Beatles, Marilyn Monroe and Elvis to the casts of “Happy Days,” “Lavern and Shirley,” “Gilligan’s Island” and “Star Trek.”

“There’s something for everyone,” said owner and collector Paul Russo, whose collection adorns almost every inch of the nearly 3,000-square-foot shop. A special wall is dedicated to the musical history of the Wildwoods.

The Cool Scoops franchise was created and designed by the Paul and his wife, Lori, in 2002.

“We wanted our visitors to take a step back in time to the fabulous ’50s, and I think we achieved our goals,” Russo said.

Cool Scoops made its national TV debut in 2006 on “Trading Spaces,” followed by a doo-wop episode on the Travel Channel, “Taste That Town” and “Tail Fins and Chrome,” and filming wrapped up recently for a new episode on the Travel Channel that will air June 2012, he said.

Celebrating their 10th anniversary summer, the Russos have added even more items to their menu. The Hot Wheel Waffle and the You’re a Good Waffle, Charlie Brownie now join the Cone-Oli, a cone filled with cannoli cream and the Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Fudge Sundae.

Mainstays like the Scoop-Deville, Lil Deuce Scoops, Dusty Road Sundae,

Kryptonite Sundae, Abbott and Cone-Stello and the Elvis Pretzelly are customer favorites, he said.

Lunch menu items include Sha-Na-Nachos, Leave it to Pizza, the DooWoper,

Big Mack the Knife, Howdy Doody Dog and the Hound Dog.

Lori Russo said the shop offers items for those who have food allergies.

“We cater to all visitors with allergies – peanut, dairy and gluten, to be exact. We want everyone to be able to have fun here,” she said.

Her husband adds new items and events every year and has plans for a drive-in movie – actually a sit-in movie – are in the works for 2012.

Cool Scoops is at 12th Avenue and New Jersey Avenue. For information call (609) SAY-COOL (729-2665) or see www.coolscoops.com.

 


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