• Summer Magazines

    tomatoesSometimes, it seems as though there should be sort of a reverse toll at all bridges leading over the Delaware into South Jersey, with a nice old man in work trousers stopping each car.

    “Welcome to New Jersey,” he’d say. “Here’s your tomato.”

  • Summer Magazines

     eggplant

    It’s as Italian as parmigiana, as French as ratatouille, and as Arab as baba ghanoush, without even getting started on moussaka, Szechuan-style eggplant and garlic sauce or a few dozen Indian dishes.

    In other words, eggplant tastes like home to a huge swath of humanity, under many names and many, many different kinds of spices.

  • Summer Magazines

    Cape May Salts are taking offOyster

    At low tide on an overcast spring morning, James Tweed is at the beach.

    It does not look inviting.

    His white rubber boots are covered with a silty mud, and a sweatshirt – hood up – protects him from a portion of the swarms of tiny insects that seem to live solely to bury themselves in hairlines and start biting.

    On this particular morning, he’s oyster wrangling.

  • Summer Magazines

    beach plums Beach plums are nothing new.

    For generations, locals have gathered the small, tart plums along roadsides and in the dunes, mostly for jellies and jams.

    The fruit is much smaller than the European or Asian plums, to which it is related, and when ripe can range in size from about a pea, to a Bing cherry, or the size of a grape tomato for a really big one.

  • Summer Magazines

    crabs While the flavor is beloved, and many see a pile of steamed crabs, a nutcracker, a table full of friends and a cooler of beer as a vision of shore heaven, there is no denying they are, at first glace, not exactly the most appetizing creatures.

    An earlier column in this series referred to the red of a ripe strawberry as an invitation. Hardshell blue crabs offer no such invitation. Instead, they seem to make a pretty straightforward case to be left alone.

  • Summer Magazines

     spinach You can’t talk about spinach without talking about Popeye, says Ken Thompson, a farmer with a spread out in Tuckahoe.

    It’s a late weekend afternoon, and Thompson is not working on spinach; he’s weeding strawberries, giving the now flowering patch a fighting chance against the competition. In this case, it’s an enormous variety of grasses, stalks, thistles and ivies. Dandelions ready their parachute seeds on white heads, while another shade of green in the tangle explodes on contact, sending a burst of seeds forcefully into the air.

  • Summer Magazines

    Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table

     Dave Fuschillo takes fluke from the bay to the table  They look like something Picasso dreamed up on a bet, but fish fans say they taste wonderful.

    Ocean City local Dave Fuschillo had high hopes of bringing in some keepers this week, when he planned to spend an afternoon in the back bay around 17th Street casting for summer flounder.

  • Summer Magazines

     Rob, Catherine and Karl Giulian join their dad, Karl Giulian, to talk about backyard gardens. The youngest, David, is not pictured.  Karl Giulian can’t wait for his kids to get older.

    He’s looking forward to it for all the usual reasons of course, but there’s an ulterior motive as well. The swing set is in the way of his garden expansion.

    His 12-foot-by-12-foot garden has already slipped its borders, with potted colonies…

  • Summer Magazines

    Here’s one for Joe and Joanne Sixpack. 

    You know, regular folks. The common people. Those with taste.

    Let’s face it, beer gets a bad rap. Its reputation has improved in recent years, but for many, the world’s first alcoholic brew, and the most popular, is shorthand for plebian tastes. Think of Homer (Simpson, not the Illiad author) downing Duff Beer while sitting in the kitchen in his underwear.

  • Summer Magazines

    The season starts now, but it doesn’t last

    A more mature writer, in a more serious publication, could probably resist a lead like “this is the dawning of the age of asparagus.” 

    Fat chance. 

    The flowers are blooming, the days are long, and those in shorts and flip-flops no longer seem pathological. 



Here’s a treat that beats the heat > Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops

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In the summer, especially during weather like the recent heat waves, turning on the oven to bake a cake is one of the last things many people want to do.

So what is a dessert-loving family to do?

Lindsay Landis, author of a new book, “The Cookie Dough Lover’s Cookbook,” says there is no need for an oven to create crowd-pleasing summer treats; all that is needed is a little ingenuity.

“On hot days, my mind usually turns to frozen treats such as popsicles or sorbet; for something a bit more elegant I'll whip up a chocolate ganache tart with cookie crust,” she said.

Landis has created more than 50 recipes using egg-free cookie dough that is safe to eat raw.

By repurposing favorite desserts for the summer season, cooks can take the need for heat out of the equation, she said. For example, those who love pie may want to consider a graham cracker, whipped cream and candied fruit-based dessert that can be created in minutes and served cold.

One of the best things about summer is the abundance of fresh fruit. No matter what is on the menu, adding a garnish of tropical fresh fruit like kiwi, pineapple and mango can give any dish a boost of natural sweetness. Consider a parfait of frozen yogurt, fresh strawberries and nuts, for example.

For a bit of inspiration, try the easy recipe below for Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops, a no-bake summer treat concocted by Landis.

For more no-bake dessert ideas see www.cookiedoughlovers.com. 

Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops

1 1/4 cups milk (skim, 2 percent or whole)
1/3 cup light brown sugar, packed
Pinch salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons mini-semisweet chocolate chips

In a microwave-safe container or glass measuring cup, microwave milk for 30 seconds or until warm. Add brown sugar and salt and stir until dissolved. Add vanilla.

Place 1/2 tablespoon chocolate chips in the bottom of each of four 1/3-cup ice-pop molds or small paper cups. Top each with milk mixture.

Insert sticks and place molds in freezer. Freeze until solid, at least three hours.

To release the pop, run the mold under warm water for a few seconds; the pop should slide right out. If using paper cups, simply peel away the cup and discard.

If the ice-pop mold being used does not have built-in sticks or a lid to hold them in place, keep the sticks upright by stretching a layer of plastic wrap over the top of the mold and securing it with a rubber band. Cut a small slit in the plastic, centered over each pop, and insert a stick through each opening.

Alternatively, adjust sticks as necessary after about 45 minutes of freezing, when the pops aren’t yet frozen solid.

Makes four pops.

Courtesy of Statepoint.net


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