Outdoors

Here come the striped bass

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Thursday, October 09, 2014 09:48 am

Joseph Simmerman of Wildwood with a 30-inch striper from the fishing pier on mullet at the bottom of the outgoing tide. Joseph Simmerman of Wildwood with a 30-inch striper from the fishing pier on mullet at the bottom of the outgoing tide. The crisp fall air made its arrival last weekend. Mornings are brisk and the afternoon sun helps moderate the temperatures. Weather like this reminds us that striper season is upon us. Bridges and sod banks are quickly becoming a meeting place for anglers of all ages in search for a striper at least 28 inches.  

Debbie Mooers of Grassy Sound Marina in North Wildwood reported that the stripers are ruling the back bay right now along with the bluefish. Even a few speckled trout were caught. Mooers said the bottom of the tide has been producing the most stripers being caught from their fishing pier.

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The Evening Stars of October - Summer Triangle and Cassiopeia

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, September 25, 2014 03:31 pm

The Evening Stars of October - Summer Triangle and Cassiopeia The Evening Stars of October - Summer Triangle and Cassiopeia

Autumn nights can be cool and crisp, and the stars can be seen glittering like jewels. 

In the evening sky, the stars of late summer are still lingering overhead as night falls, such as the Summer Triangle. 

The constellations associated with autumn are clearly seen overhead after midnight, including the Great Square of the constellation Pegasus. 

In the early hours after midnight, night owls like me can see the dazzling winter constellations rising up in the east, including mighty Orion and his friends. 

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Flounder finished Saturday, but lots of fish in the sea

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Thursday, September 25, 2014 11:30 am

Katie Ryan from Pennsylvania with a nice bluefish caught aboard Tide Runner in the back bay and released.

Katie Ryan from Pennsylvania with a nice bluefish caught aboard Tide Runner in the back bay and released. By the time this column is published anglers are trying to squeeze in their final day of flounder fishing. The season officially closes on Saturday, Sept. 27 at midnight. Overall, it was a great fluke season with a decent amount of keepers being caught all this week. Nonetheless, a variety of species are biting at the lines whether they are the little blues chasing peanut bunker, croakers, tautog, and now the stripers will begin to move in.

Tom Christ of Brennan Marine in Somers Point reported that the flounder have been picked up all week at the reefs. He also said there are loads of little blue fish in the back bays of Somers Point.

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Inshore anglers are cleaning up on flounder

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Tuesday, August 19, 2014 04:05 pm

Dennis Defino and his son Braden of Broomall, Pa., caught a 3.75-pound triggerfish aboard the Royal Flush out of Wildwood. Dennis Defino and his son Braden of Broomall, Pa., caught a 3.75-pound triggerfish aboard the Royal Flush out of Wildwood. Striped bass, mahi mahi and tuna bite remain strong

Big fish for big money was the name of the game at the 23rd annual Mid-Atlantic $500,000 tournament, which was held all week from the Canyon Club in Cape May. The tournament wrapped up Friday, Aug. 22, and as of press time results were unavailable. Last year’s tournament paid out $1,808,910, and this year more than $2.3 million is expected to be awarded to some of the 125 boats entered in the contest. For results and payouts see www.midatlantic500000.com .

In the midst of the tournament, fishing inshore and offshore has been successful for many anglers. Tom Christ of Brennan Marine in Somers Point said inshore anglers are cleaning up with flounder at the reefs. 

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Anglers land some unusual catches

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Friday, August 08, 2014 03:57 am

 Allyson May Vessels, 7, of Wildwood landed her first mahi mahi, and it tipped the scales at 23 pounds. She was trolling the 5 Fathom Bank area with her dad, Gerald, on their boat Ms. Mc K&A III. Allyson May Vessels, 7, of Wildwood landed her first mahi mahi, and it tipped the scales at 23 pounds. She was trolling the 5 Fathom Bank area with her dad, Gerald, on their boat Ms. Mc K&A III.  Many weekend anglers will be anxious to get back out on the water after last weekend’s washout. During the week there were some unusual catches.

