• Summer Magazines

    Cape May Salts are taking offOyster

    At low tide on an overcast spring morning, James Tweed is at the beach.

    It does not look inviting.

    His white rubber boots are covered with a silty mud, and a sweatshirt – hood up – protects him from a portion of the swarms of tiny insects that seem to live solely to bury themselves in hairlines and start biting.

    On this particular morning, he’s oyster wrangling.

  • Summer Magazines

    The season starts now, but it doesn’t last

    A more mature writer, in a more serious publication, could probably resist a lead like “this is the dawning of the age of asparagus.” 

    Fat chance. 

    The flowers are blooming, the days are long, and those in shorts and flip-flops no longer seem pathological. 

  • Summer Magazines

     Rob, Catherine and Karl Giulian join their dad, Karl Giulian, to talk about backyard gardens. The youngest, David, is not pictured.  Karl Giulian can’t wait for his kids to get older.

    He’s looking forward to it for all the usual reasons of course, but there’s an ulterior motive as well. The swing set is in the way of his garden expansion.

    His 12-foot-by-12-foot garden has already slipped its borders, with potted colonies…

  • Summer Magazines

     Doc Adams Through this season, in this space, readers have been enticed, cajoled and nagged to eat local food, and lots of it.

    Not this week.

    Instead, we’ll talk about what once was, and why it’s changed. And why one of the favorite fish for many anglers is now more or less off the menu.

  • Summer Magazines

     pizza So it’s unequivocally late summer. Garden ripe tomatoes are piling up in offices, being traded back and forth among neighbors and co-workers like the seashells of the Trobriand Islanders, only with an expiration date.

    Roving bands of teenagers are forcing brown bags of enormous zucchini on unsuspecting passers-by.

    And while we’re nowhere near out of topics, we’ve covered a lot of ground in this space already, exploring the variety of fresh, local food available to anyone who wants to look for it.

  • Summer Magazines

     spinach You can’t talk about spinach without talking about Popeye, says Ken Thompson, a farmer with a spread out in Tuckahoe.

    It’s a late weekend afternoon, and Thompson is not working on spinach; he’s weeding strawberries, giving the now flowering patch a fighting chance against the competition. In this case, it’s an enormous variety of grasses, stalks, thistles and ivies. Dandelions ready their parachute seeds on white heads, while another shade of green in the tangle explodes on contact, sending a burst of seeds forcefully into the air.

  • Summer Magazines

     pumpkin Almost everything about a pumpkin – the color, the taste, its very presence on almost every other doorstep – says fall is here. They line roadside stands, decorate classrooms, and get carved into a million shapes for Halloween.

    Somehow, those big orange decorations are related to the pumpkin flavor found in pies and seasonal specialty coffees, but it seems as though very few people have witnessed the process of turning a fresh pumpkin into dinner or dessert.

  • Summer Magazines

     Scallop-boat

    Fishing is dangerous work.

    Not that there was any doubt of that, but recent events have made it crystal clear: the men on the boats heading into the open ocean place their lives on the line to bring home the catch, and to make a living in one of the county’s biggest industries.

    This week, the Coast Guard has convened a Board of Inquiry to find out what brought down the Lady Mary March 24, the deadliest fishing accident in New Jersey in years. Of the seven crewmembers out on a multi-day scalloping trip, only…

  • Summer Magazines

    crabs While the flavor is beloved, and many see a pile of steamed crabs, a nutcracker, a table full of friends and a cooler of beer as a vision of shore heaven, there is no denying they are, at first glace, not exactly the most appetizing creatures.

    An earlier column in this series referred to the red of a ripe strawberry as an invitation. Hardshell blue crabs offer no such invitation. Instead, they seem to make a pretty straightforward case to be left alone.

  • Summer Magazines

    Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table

     Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table  They look like something Picasso dreamed up on a bet, but fish fans say they taste wonderful.

    Ocean City local Dave Fuschillo had high hopes of bringing in some keepers this week, when he planned to spend an afternoon in the back bay around 17th Street casting for summer flounder.



Cool Scoops is where doo-wop meets dessert

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Paul and Lori Russo enjoy collecting items from the 1950s and ’60s to decorate their Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood. Paul and Lori Russo enjoy collecting items from the 1950s and ’60s to decorate their Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood.

At Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood, the ’50s style cars and décor are almost as cool as the ice cream sundaes and novelties served up daily. The old-time parlor contains a treasure trove of memorabilia from the 1950s and ’60s.

Genuine autographs hang on every wall, ranging from the Beatles, Marilyn Monroe and Elvis to the casts of “Happy Days,” “Lavern and Shirley,” “Gilligan’s Island” and “Star Trek.”

“There’s something for everyone,” said owner and collector Paul Russo, whose collection adorns almost every inch of the nearly 3,000-square-foot shop. A special wall is dedicated to the musical history of the Wildwoods.

The Cool Scoops franchise was created and designed by the Paul and his wife, Lori, in 2002.

“We wanted our visitors to take a step back in time to the fabulous ’50s, and I think we achieved our goals,” Russo said.

Cool Scoops made its national TV debut in 2006 on “Trading Spaces,” followed by a doo-wop episode on the Travel Channel, “Taste That Town” and “Tail Fins and Chrome,” and filming wrapped up recently for a new episode on the Travel Channel that will air June 2012, he said.

Celebrating their 10th anniversary summer, the Russos have added even more items to their menu. The Hot Wheel Waffle and the You’re a Good Waffle, Charlie Brownie now join the Cone-Oli, a cone filled with cannoli cream and the Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Fudge Sundae.

Mainstays like the Scoop-Deville, Lil Deuce Scoops, Dusty Road Sundae,

Kryptonite Sundae, Abbott and Cone-Stello and the Elvis Pretzelly are customer favorites, he said.

Lunch menu items include Sha-Na-Nachos, Leave it to Pizza, the DooWoper,

Big Mack the Knife, Howdy Doody Dog and the Hound Dog.

Lori Russo said the shop offers items for those who have food allergies.

“We cater to all visitors with allergies – peanut, dairy and gluten, to be exact. We want everyone to be able to have fun here,” she said.

Her husband adds new items and events every year and has plans for a drive-in movie – actually a sit-in movie – are in the works for 2012.

Cool Scoops is at 12th Avenue and New Jersey Avenue. For information call (609) SAY-COOL (729-2665) or see www.coolscoops.com.

 


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