• Summer Magazines

    Willis Allen (he says he just goes by Junior) and his brother Tony search for some early fruit at the Allen Family Farm this week. The blueberries should be going strong soon A visit to Carol Ann Allen’s farm this time of year is a lesson in potential.

    Fields surround her big white farmhouse on a dirt road in Belleplain. Some tomatoes and pumpkins…

  • Summer Magazines

     Doc Adams Through this season, in this space, readers have been enticed, cajoled and nagged to eat local food, and lots of it.

    Not this week.

    Instead, we’ll talk about what once was, and why it’s changed. And why one of the favorite fish for many anglers is now more or less off the menu.

  • Summer Magazines

     pumpkin Almost everything about a pumpkin – the color, the taste, its very presence on almost every other doorstep – says fall is here. They line roadside stands, decorate classrooms, and get carved into a million shapes for Halloween.

    Somehow, those big orange decorations are related to the pumpkin flavor found in pies and seasonal specialty coffees, but it seems as though very few people have witnessed the process of turning a fresh pumpkin into dinner or dessert.

  • Summer Magazines

     Steve Bradley shows off some of the fruit from his backyard shrub. He said it’s at least 50 years old, maybe close to 100, and seems to be going strong. Figs are said to be one of the first plants humans ever cultivated, apparently beating out staples like wheat and rye by a good measure. Ancient texts mention the fruit from thousands of years before…

  • Summer Magazines

    For strawberries, red means go One of the highlights of summer eating is now ready

    There’s no avoiding the conclusion that strawberries want to be eaten.

    Look at it this way; they don’t exactly hide, do they? At least when they are ready and ripe.

  • Summer Magazines

    Here’s one for Joe and Joanne Sixpack. 

    You know, regular folks. The common people. Those with taste.

    Let’s face it, beer gets a bad rap. Its reputation has improved in recent years, but for many, the world’s first alcoholic brew, and the most popular, is shorthand for plebian tastes. Think of Homer (Simpson, not the Illiad author) downing Duff Beer while sitting in the kitchen in his underwear.

  • Summer Magazines

    crabs While the flavor is beloved, and many see a pile of steamed crabs, a nutcracker, a table full of friends and a cooler of beer as a vision of shore heaven, there is no denying they are, at first glace, not exactly the most appetizing creatures.

    An earlier column in this series referred to the red of a ripe strawberry as an invitation. Hardshell blue crabs offer no such invitation. Instead, they seem to make a pretty straightforward case to be left alone.

  • Summer Magazines

     eggplant

    It’s as Italian as parmigiana, as French as ratatouille, and as Arab as baba ghanoush, without even getting started on moussaka, Szechuan-style eggplant and garlic sauce or a few dozen Indian dishes.

    In other words, eggplant tastes like home to a huge swath of humanity, under many names and many, many different kinds of spices.

  • Summer Magazines

    green beansWhen most folks think of organic farming, they tend to focus on the stuff added to a field that kills things, not what’s added to make things grow.

    The connection is clear and – for some – fairly visceral. Pesticides kill bugs, herbicides kill weeds and fungicides kill fungus, allowing the plants we like to eat to thrive. But many people question what happens when we eat the crops that have been treated with chemicals designed to kill, even if they are said to be harmless if used as directed.

    Others wonder what happens to the…

  • Summer Magazines

     pizza So it’s unequivocally late summer. Garden ripe tomatoes are piling up in offices, being traded back and forth among neighbors and co-workers like the seashells of the Trobriand Islanders, only with an expiration date.

    Roving bands of teenagers are forcing brown bags of enormous zucchini on unsuspecting passers-by.

    And while we’re nowhere near out of topics, we’ve covered a lot of ground in this space already, exploring the variety of fresh, local food available to anyone who wants to look for it.




Cool Scoops is where doo-wop meets dessert

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Paul and Lori Russo enjoy collecting items from the 1950s and ’60s to decorate their Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood. Paul and Lori Russo enjoy collecting items from the 1950s and ’60s to decorate their Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood.

At Cool Scoops Ice Cream Parlor in North Wildwood, the ’50s style cars and décor are almost as cool as the ice cream sundaes and novelties served up daily. The old-time parlor contains a treasure trove of memorabilia from the 1950s and ’60s.

Genuine autographs hang on every wall, ranging from the Beatles, Marilyn Monroe and Elvis to the casts of “Happy Days,” “Lavern and Shirley,” “Gilligan’s Island” and “Star Trek.”

“There’s something for everyone,” said owner and collector Paul Russo, whose collection adorns almost every inch of the nearly 3,000-square-foot shop. A special wall is dedicated to the musical history of the Wildwoods.

The Cool Scoops franchise was created and designed by the Paul and his wife, Lori, in 2002.

“We wanted our visitors to take a step back in time to the fabulous ’50s, and I think we achieved our goals,” Russo said.

Cool Scoops made its national TV debut in 2006 on “Trading Spaces,” followed by a doo-wop episode on the Travel Channel, “Taste That Town” and “Tail Fins and Chrome,” and filming wrapped up recently for a new episode on the Travel Channel that will air June 2012, he said.

Celebrating their 10th anniversary summer, the Russos have added even more items to their menu. The Hot Wheel Waffle and the You’re a Good Waffle, Charlie Brownie now join the Cone-Oli, a cone filled with cannoli cream and the Hunka Hunka Burnin’ Fudge Sundae.

Mainstays like the Scoop-Deville, Lil Deuce Scoops, Dusty Road Sundae,

Kryptonite Sundae, Abbott and Cone-Stello and the Elvis Pretzelly are customer favorites, he said.

Lunch menu items include Sha-Na-Nachos, Leave it to Pizza, the DooWoper,

Big Mack the Knife, Howdy Doody Dog and the Hound Dog.

Lori Russo said the shop offers items for those who have food allergies.

“We cater to all visitors with allergies – peanut, dairy and gluten, to be exact. We want everyone to be able to have fun here,” she said.

Her husband adds new items and events every year and has plans for a drive-in movie – actually a sit-in movie – are in the works for 2012.

Cool Scoops is at 12th Avenue and New Jersey Avenue. For information call (609) SAY-COOL (729-2665) or see www.coolscoops.com.

 


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