• Summer Magazines

    For strawberries, red means go One of the highlights of summer eating is now ready

    There’s no avoiding the conclusion that strawberries want to be eaten.

    Look at it this way; they don’t exactly hide, do they? At least when they are ready and ripe.

  • Summer Magazines

     Rob, Catherine and Karl Giulian join their dad, Karl Giulian, to talk about backyard gardens. The youngest, David, is not pictured.  Karl Giulian can’t wait for his kids to get older.

    He’s looking forward to it for all the usual reasons of course, but there’s an ulterior motive as well. The swing set is in the way of his garden expansion.

    His 12-foot-by-12-foot garden has already slipped its borders, with potted colonies…

  • Summer Magazines

    Bill Eisele and his grandson Luke Eisele get ready to remove the honey from frames collected from one of his several bee hives.

    Bill Eisele does not seem particularly worried about stings.

    It’s getting on sunset at his Christmas tree farm in Petersburg, and he’s checking a hive, protected only by a short-sleeved golf shirt and a couple decades’ worth of experience working around bees. No smoking, no mesh hood, no apparent concern.

  • Summer Magazines

     spinach You can’t talk about spinach without talking about Popeye, says Ken Thompson, a farmer with a spread out in Tuckahoe.

    It’s a late weekend afternoon, and Thompson is not working on spinach; he’s weeding strawberries, giving the now flowering patch a fighting chance against the competition. In this case, it’s an enormous variety of grasses, stalks, thistles and ivies. Dandelions ready their parachute seeds on white heads, while another shade of green in the tangle explodes on contact, sending a burst of seeds forcefully into the air.

  • Summer Magazines

     pizza So it’s unequivocally late summer. Garden ripe tomatoes are piling up in offices, being traded back and forth among neighbors and co-workers like the seashells of the Trobriand Islanders, only with an expiration date.

    Roving bands of teenagers are forcing brown bags of enormous zucchini on unsuspecting passers-by.

    And while we’re nowhere near out of topics, we’ve covered a lot of ground in this space already, exploring the variety of fresh, local food available to anyone who wants to look for it.

  • Summer Magazines

    green beansWhen most folks think of organic farming, they tend to focus on the stuff added to a field that kills things, not what’s added to make things grow.

    The connection is clear and – for some – fairly visceral. Pesticides kill bugs, herbicides kill weeds and fungicides kill fungus, allowing the plants we like to eat to thrive. But many people question what happens when we eat the crops that have been treated with chemicals designed to kill, even if they are said to be harmless if used as directed.

    Others wonder what happens to the…

  • Summer Magazines

     Liz Anderson, AKA the Egg Lady, with son Daniel and a dozen blue-green eggs. She sells her extra eggs from her front porch on Route 50 in Tuckahoe.  Growing up on her dad’s farm in Upper Township, Liz Anderson knows chickens.

    So it seemed natural that she and her husband, Tom, would keep a few at their place in Tuckahoe for the eggs.

    “We always ate…

  • Summer Magazines

     pumpkin Almost everything about a pumpkin – the color, the taste, its very presence on almost every other doorstep – says fall is here. They line roadside stands, decorate classrooms, and get carved into a million shapes for Halloween.

    Somehow, those big orange decorations are related to the pumpkin flavor found in pies and seasonal specialty coffees, but it seems as though very few people have witnessed the process of turning a fresh pumpkin into dinner or dessert.

  • Summer Magazines

    Willis Allen (he says he just goes by Junior) and his brother Tony search for some early fruit at the Allen Family Farm this week. The blueberries should be going strong soon A visit to Carol Ann Allen’s farm this time of year is a lesson in potential.

    Fields surround her big white farmhouse on a dirt road in Belleplain. Some tomatoes and pumpkins…

  • Summer Magazines

     Scallop-boat

    Fishing is dangerous work.

    Not that there was any doubt of that, but recent events have made it crystal clear: the men on the boats heading into the open ocean place their lives on the line to bring home the catch, and to make a living in one of the county’s biggest industries.

    This week, the Coast Guard has convened a Board of Inquiry to find out what brought down the Lady Mary March 24, the deadliest fishing accident in New Jersey in years. Of the seven crewmembers out on a multi-day scalloping trip, only…




Easy holiday meals feature pretzel crackers

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

When entertaining during the holiday season, time is of the essence. Between cleaning, shopping, decorating and mingling with friends and family, there's hardly enough time to cook let alone prepare an elaborate seven course meal.
However, the lack of time doesn't mean your food or your guests have to suffer. By combining classic dishes with unique ingredients, you can enhance the flavor of your recipes without having to spend the entire evening in the kitchen.
Instead of preparing an over-the-top feast, try opting for simple and satisfying fare with a subtle modern twist to wow your guests.
Often, it's just that extra ingredient that can really tie together your favorite appetizers, entrees and desserts.

