• Summer Magazines

    Willis Allen (he says he just goes by Junior) and his brother Tony search for some early fruit at the Allen Family Farm this week. The blueberries should be going strong soon A visit to Carol Ann Allen’s farm this time of year is a lesson in potential.

    Fields surround her big white farmhouse on a dirt road in Belleplain. Some tomatoes and pumpkins…

  • Summer Magazines

     Farm markets offer a direct connectionEverything you eat grew somewhere.

    In the meantime, it may have been canned, frozen, broiled, fried or processed beyond recognition, but somewhere, at some time, the last bite you’ve taken was alive, growing, in a field or a hothouse or a pen or a bay.

    It’s funny how easy that can be to forget.

  • Summer Magazines

    Here’s one for Joe and Joanne Sixpack. 

    You know, regular folks. The common people. Those with taste.

    Let’s face it, beer gets a bad rap. Its reputation has improved in recent years, but for many, the world’s first alcoholic brew, and the most popular, is shorthand for plebian tastes. Think of Homer (Simpson, not the Illiad author) downing Duff Beer while sitting in the kitchen in his underwear.

  • Summer Magazines

     pizza So it’s unequivocally late summer. Garden ripe tomatoes are piling up in offices, being traded back and forth among neighbors and co-workers like the seashells of the Trobriand Islanders, only with an expiration date.

    Roving bands of teenagers are forcing brown bags of enormous zucchini on unsuspecting passers-by.

    And while we’re nowhere near out of topics, we’ve covered a lot of ground in this space already, exploring the variety of fresh, local food available to anyone who wants to look for it.

  • Summer Magazines

    For strawberries, red means go One of the highlights of summer eating is now ready

    There’s no avoiding the conclusion that strawberries want to be eaten.

    Look at it this way; they don’t exactly hide, do they? At least when they are ready and ripe.

  • Summer Magazines

    Corny ramblings for a late-summer feast

    When it comes to corn, are you a typewriter or a lathe?

    For the digital natives who may happen to read this, a typewriter used to have a little roller that held the paper, which would advance one letter at a time until the carriage was returned, and the type proceeded to the next line. Yes, it was a pain, but still a step up from engraving everything on stone tablets.

    So for corn on the cob, a typewriter eats one line…

  • Summer Magazines

    Economy and trend meet in canning revival

    It’s late summer, and for now we are awash in fresh, local food. Markets, produce counters and your neighbor’s garden overflow with tomatoes, squash and other goodies, but the leaves are falling and the first cold snap can’t be too far away.

    If only there were some way of preserving these summer flavors for the winter.

  • Summer Magazines

    crabs While the flavor is beloved, and many see a pile of steamed crabs, a nutcracker, a table full of friends and a cooler of beer as a vision of shore heaven, there is no denying they are, at first glace, not exactly the most appetizing creatures.

    An earlier column in this series referred to the red of a ripe strawberry as an invitation. Hardshell blue crabs offer no such invitation. Instead, they seem to make a pretty straightforward case to be left alone.

  • Summer Magazines

     Liz Anderson, AKA the Egg Lady, with son Daniel and a dozen blue-green eggs. She sells her extra eggs from her front porch on Route 50 in Tuckahoe.  Growing up on her dad’s farm in Upper Township, Liz Anderson knows chickens.

    So it seemed natural that she and her husband, Tom, would keep a few at their place in Tuckahoe for the eggs.

    “We always ate…

  • Summer Magazines

     spinach You can’t talk about spinach without talking about Popeye, says Ken Thompson, a farmer with a spread out in Tuckahoe.

    It’s a late weekend afternoon, and Thompson is not working on spinach; he’s weeding strawberries, giving the now flowering patch a fighting chance against the competition. In this case, it’s an enormous variety of grasses, stalks, thistles and ivies. Dandelions ready their parachute seeds on white heads, while another shade of green in the tangle explodes on contact, sending a burst of seeds forcefully into the air.



Here’s a treat that beats the heat > Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops

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In the summer, especially during weather like the recent heat waves, turning on the oven to bake a cake is one of the last things many people want to do.

So what is a dessert-loving family to do?

Lindsay Landis, author of a new book, “The Cookie Dough Lover’s Cookbook,” says there is no need for an oven to create crowd-pleasing summer treats; all that is needed is a little ingenuity.

“On hot days, my mind usually turns to frozen treats such as popsicles or sorbet; for something a bit more elegant I'll whip up a chocolate ganache tart with cookie crust,” she said.

Landis has created more than 50 recipes using egg-free cookie dough that is safe to eat raw.

By repurposing favorite desserts for the summer season, cooks can take the need for heat out of the equation, she said. For example, those who love pie may want to consider a graham cracker, whipped cream and candied fruit-based dessert that can be created in minutes and served cold.

One of the best things about summer is the abundance of fresh fruit. No matter what is on the menu, adding a garnish of tropical fresh fruit like kiwi, pineapple and mango can give any dish a boost of natural sweetness. Consider a parfait of frozen yogurt, fresh strawberries and nuts, for example.

For a bit of inspiration, try the easy recipe below for Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops, a no-bake summer treat concocted by Landis.

For more no-bake dessert ideas see www.cookiedoughlovers.com. 

Invisible Cookie Dough Ice Pops

1 1/4 cups milk (skim, 2 percent or whole)
1/3 cup light brown sugar, packed
Pinch salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons mini-semisweet chocolate chips

In a microwave-safe container or glass measuring cup, microwave milk for 30 seconds or until warm. Add brown sugar and salt and stir until dissolved. Add vanilla.

Place 1/2 tablespoon chocolate chips in the bottom of each of four 1/3-cup ice-pop molds or small paper cups. Top each with milk mixture.

Insert sticks and place molds in freezer. Freeze until solid, at least three hours.

To release the pop, run the mold under warm water for a few seconds; the pop should slide right out. If using paper cups, simply peel away the cup and discard.

If the ice-pop mold being used does not have built-in sticks or a lid to hold them in place, keep the sticks upright by stretching a layer of plastic wrap over the top of the mold and securing it with a rubber band. Cut a small slit in the plastic, centered over each pop, and insert a stick through each opening.

Alternatively, adjust sticks as necessary after about 45 minutes of freezing, when the pops aren’t yet frozen solid.

Makes four pops.

Courtesy of Statepoint.net


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