• Summer Magazines

     Doc Adams Through this season, in this space, readers have been enticed, cajoled and nagged to eat local food, and lots of it.

    Not this week.

    Instead, we’ll talk about what once was, and why it’s changed. And why one of the favorite fish for many anglers is now more or less off the menu.

  • Summer Magazines

    Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table

     Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table  They look like something Picasso dreamed up on a bet, but fish fans say they taste wonderful.

    Ocean City local Dave Fuschillo had high hopes of bringing in some keepers this week, when he planned to spend an afternoon in the back bay around 17th Street casting for summer flounder.

  • Summer Magazines

     Farm markets offer a direct connectionEverything you eat grew somewhere.

    In the meantime, it may have been canned, frozen, broiled, fried or processed beyond recognition, but somewhere, at some time, the last bite you’ve taken was alive, growing, in a field or a hothouse or a pen or a bay.

    It’s funny how easy that can be to forget.

  • Summer Magazines

    No one ever said farming was easy: especially farmers.

    Each year is either drought or too rainy, too cold for one crop or too hot for another, and if everything cooperates, if the season is absolutely perfect, then there’s a glut and the prices drop.

    In Cape May County, the amount of land under cultivation has dwindled for years, and in many cases folks whose parents and grandparents or great grandparents were farmers have decided to find something else to do.

  • Summer Magazines

    Economy and trend meet in canning revival

    It’s late summer, and for now we are awash in fresh, local food. Markets, produce counters and your neighbor’s garden overflow with tomatoes, squash and other goodies, but the leaves are falling and the first cold snap can’t be too far away.

    If only there were some way of preserving these summer flavors for the winter.

  • Summer Magazines

    Willis Allen (he says he just goes by Junior) and his brother Tony search for some early fruit at the Allen Family Farm this week. The blueberries should be going strong soon A visit to Carol Ann Allen’s farm this time of year is a lesson in potential.

    Fields surround her big white farmhouse on a dirt road in Belleplain. Some tomatoes and pumpkins…

  • Summer Magazines

     pumpkin Almost everything about a pumpkin – the color, the taste, its very presence on almost every other doorstep – says fall is here. They line roadside stands, decorate classrooms, and get carved into a million shapes for Halloween.

    Somehow, those big orange decorations are related to the pumpkin flavor found in pies and seasonal specialty coffees, but it seems as though very few people have witnessed the process of turning a fresh pumpkin into dinner or dessert.

  • Summer Magazines

     eggplant

    It’s as Italian as parmigiana, as French as ratatouille, and as Arab as baba ghanoush, without even getting started on moussaka, Szechuan-style eggplant and garlic sauce or a few dozen Indian dishes.

    In other words, eggplant tastes like home to a huge swath of humanity, under many names and many, many different kinds of spices.

  • Summer Magazines

    crabs While the flavor is beloved, and many see a pile of steamed crabs, a nutcracker, a table full of friends and a cooler of beer as a vision of shore heaven, there is no denying they are, at first glace, not exactly the most appetizing creatures.

    An earlier column in this series referred to the red of a ripe strawberry as an invitation. Hardshell blue crabs offer no such invitation. Instead, they seem to make a pretty straightforward case to be left alone.

  • Summer Magazines

    Bill Eisele and his grandson Luke Eisele get ready to remove the honey from frames collected from one of his several bee hives.

    Bill Eisele does not seem particularly worried about stings.

    It’s getting on sunset at his Christmas tree farm in Petersburg, and he’s checking a hive, protected only by a short-sleeved golf shirt and a couple decades’ worth of experience working around bees. No smoking, no mesh hood, no apparent concern.




Bottoms Up > Spell it whisky or whiskey, but sniff, sip and savor it

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Whisky is best tasted neat in a tulip-shaped glass, according to David Blackmore of the Glenmorangie distillery. Whisky is best tasted neat in a tulip-shaped glass, according to David Blackmore of the Glenmorangie distillery.

Most people think the spelling is the least important thing about drinking whisky. After all, one need not pass a spelling test before being permitted to buy a wee dram at the pub.

But the addition, or omission, of that “E” has caused some controversy, according to David Blackmore, a master brand ambassador for the Glenmorangie distillery in Tain, Scotland, and the head of its educational program.

Blackmore said the rule depends on where in the world the spirits are bought.

“All scotch is whisky. But not all whisky or whiskey is scotch,” he said.