Jessica Segarra, of The Novice Chef food blog, offers three simple tips to create stand out dishes using her favorite better-for-you pretzel crackers to rethink your holiday recipes.
• While it's easy to get caught up in the moment, don't let the holidays sidetrack your guests from eating healthy.
Instead, make wholesome, lighter options the life of the party by adding unexpected ingredients to otherwise bland dishes.
Serve protein packed, homemade sweet potato hummus with veggies and flat-baked Pretzel Crisps(R), the perfect combination of sweet and savory flavors for fall and winter entertaining. Not only will the hummus keep your guests satisfied, it can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator until ready to serve.
• Sweet-and-savory never fails. Look for recipes that combine both elements to add a well-balance boost of flavor. This holds true for both desserts and entrees.
"Pretzels are my go-to ingredient for adding crunch and just the right amount of salty goodness to my sweeter dishes," says Segarra. "I've found Pretzel Crisps offer the most versatility when it comes to flavor and use. "They can be easily paired with my favorite holiday desserts, including beautifully layered trifles."
• Select dishes that can be prepared ahead of time. Entertaining is no fun if you're confined to the kitchen while your meal cooks. Choosing a baked entree like pork medallions or chicken breasts that can be prepped before your guests arrive can help to free you up to socialize.
Swap out bread crumbs for thin pretzel crackers and coat prior to your guests arrival.
Holiday gatherings are supposed to be fun for everyone, including the hosts. By adopting some simple time-saving secrets to make your food shine, both you and your food can be the life of the party.
Celebrate the holidays with Pretzel Crisps and these seasonally inspired recipes at your next gathering.

Everything Pretzel Crisps Crusted Pork Medallions with Sweet Maple Gravy

Makes 4 servings
Ingredients:
1 pound pork loin, sliced into 1 1/2-inch rounds
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 large eggs, whisked
3 cups Everything Pretzel Crisps, crushed
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
For the gravy:
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons maple syrup
1 cup whole milk

Directions:
Preheat oven to 425 F. Line a baking dish with foil and spray with non-stick spray. Set aside. Place flour in a shallow bowl. Place eggs in a separate shallow bowl. Spread crushed Pretzel Crisps on a rimmed plate. Working with one pork medallion at a time, coat pork in flour, dip into eggs and then press into pretzels. Repeat process until all pork medallions have been coated. Melt butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add four to five pork medallions at a time, cooking until lightly browned, about 2 minutes on each side. Transfer browned pork medallions to prepared baking dish. Repeat process until all pork medallions have been browned. Place pork medallions in the oven and bake until cooked through, or until internal temperature reaches 140 F, about 8 minutes. Let chops rest for 5 minutes after baking. While pork is in the oven, melt butter over medium-high heat in the skillet used to cook the pork. Whisk in flour, scrapping the edges to include any of the browned pork bits in the pan. Stir continually with a wire whisk until the flour has thickened and started to brown, about 3 minutes. Pour in maple syrup and 1/2 cup of milk, continually whisking. After about 30 seconds, gravy should start to thicken again. Add remaining 1/2 cup of milk and whisk until combined. Remove gravy from heat and serve drizzled on top of pork medallions.

Dark Chocolate & Peppermint Pretzel Crisps Brownie Trifle

Ingredients:
1 box fudge brownie mix
1 - 4 ounce bag Dark Chocolate & Peppermint Pretzel Crisps
3 cups whole milk
2 packages (3.9 oz.) chocolate instant pudding
1 tub (11 oz.) whipped topping, divided
Crushed peppWhen entertaining during the holiday season, time is of the essence. Between cleaning, shopping, decorating and mingling with friends and family, there's hardly enough time to cook let alone prepare an elaborate seven course meal.
However, the lack of time doesn't mean your food or your guests have to suffer. By combining classic dishes with unique ingredients, you can enhance the flavor of your recipes without having to spend the entire evening in the kitchen.
Instead of preparing an over-the-top feast, try opting for simple and satisfying fare with a subtle modern twist to wow your guests.
Often, it's just that extra ingredient that can really tie together your favorite appetizers, entrees and desserts.
Jessica Segarra, of The Novice Chef food blog, offers three simple tips to create stand out dishes using her favorite better-for-you pretzel crackers to rethink your holiday recipes.
• While it's easy to get caught up in the moment, don't let the holidays sidetrack your guests from eating healthy.
Instead, make wholesome, lighter options the life of the party by adding unexpected ingredients to otherwise bland dishes.
Serve protein packed, homemade sweet potato hummus with veggies and flat-baked Pretzel Crisps(R), the perfect combination of sweet and savory flavors for fall and winter entertaining. Not only will the hummus keep your guests satisfied, it can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator until ready to serve.
• Sweet-and-savory never fails. Look for recipes that combine both elements to add a well-balance boost of flavor. This holds true for both desserts and entrees.
"Pretzels are my go-to ingredient for adding crunch and just the right amount of salty goodness to my sweeter dishes," says Segarra. "I've found Pretzel Crisps offer the most versatility when it comes to flavor and use. "They can be easily paired with my favorite holiday desserts, including beautifully layered trifles."
• Select dishes that can be prepared ahead of time. Entertaining is no fun if you're confined to the kitchen while your meal cooks. Choosing a baked entree like pork medallions or chicken breasts that can be prepped before your guests arrive can help to free you up to socialize.
Swap out bread crumbs for thin pretzel crackers and coat prior to your guests arrival.
Holiday gatherings are supposed to be fun for everyone, including the hosts. By adopting some simple time-saving secrets to make your food shine, both you and your food can be the life of the party.
Celebrate the holidays with Pretzel Crisps and these seasonally inspired recipes at your next gathering.

