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Free TIme, SandPaper | Movies

CINEMANIA: Diaz, Segel star in illogical and slapstick ‘Sex Tape’

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Written by Joe Bell Friday, July 25, 2014 01:32 pm

Cameron Diaz and Jason Segel are a married couple whose sex life has gone stale. In a spur-of-the-moment decision, the two decide to make a sex tape. Of course, it accidentally gets in the hands of friends and family, so the pair end up on a nightlong chase through the L.A. suburbs, attempting to track down and delete every last copy.

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Cinemania: Apes, humans find they are not so different in ‘Dawn‘

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Written by Joe Bell Thursday, July 17, 2014 02:41 pm

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is an intense and action-packed sci-fi thriller with brilliant effects and surprisingly real emotional resonance.

The film takes place decades after its predecessor. The simian flu is now widespread. Colonies of apes with genetically advanced brainpower are thriving in the woods, and mankind is on the brink of extinction.

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Cinemania: Melissa McCarthy wears thin in ‘Tammy’

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Written by Joe Bell Friday, July 11, 2014 01:43 pm

Melissa McCarthy's schtick is beginning to run thin. She is a talented comedic presence – sharp, and good at physical comedy. But the actress who made such big waves in the 2011 smash hit “Bridesmaids” hasn't been able to get away from what is essentially the same persona.

Once again, McCarthy plays a screwed-up loudmouth prone to anger. Here, she's a fast food worker ditched by her husband. When she loses her job, she forms an unlikely alliance with her free-spirited grandma (Susan Sarandon). The two travel to Niagara Falls for a reason that is barely explained.

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CINEMANIA: Spectacular effects drive ‘Transformers: Age of Extinction’

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Written by Joe Bell Thursday, July 03, 2014 03:26 pm

The fourth movie in the “Transformers” franchise reboots the series, with new human characters taking over for Shia LeBeouf and his crew of robot-loving misfits. Mark Wahlberg stars as an eccentric, down-on-his-luck inventor and single dad who discovers that his beat-up old truck is actually Optimus Prime, the leader of the Autobots.

Since they saved the world for the third time, the few remaining Transformers are being hunted down by an evil government agent (Kelsey Grammer) and reassembled for nefarious purposes. With the help of Wahlberg and his daughter (Nicola Perez), Optimus must reassemble his crew and take on this new threat to humanity.

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Cinemania: 'Think Like a Man Too' gets lost in Vegas

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Written by Joe Bell Friday, June 27, 2014 03:59 pm

The ensemble cast of last year’s surprising smash hit “Think Like a Man” returns in this sequel, which has the characters venturing to the Las Vegas strip to celebrate the wedding of Candace (Regina Hall) and Michael (Terrence J).

The night before the big event, the men and women split up for their respective bachelor-bachelorette parties, and run through a series of clichéd relationship issues with no story or direction to speak of.

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Cinemania: Fresh, funny '22 Jump Street’ improves upon the first

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Written by Joe Bell Friday, June 20, 2014 02:15 pm

In an era of self-referential comedy, “22 Jump Street” may be one of the most meta movies ever made. It's a sequel about the frivolous nature of sequels.

Part of the fun of the first “Jump Street” was how it occasionally pointed out that Hollywood is out of ideas and willing to adapt almost any property, regardless of its popularity or worth. Here, that tone overtakes the entire film. It pushes up against the fourth wall at every opportunity. Somehow the filmmakers found a way to make a movie that, though technically a generic retread of the first film, is still fresh and diverting.

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Cinemania: Cruise is sharper than ever in explosive, original ‘Edge of Tomorrow’

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Written by Joe Bell Friday, June 13, 2014 03:45 pm

Imagine if Bill Murray's character from “Groundhog Day” was forced to battle an alien invasion, and you get a good idea of what “Edge of Tomorrow” has in store. But while the basic premise is instantly recognizable, the movie takes the idea and runs in its own direction. It's an action-packed and darkly funny film that also proves that Tom Cruise has still got it.

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Cinemania: ‘A Million Ways to Die’ more likely to kill viewers with boredom than laughter

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Written by Joe Bell Friday, June 06, 2014 01:05 pm

Neil Patrick Harris, Seth MacFarlane and Charlize Theron star in ‘A Million Ways to Die in the West.’ Neil Patrick Harris, Seth MacFarlane and Charlize Theron star in ‘A Million Ways to Die in the West.’ Seth MacFarlane, best known for creating and starring in the hit animated show “Family Guy,” made his directing debut in 2012 with the film “Ted,” in which he voiced a foul-mouthed teddy bear alongside star Mark Wahlberg.

In those projects, MacFarlane’s joke-a-minute pace and sophomoric sense of humor generally work, especially combined with his penchant for pop culture, extended cutaway gags, and his overall commitment to a bit. Because “Ted” was a smash hit, he had free reign to create whatever he wanted in his follow-up.

And he chose to make “A Million Ways to Die in the West.”

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