• Summer Magazines

     Liz Anderson, AKA the Egg Lady, with son Daniel and a dozen blue-green eggs. She sells her extra eggs from her front porch on Route 50 in Tuckahoe.  Growing up on her dad’s farm in Upper Township, Liz Anderson knows chickens.

    So it seemed natural that she and her husband, Tom, would keep a few at their place in Tuckahoe for the eggs.

    “We always ate…

  • Summer Magazines

    For strawberries, red means go One of the highlights of summer eating is now ready

    There’s no avoiding the conclusion that strawberries want to be eaten.

    Look at it this way; they don’t exactly hide, do they? At least when they are ready and ripe.

  • Summer Magazines

    green beansWhen most folks think of organic farming, they tend to focus on the stuff added to a field that kills things, not what’s added to make things grow.

    The connection is clear and – for some – fairly visceral. Pesticides kill bugs, herbicides kill weeds and fungicides kill fungus, allowing the plants we like to eat to thrive. But many people question what happens when we eat the crops that have been treated with chemicals designed to kill, even if they are said to be harmless if used as directed.

    Others wonder what happens to the…

  • Summer Magazines

     pizza So it’s unequivocally late summer. Garden ripe tomatoes are piling up in offices, being traded back and forth among neighbors and co-workers like the seashells of the Trobriand Islanders, only with an expiration date.

    Roving bands of teenagers are forcing brown bags of enormous zucchini on unsuspecting passers-by.

    And while we’re nowhere near out of topics, we’ve covered a lot of ground in this space already, exploring the variety of fresh, local food available to anyone who wants to look for it.

  • Summer Magazines

    Corny ramblings for a late-summer feast

    When it comes to corn, are you a typewriter or a lathe?

    For the digital natives who may happen to read this, a typewriter used to have a little roller that held the paper, which would advance one letter at a time until the carriage was returned, and the type proceeded to the next line. Yes, it was a pain, but still a step up from engraving everything on stone tablets.

    So for corn on the cob, a typewriter eats one line…

  • Summer Magazines

     eggplant

    It’s as Italian as parmigiana, as French as ratatouille, and as Arab as baba ghanoush, without even getting started on moussaka, Szechuan-style eggplant and garlic sauce or a few dozen Indian dishes.

    In other words, eggplant tastes like home to a huge swath of humanity, under many names and many, many different kinds of spices.

  • Summer Magazines

    Economy and trend meet in canning revival

    It’s late summer, and for now we are awash in fresh, local food. Markets, produce counters and your neighbor’s garden overflow with tomatoes, squash and other goodies, but the leaves are falling and the first cold snap can’t be too far away.

    If only there were some way of preserving these summer flavors for the winter.

  • Summer Magazines

    No one ever said farming was easy: especially farmers.

    Each year is either drought or too rainy, too cold for one crop or too hot for another, and if everything cooperates, if the season is absolutely perfect, then there’s a glut and the prices drop.

    In Cape May County, the amount of land under cultivation has dwindled for years, and in many cases folks whose parents and grandparents or great grandparents were farmers have decided to find something else to do.

  • Summer Magazines

     Doc Adams Through this season, in this space, readers have been enticed, cajoled and nagged to eat local food, and lots of it.

    Not this week.

    Instead, we’ll talk about what once was, and why it’s changed. And why one of the favorite fish for many anglers is now more or less off the menu.

  • Summer Magazines

    Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table

     Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table  They look like something Picasso dreamed up on a bet, but fish fans say they taste wonderful.

    Ocean City local Dave Fuschillo had high hopes of bringing in some keepers this week, when he planned to spend an afternoon in the back bay around 17th Street casting for summer flounder.




Cool Scoops is where doo-wop meets dessert

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Paul and Lori Russo enjoy collecting items from the 1950s and ’60s to decorate their Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood. Paul and Lori Russo enjoy collecting items from the 1950s and ’60s to decorate their Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood.

At Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood, the ’50s style cars and décor are almost as cool as the ice cream sundaes and novelties served up daily. The old-time parlor contains a treasure trove of memorabilia from the 1950s and ’60s.

Genuine autographs hang on every wall, ranging from the Beatles, Marilyn Monroe and Elvis to the casts of “Happy Days,” “Lavern and Shirley,” “Gilligan’s Island” and “Star Trek.”

“There’s something for everyone,” said owner and collector Paul Russo, whose collection adorns almost every inch of the nearly 3,000-square-foot shop. A special wall is dedicated to the musical history of the Wildwoods.

The Cool Scoops franchise was created and designed by the Paul and his wife, Lori, in 2002.

“We wanted our visitors to take a step back in time to the fabulous ’50s, and I think we achieved our goals,” Russo said.

Cool Scoops made its national TV debut in 2006 on “Trading Spaces,” followed by a doo-wop episode on the Travel Channel, “Taste That Town” and “Tail Fins and Chrome,” and filming wrapped up recently for a new episode on the Travel Channel that will air June 2012, he said.

Celebrating their 10th anniversary summer, the Russos have added even more items to their menu. The Hot Wheel Waffle and the You’re a Good Waffle, Charlie Brownie now join the Cone-Oli, a cone filled with cannoli cream and the Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Fudge Sundae.

Mainstays like the Scoop-Deville, Lil Deuce Scoops, Dusty Road Sundae,

Kryptonite Sundae, Abbott and Cone-Stello and the Elvis Pretzelly are customer favorites, he said.

Lunch menu items include Sha-Na-Nachos, Leave it to Pizza, the DooWoper,

Big Mack the Knife, Howdy Doody Dog and the Hound Dog.

Lori Russo said the shop offers items for those who have food allergies.

“We cater to all visitors with allergies – peanut, dairy and gluten, to be exact. We want everyone to be able to have fun here,” she said.

Her husband adds new items and events every year and has plans for a drive-in movie – actually a sit-in movie – are in the works for 2012.

Cool Scoops is at 12th Avenue and New Jersey Avenue. For information call (609) SAY-COOL (729-2665) or see www.coolscoops.com.

 


blog comments powered by Disqus