The spelling of whisky – or whiskey – differs geographically. As a rule, Americans and the Irish prefer whiskey. Scots, Canadians and the rest of the world’s single-malt makers prefer whisky, he said.

Blackmore, who is from Scotland and a professional whisky tutor with a background at the Scotch Malt Whisky Society in Scotland and London, will be at the Inn of Cape May Saturday, Sept. 24 for a Scotch tasting and dinner to teach whisky connoisseurs and newbies the nuisances of the spirit.

But if you want to prepare beforehand, or maybe just impress the expert, here are a few things that might be good to know.

Blackmore said that during the 19th century, Scotch whisky was generally viewed as being low quality. For exportation to America, Irish distillers wanted to differentiate their product from the poorer Scotch whisky, so they added the “E” to the name in an effort to create a distinction.

Even today, with Scotch whisky becoming perhaps one of the world’s greatest spirits, the spelling still differs. Americans still spell their spirit with an “E,” though the legal spelling is whisky. A few distillers, Maker’s Mark and George Dickel, for example, prefer the Scottish spelling.

Scotch on the rocks is a classic drink. But what whisky counts as Scotch?

Well, no surprise there: to be classified as Scotch, a whisky must be made in Scotland.

According to Blackmore, to legally be called a single malt Scotch, the whisky must be distilled at a single distillery in Scotland, in a copper pot still from nothing other than malted barley, yeast and water. It must then be aged in an oak cask for at least three years and a day, and it has to have an alcohol content of at least 40 percent.

Any whisky with the word “single” on its label has been made in one distillery only. A blend is a mixture of whiskies from different distilleries. Whiskies from a single source are sold under the name of the distillery that produced them, and blended whiskies are sold under brand names, such as Chivas Regal, Dewar’s or The Famous Grouse.

Malt whisky is made from malted barley only, whereas grain whisky is made from other cereals, such as wheat or maize. Most grain whiskies are used in blends.

When it comes to drinking, purists may scream silently when they see someone adding water to their whisky, Blackmore said – and some may even scream out loud, he joked.

However, there is a reason some whisky drinkers prefer a splash of water instead of having their drink “neat,” or straight, he said.

The water fulfils two functions: It can make the whisky easier to drink, and it may open up the whisky and release a great deal more flavor and aroma. Adding ice is said to freeze the taste and aroma of the liquor and dull the experience of drinking it, he said.

“In Scotland, you won’t find people putting ice in their single malt very often. It’s just not something that has been traditionally acceptable. I don’t think that means that drinking your single malt on the rocks is wrong. It’s simply a response to the climate you live in,” he said.

When it comes to tasting, Blackmore said he keeps it simple.

“A good tulip-shaped nosing glass is essential to get the most aromas and flavors out of your single malt,” he said.

Blackmore said he always samples whisky neat, nosing and tasting it and noting the various flavors and aromas.

“I will then add a drop of room temperature bottled water and repeat the process of nosing and tasting. Water acts on the whisky to open up the range of aromas and flavors, and amplify the floral perfumed notes in particular,” he said.

Regardless of how one enjoys his or her whisky, Blackmore said three steps should be followed:

First, smell the whisky before drinking it. Taste and smell are closely related senses, and smell is essential to the enjoyment of good food and drink.

Next, sip the whisky. Don’t gulp. Swirl each mouthful around the palate to appreciate all the subtleties of flavor.

Finally, savor the whisky. Whisky is best enjoyed with time between each sip to appreciate its finish.

Blackmore will lead a tasting of Glenmorangie Single Malt Scotch Whisky accompanied by a four-course meal 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 at the Inn of Cape May, 7 Ocean Street, Cape May.

Admission for the tasting and dinner, sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts and Humanities, is $75 per person.

For information or to make reservations call (609) 884-5404 or see www.capemaymac.org.

 

This county loves to have a good time, especially when fancy microbrews, dirty martinis or a shot of Jack are involved. Follow Freetime reporter Lauren Suit each week as she hops the local bars to drink in Cape May County’s social scene and connect with the people who shake it and serve it.

:  Glenmorangie whisky is aged 10 years in the distillery in Tain, Scotland, founded in 1843. : Glenmorangie whisky is aged 10 years in the distillery in Tain, Scotland, founded in 1843.

David Blackmore, a professional whisky tutor, will lead a whisky tasting and dinner 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 at the Inn of Cape May. David Blackmore, a professional whisky tutor, will lead a whisky tasting and dinner 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 at the Inn of Cape May.

 


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