• Summer Magazines

    Some say the berry you wait for tastes best

    So maybe you’ve been feeling pretty pleased with yourself. After all, you’ve switched over to organic greens now that they are pre-washed and easy to use, and you’ve traded sausage and bacon for the frozen simulated stuff in the green box. Maybe you even recycle the box. 

    Then suddenly, one of your friends goes localvore. 

    Here we go again.

  • Summer Magazines

     Steve Bradley shows off some of the fruit from his backyard shrub. He said it’s at least 50 years old, maybe close to 100, and seems to be going strong. Figs are said to be one of the first plants humans ever cultivated, apparently beating out staples like wheat and rye by a good measure. Ancient texts mention the fruit from thousands of years before…

  • Summer Magazines

    Corny ramblings for a late-summer feast

    When it comes to corn, are you a typewriter or a lathe?

    For the digital natives who may happen to read this, a typewriter used to have a little roller that held the paper, which would advance one letter at a time until the carriage was returned, and the type proceeded to the next line. Yes, it was a pain, but still a step up from engraving everything on stone tablets.

    So for corn on the cob, a typewriter eats one line…

  • Summer Magazines

     Doc Adams Through this season, in this space, readers have been enticed, cajoled and nagged to eat local food, and lots of it.

    Not this week.

    Instead, we’ll talk about what once was, and why it’s changed. And why one of the favorite fish for many anglers is now more or less off the menu.

  • Summer Magazines

    Willis Allen (he says he just goes by Junior) and his brother Tony search for some early fruit at the Allen Family Farm this week. The blueberries should be going strong soon A visit to Carol Ann Allen’s farm this time of year is a lesson in potential.

    Fields surround her big white farmhouse on a dirt road in Belleplain. Some tomatoes and pumpkins…

  • Summer Magazines

     Liz Anderson, AKA the Egg Lady, with son Daniel and a dozen blue-green eggs. She sells her extra eggs from her front porch on Route 50 in Tuckahoe.  Growing up on her dad’s farm in Upper Township, Liz Anderson knows chickens.

    So it seemed natural that she and her husband, Tom, would keep a few at their place in Tuckahoe for the eggs.

    “We always ate…

  • Summer Magazines

     pizza So it’s unequivocally late summer. Garden ripe tomatoes are piling up in offices, being traded back and forth among neighbors and co-workers like the seashells of the Trobriand Islanders, only with an expiration date.

    Roving bands of teenagers are forcing brown bags of enormous zucchini on unsuspecting passers-by.

    And while we’re nowhere near out of topics, we’ve covered a lot of ground in this space already, exploring the variety of fresh, local food available to anyone who wants to look for it.

  • Summer Magazines

    No one ever said farming was easy: especially farmers.

    Each year is either drought or too rainy, too cold for one crop or too hot for another, and if everything cooperates, if the season is absolutely perfect, then there’s a glut and the prices drop.

    In Cape May County, the amount of land under cultivation has dwindled for years, and in many cases folks whose parents and grandparents or great grandparents were farmers have decided to find something else to do.

  • Summer Magazines

     eggplant

    It’s as Italian as parmigiana, as French as ratatouille, and as Arab as baba ghanoush, without even getting started on moussaka, Szechuan-style eggplant and garlic sauce or a few dozen Indian dishes.

    In other words, eggplant tastes like home to a huge swath of humanity, under many names and many, many different kinds of spices.

  • Summer Magazines

     Rob, Catherine and Karl Giulian join their dad, Karl Giulian, to talk about backyard gardens. The youngest, David, is not pictured.  Karl Giulian can’t wait for his kids to get older.

    He’s looking forward to it for all the usual reasons of course, but there’s an ulterior motive as well. The swing set is in the way of his garden expansion.

    His 12-foot-by-12-foot garden has already slipped its borders, with potted colonies…




Here’s a treat that beats the heat > Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops

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In the summer, especially during weather like the recent heat waves, turning on the oven to bake a cake is one of the last things many people want to do.

So what is a dessert-loving family to do?

Lindsay Landis, author of a new book, “The Cookie Dough Lover’s Cookbook,” says there is no need for an oven to create crowd-pleasing summer treats; all that is needed is a little ingenuity.

“On hot days, my mind usually turns to frozen treats such as popsicles or sorbet; for something a bit more elegant I'll whip up a chocolate ganache tart with cookie crust,” she said.

Landis has created more than 50 recipes using egg-free cookie dough that is safe to eat raw.

By repurposing favorite desserts for the summer season, cooks can take the need for heat out of the equation, she said. For example, those who love pie may want to consider a graham cracker, whipped cream and candied fruit-based dessert that can be created in minutes and served cold.

One of the best things about summer is the abundance of fresh fruit. No matter what is on the menu, adding a garnish of tropical fresh fruit like kiwi, pineapple and mango can give any dish a boost of natural sweetness. Consider a parfait of frozen yogurt, fresh strawberries and nuts, for example.

For a bit of inspiration, try the easy recipe below for Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops, a no-bake summer treat concocted by Landis.

For more no-bake dessert ideas see www.cookiedoughlovers.com. 

Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops

1 1/4 cups milk (skim, 2 percent or whole)
1/3 cup light brown sugar, packed
Pinch salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons mini-semisweet chocolate chips

In a microwave-safe container or glass measuring cup, microwave milk for 30 seconds or until warm. Add brown sugar and salt and stir until dissolved. Add vanilla.

Place 1/2 tablespoon chocolate chips in the bottom of each of four 1/3-cup ice-pop molds or small paper cups. Top each with milk mixture.

Insert sticks and place molds in freezer. Freeze until solid, at least three hours.

To release the pop, run the mold under warm water for a few seconds; the pop should slide right out. If using paper cups, simply peel away the cup and discard.

If the ice-pop mold being used does not have built-in sticks or a lid to hold them in place, keep the sticks upright by stretching a layer of plastic wrap over the top of the mold and securing it with a rubber band. Cut a small slit in the plastic, centered over each pop, and insert a stick through each opening.

Alternatively, adjust sticks as necessary after about 45 minutes of freezing, when the pops aren’t yet frozen solid.

Makes four pops.

Courtesy of Statepoint.net


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