An Afternoon of Belly Dancing

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Lorenda Knisel of Egg Harbor Township performs with The Daughters of Terpsichore.

The Daughters of Terpsichore performed a belly dancing routine on the Village Greene at Historic Smithville Saturday afternoon, Sept. 22. Originating in the Middle East, belly dancing was often used for the religious purpose of serving the gods, and Terpsichore is the name of the goddess of dance. Belly dancing did not gain attention in the U.S. until the late 1800s in Chicago. If interested in classes, the group's Facebook page is www.facebook.com/DaughtersofTerpsichore.  The Daughters of Terpsichore perform a belly dancing routine on the Village Greene at Historic Smithville Saturday afternoon. From left are co-choreographers Jen Berenato and Terri DeRozario and Lorenda Knisel, all of Egg Harbor Township, and founder-choreographer Victoria Papale, of the Villas section of Lower Township.

Jen Berenato of Egg Harbor Township takes center stage in a belly dance routine.

After their performance, the Daughters of Terpsichore teach volunteers how to belly dance. From left are Jen Berenato and Terri DeRozario, both of Egg Harbor Township, volunteer Whitney Ullman, a Galloway council member; group founder-choreographer Victoria Papale of the Villas section of Lower Township and Lorenda Knisel of Egg Harbor Township.

Lorenda Knisel of Egg Harbor Township performs.

Max Pruitt, 10, his sister Lauren, 4, their mother Kristina, of Mays Landing, and Susan West, of Absecon, clap for the Daughters of Terpsichore after they performed with belly dancing volunteers.

Jessie Dibono, of Brigantine tries out new belly dancing moves as she learns from the Daughters of Terpsichore.

Katie Sterling, of Galloway learns how to belly dance.

Amelia Ditmire, 3, of Egg Harbor Township shows off her newly learned belly dancing technique.


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