• Summer Magazines

    The season starts now, but it doesn’t last

    A more mature writer, in a more serious publication, could probably resist a lead like “this is the dawning of the age of asparagus.” 

    Fat chance. 

    The flowers are blooming, the days are long, and those in shorts and flip-flops no longer seem pathological. 

  • Summer Magazines

    crabs While the flavor is beloved, and many see a pile of steamed crabs, a nutcracker, a table full of friends and a cooler of beer as a vision of shore heaven, there is no denying they are, at first glace, not exactly the most appetizing creatures.

    An earlier column in this series referred to the red of a ripe strawberry as an invitation. Hardshell blue crabs offer no such invitation. Instead, they seem to make a pretty straightforward case to be left alone.

  • Summer Magazines

    Corny ramblings for a late-summer feast

    When it comes to corn, are you a typewriter or a lathe?

    For the digital natives who may happen to read this, a typewriter used to have a little roller that held the paper, which would advance one letter at a time until the carriage was returned, and the type proceeded to the next line. Yes, it was a pain, but still a step up from engraving everything on stone tablets.

    So for corn on the cob, a typewriter eats one line…

  • Summer Magazines

     Steve Bradley shows off some of the fruit from his backyard shrub. He said it’s at least 50 years old, maybe close to 100, and seems to be going strong. Figs are said to be one of the first plants humans ever cultivated, apparently beating out staples like wheat and rye by a good measure. Ancient texts mention the fruit from thousands of years before…

  • Summer Magazines

    Here’s one for Joe and Joanne Sixpack. 

    You know, regular folks. The common people. Those with taste.

    Let’s face it, beer gets a bad rap. Its reputation has improved in recent years, but for many, the world’s first alcoholic brew, and the most popular, is shorthand for plebian tastes. Think of Homer (Simpson, not the Illiad author) downing Duff Beer while sitting in the kitchen in his underwear.

  • Summer Magazines

    Cape May Salts are taking offOyster

    At low tide on an overcast spring morning, James Tweed is at the beach.

    It does not look inviting.

    His white rubber boots are covered with a silty mud, and a sweatshirt – hood up – protects him from a portion of the swarms of tiny insects that seem to live solely to bury themselves in hairlines and start biting.

    On this particular morning, he’s oyster wrangling.

  • Summer Magazines

     Scallop-boat

    Fishing is dangerous work.

    Not that there was any doubt of that, but recent events have made it crystal clear: the men on the boats heading into the open ocean place their lives on the line to bring home the catch, and to make a living in one of the county’s biggest industries.

    This week, the Coast Guard has convened a Board of Inquiry to find out what brought down the Lady Mary March 24, the deadliest fishing accident in New Jersey in years. Of the seven crewmembers out on a multi-day scalloping trip, only…

  • Summer Magazines

    beach plums Beach plums are nothing new.

    For generations, locals have gathered the small, tart plums along roadsides and in the dunes, mostly for jellies and jams.

    The fruit is much smaller than the European or Asian plums, to which it is related, and when ripe can range in size from about a pea, to a Bing cherry, or the size of a grape tomato for a really big one.

  • Summer Magazines

    Economy and trend meet in canning revival

    It’s late summer, and for now we are awash in fresh, local food. Markets, produce counters and your neighbor’s garden overflow with tomatoes, squash and other goodies, but the leaves are falling and the first cold snap can’t be too far away.

    If only there were some way of preserving these summer flavors for the winter.

  • Summer Magazines

    For strawberries, red means go One of the highlights of summer eating is now ready

    There’s no avoiding the conclusion that strawberries want to be eaten.

    Look at it this way; they don’t exactly hide, do they? At least when they are ready and ripe.




One Fish, Two Fish brings new flavors to ‘restaurant row’

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

The heirloom tomato stack appetizer at One Fish Two Fish is an example of the chef’s focus on local seasonal produce. The heirloom tomato stack appetizer at One Fish Two Fish is an example of the chef’s focus on local seasonal produce.  A new Wildwood Crest restaurant is putting a trendy spin on some dining classics.

One Fish, Two Fish Restaurant at 5290 Pacific Ave. had its “soft opening” a few weeks ago.

“We’re creating dishes people are familiar with, but with a little twist,” said chef and co-owner Ryan Allenbach.

For example, the surf and turf is what Allenbach called semitraditional – it’s a play on scallops wrapped in bacon, but instead of bacon the seared scallops are served with pork belly, which is taken from the same cut of meat, he said. But what sets it apart is the sauce, which is aerated to produce a light, foamy sauce.

The smoked tomato marinara served with the crispy calamari appetizer and the gulf shrimp cioppino entrée, is made with tomatoes that have been smoked on the stove top, Allenbach said.

“No one is making their marina sauce like that,” he said.

The restaurant, which is named after the children’s book “One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish” by Dr. Seuss, reflects the restaurant’s imaginative dishes, Allenbach said.

“It’s playful, and I think a lot of our food is playful,” he said.

In the restaurant’s “deconstructed cocktail sauce,” for example, the tomato and horseradish are separated on the plate, and patrons can mix the two together to their desired taste.

“I have no problem with playing with your food,” the chef said.

Allenbach said that while many of his dishes play with different textures or unexpected flavors, his touch is more delicate than techniques involved in molecular gastronomy, a modern style of cooking that uses technical innovations to create transformed dishes.

“We’re subtle,” Allenbach said. “There’s no tank of liquid nitrogen in the back.”

Allenbach said he is also taking advantage of the fresh produce and seafood common to South Jersey.

“We have great produce and great seafood in this area,” he said, “and that is what will make a dish great.”

Everything on the menu, including the desserts, vinaigrettes and sauces, is homemade, he said.

“Nothing comes through the kitchen door that isn’t made from scratch.”

Allenbach met his partner, Brian Schroeder, when they were pumping gas together in high school.

Both are from Medford and went on to become chefs, but this is their first cooking venture together.

Allenbach said fine dining is uncommon in Wildwood, where many restaurants are focused on family dining. But despite some of his concerns that the food would be “too out there” for Wildwood, he said the response has been “positive so far.”

The good reception could be in part due to the efforts to revitalize Pacific Avenue, particularly with regard to dining. Restaurants such as Juan Pablo’s Margarita Bar and Gia Ristorante have become staples on Pacific Avenue, while new restaurants like Goodfish Grille and Cattle ’n Clover have helped the strip live up to its nickname, restaurant row.

“Wildwood is no joke in the food scene,” Allenbach said. “We’re right there with Cape May.”

One Fish, Two Fish is open 4-10 p.m. daily. For information or to make a reservation call 609-522-5223.

Surf and turf at One Fish Two Fish features an air-emulsified foam sauce, which the chefs say is a personal twist on a classic. Surf and turf at One Fish Two Fish features an air-emulsified foam sauce, which the chefs say is a personal twist on a classic.

Chefs Ryan Allenbach and Brian Schroeder are the operators of Fish Two Fish in Wildwood Crest. Chefs Ryan Allenbach and Brian Schroeder are the operators of Fish Two Fish in Wildwood Crest.


blog comments powered by Disqus