Everything Pretzel Crisps Crusted Pork Medallions with Sweet Maple Gravy

Makes 4 servings
Ingredients:
1 pound pork loin, sliced into 1 1/2-inch rounds
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 large eggs, whisked
3 cups Everything Pretzel Crisps, crushed
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
For the gravy:
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons maple syrup
1 cup whole milk

Directions:
Preheat oven to 425 F. Line a baking dish with foil and spray with non-stick spray. Set aside. Place flour in a shallow bowl. Place eggs in a separate shallow bowl. Spread crushed Pretzel Crisps on a rimmed plate. Working with one pork medallion at a time, coat pork in flour, dip into eggs and then press into pretzels. Repeat process until all pork medallions have been coated. Melt butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add four to five pork medallions at a time, cooking until lightly browned, about 2 minutes on each side. Transfer browned pork medallions to prepared baking dish. Repeat process until all pork medallions have been browned. Place pork medallions in the oven and bake until cooked through, or until internal temperature reaches 140 F, about 8 minutes. Let chops rest for 5 minutes after baking. While pork is in the oven, melt butter over medium-high heat in the skillet used to cook the pork. Whisk in flour, scrapping the edges to include any of the browned pork bits in the pan. Stir continually with a wire whisk until the flour has thickened and started to brown, about 3 minutes. Pour in maple syrup and 1/2 cup of milk, continually whisking. After about 30 seconds, gravy should start to thicken again. Add remaining 1/2 cup of milk and whisk until combined. Remove gravy from heat and serve drizzled on top of pork medallions.

Dark Chocolate & Peppermint Pretzel Crisps Brownie Trifle

Ingredients:
1 box fudge brownie mix
1 - 4 ounce bag Dark Chocolate & Peppermint Pretzel Crisps
3 cups whole milk
2 packages (3.9 oz.) chocolate instant pudding
1 tub (11 oz.) whipped topping, divided
Crushed peppermint, for garnish

Directions:
Heat oven to 350 F (325 F for dark or nonstick pan). Grease pan with butter or nonstick spray. In a medium bowl, mix brownies as directed for fudge brownies, using water, oil and eggs. Bake as directed. Cool completely, about 1 hour. Once brownies are cooled, cut into 1-inch cubes and set aside. Then in a medium bowl, beat milk and pudding mixes with whisk for 2 minutes, or until thickened. Stir in 1 cup whipped topping. Place 1/2 of brownie cubes in 2-qt. bowl. Top with a layer of Dark Chocolate & Peppermint Pretzel Crisps, followed by half of the pudding mixture and another layer of whipped topping. Repeat all layers. Sprinkle the top with crushed peppermint and one whole Pretzel Crisps. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
ermint, for garnish

Directions:
Heat oven to 350 F (325 F for dark or nonstick pan). Grease pan with butter or nonstick spray. In a medium bowl, mix brownies as directed for fudge brownies, using water, oil and eggs. Bake as directed. Cool completely, about 1 hour. Once brownies are cooled, cut into 1-inch cubes and set aside. Then in a medium bowl, beat milk and pudding mixes with whisk for 2 minutes, or until thickened. Stir in 1 cup whipped topping. Place 1/2 of brownie cubes in 2-qt. bowl. Top with a layer of Dark Chocolate & Peppermint Pretzel Crisps, followed by half of the pudding mixture and another layer of whipped topping. Repeat all layers. Sprinkle the top with crushed peppermint and one whole Pretzel Crisps. Refrigerate until ready to serve.


blog comments powered by Disqus