On First Fish Adventures out of Sea Isle City. Capt. Paul “Zig” Black hosted Ryan Long and his son Gabriel, 6, of Middle Township when they caught and released a houndfish out front. Two weeks ago Black took out Dan Finocchiaro and Justin McCaffrey and landed a 57-inch barracuda two miles out in front of Sea Isle City. And sheepsheads are popping up around Avalon – some pretty big ones at that.

Tom Christ of Brennan Marine in Somers Point reported that fishing continues to be good, with the majority of the action taking place offshore.

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Fishing, edition of July 18

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Tuesday, July 15, 2014 10:46 am


Emily and John Heisler of Cape May Court House show off a 5-pound, 12-ounce fluke caught near the North Wildwood bridge. It was 26 inches long.
Emily and John Heisler of Cape May Court House show off a 5-pound, 12-ounce fluke caught near the North Wildwood bridge. It was 26 inches long.  

As flounder continue to find their way out front, tautog season reopened Thursday with a one-fish minimum. Many anglers have been catching the spiny fish as well as sea bass, weakfish, porgies and bluefish.

Tom Christ of Brennan Marine in Somers Point reported that fishing last week was good again as inshore and offshore remained active.

Midweek, George Erskine fished Ships Channel and bagged a 6.14-pound flattie. He was using Gulps. He and his companion Tom Shepp had a couple of other keepers but ended up with 36 throwbacks. Bob Heins and a group on his boat K’s Krew fished the area behind Somers Point and had five nice fluke, the largest of which was 5.25 pounds. He too, was using Gulps.

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Thousands awarded in Duke of Fluke Tournament

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Monday, July 14, 2014 10:58 am

Jim Dickinson takes first place in the Sterling Harbor Duke of Fluke kayak division with a 4.45-pound flounder caught on his Hobie Pro Angler 14. Jim Dickinson takes first place in the Sterling Harbor Duke of Fluke kayak division with a 4.45-pound flounder caught on his Hobie Pro Angler 14.  Cathy Algard of Sterling Harbor Bait and Tackle in Shawcrest and her husband, George, have hosted the Duke of Fluke Tournament for the past 21 years. There were 116 boats and 39 kayaks registered this year. Thousands of dollars were awarded for top weighing fish.

 Duke of Fluke Tournament winners

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MidAtlantic offers big bucks for big fish

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, July 10, 2014 12:00 am

The 23rd annual MidAtlantic $500,000 Fishing Tournament will take place Aug. 17-22, and organizers have made some changes in response to feedback from previous years.

The tournament, held out of Canyon Club Resort Marina in Cape May and Sunset Marina in Ocean City, Md., offers new opportunities for winning a share of a cash purse that is expected to exceed $2 million, according to organizers.

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How to survive a rip current (Video)

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Written by Joan Kostiuk Tuesday, July 01, 2014 11:35 am

Aerial view of several rip currents provided by National Weather Service, courtesy of Dr. Wendy Carey, Delaware Sea Grant. Aerial view of several rip currents provided by National Weather Service, courtesy of Dr. Wendy Carey, Delaware Sea Grant. Heading to the beach? Here are some safety tips to help you avoid being caught in a rip current, and advice on what to do if you are

Each summer seems to bring with it a number of drowning deaths along the shores of New Jersey and the East Coast. Many of those deaths are the result of bathers getting caught in
rip currents.

Nearly everyone who has put their feet in the ocean has felt the pull of the tide. But what, exactly, is a rip current, and why are they so dangerous?

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Nature Camp gets kids to ‘put down the i-Thing’ and head outside

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, June 26, 2014 06:11 pm

Nature Camp gets kids to ‘put down the i-Thing’ and head outside Nature Camp gets kids to ‘put down the i-Thing’ and head outside

School has been dismissed, and the fun has already begun at the Nature Center of Cape May.

From bats to bees and bugs to birds, with a few sharks thrown in, the Nature Center has something for everyone from kids to teens.

The programs are age appropriate and include the Discovery Kids camp for children from prekindergarten to those entering sixth grade, Explore the Shore for children 6 and up, and Adventure Camps for ages 12-16, which gives older kids a chance to try kayaking, fishing offshore or exploring the natural world in and around Cape May.

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