• Summer Magazines

    Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table

     Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table  They look like something Picasso dreamed up on a bet, but fish fans say they taste wonderful.

    Ocean City local Dave Fuschillo had high hopes of bringing in some keepers this week, when he planned to spend an afternoon in the back bay around 17th Street casting for summer flounder.

  • Summer Magazines

    The season starts now, but it doesn’t last

    A more mature writer, in a more serious publication, could probably resist a lead like “this is the dawning of the age of asparagus.” 

    Fat chance. 

    The flowers are blooming, the days are long, and those in shorts and flip-flops no longer seem pathological. 

  • Summer Magazines

    Cape May Salts are taking offOyster

    At low tide on an overcast spring morning, James Tweed is at the beach.

    It does not look inviting.

    His white rubber boots are covered with a silty mud, and a sweatshirt – hood up – protects him from a portion of the swarms of tiny insects that seem to live solely to bury themselves in hairlines and start biting.

    On this particular morning, he’s oyster wrangling.

  • Summer Magazines

     pumpkin Almost everything about a pumpkin – the color, the taste, its very presence on almost every other doorstep – says fall is here. They line roadside stands, decorate classrooms, and get carved into a million shapes for Halloween.

    Somehow, those big orange decorations are related to the pumpkin flavor found in pies and seasonal specialty coffees, but it seems as though very few people have witnessed the process of turning a fresh pumpkin into dinner or dessert.

  • Summer Magazines

    crabs While the flavor is beloved, and many see a pile of steamed crabs, a nutcracker, a table full of friends and a cooler of beer as a vision of shore heaven, there is no denying they are, at first glace, not exactly the most appetizing creatures.

    An earlier column in this series referred to the red of a ripe strawberry as an invitation. Hardshell blue crabs offer no such invitation. Instead, they seem to make a pretty straightforward case to be left alone.

  • Summer Magazines

    Willis Allen (he says he just goes by Junior) and his brother Tony search for some early fruit at the Allen Family Farm this week. The blueberries should be going strong soon A visit to Carol Ann Allen’s farm this time of year is a lesson in potential.

    Fields surround her big white farmhouse on a dirt road in Belleplain. Some tomatoes and pumpkins…

  • Summer Magazines

    tomatoesSometimes, it seems as though there should be sort of a reverse toll at all bridges leading over the Delaware into South Jersey, with a nice old man in work trousers stopping each car.

    “Welcome to New Jersey,” he’d say. “Here’s your tomato.”

  • Summer Magazines

     Scallop-boat

    Fishing is dangerous work.

    Not that there was any doubt of that, but recent events have made it crystal clear: the men on the boats heading into the open ocean place their lives on the line to bring home the catch, and to make a living in one of the county’s biggest industries.

    This week, the Coast Guard has convened a Board of Inquiry to find out what brought down the Lady Mary March 24, the deadliest fishing accident in New Jersey in years. Of the seven crewmembers out on a multi-day scalloping trip, only…

  • Summer Magazines

    Here’s one for Joe and Joanne Sixpack. 

    You know, regular folks. The common people. Those with taste.

    Let’s face it, beer gets a bad rap. Its reputation has improved in recent years, but for many, the world’s first alcoholic brew, and the most popular, is shorthand for plebian tastes. Think of Homer (Simpson, not the Illiad author) downing Duff Beer while sitting in the kitchen in his underwear.

  • Summer Magazines

    No one ever said farming was easy: especially farmers.

    Each year is either drought or too rainy, too cold for one crop or too hot for another, and if everything cooperates, if the season is absolutely perfect, then there’s a glut and the prices drop.

    In Cape May County, the amount of land under cultivation has dwindled for years, and in many cases folks whose parents and grandparents or great grandparents were farmers have decided to find something else to do.



bottoms up> Tully Nut has been a secret for more than 40 years

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FT-BU-Tully-Nut-8-26 #1 Tavern

The Super Tully Nut is made at the #1 Tavern at First and Atlantic avenues.

But this is one drink you can’t make at home.

Only one person is said to know the secret recipe, and that’s Mark Tully, who first came up with the formula in 1969. Tully, whose real name is Romolo Leomporra, performed on Broadway and nightclubs with entertainers like Billie Holiday, Phyllis Diller and the Smothers Brothers.

He said he took the stage name of Mark Tully because he was afraid that he wouldn’t be able to get work using his own name.

After finishing a tour of the show “Bells Are Ringing” in the early 1960s, Tully came to North Wildwood and opened a small hotel. That venture eventually allowed him to buy the #1 Tavern.

The Super Tully Nut is the bar’s signature cherry-red drink, renowned for its potency and secrecy. Tully said that when he was experimenting with the formula, a few different versions were made first. There were two drinks using four liquor combinations and two drinks with five. He tested the concoctions on his family members and a few trusting employees, and they all picked what is known today as the Super Tully Nut as their favorite.

The one they chose is made with a combination of five different liquors – but Tully said the way it is put together is equally important.

“I have a special room where I make it in big vats. It takes about four days for all the ingredients to marry. Each day there is something I do to it until it's finished,” he said.

In 43 years, Tully said, he has never changed the formula.

Tully said he even has a plan for the secret recipe in the event of his death.

He said he has the recipe on audio, video and written down at a location that only one other person knows. That location, he said, can only be accessed by his wife, but even she isn’t privy to the secret.

“When I die, that person will tell my wife, and she'll be able to go there and get it,” he said.

And don’t try guessing the special combinations of five potent liquors, because even if a guess happens to be right, Tully won’t tell you.

 

 

This county loves to have a good time, especially when fancy microbrews, dirty martinis or a shot of Jack are involved. Follow Freetime reporter Lauren Suit each week as she hops the local bars to drink in Cape May County’s social scene and connect with the people who shake it and serve it.


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