Galloway man charged with filing false Superstorm Sandy damage claim

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A Galloway man was charged Monday, April 7 with filing a fraudulent application for federal relief funds in connection with Superstorm Sandy, according to acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman./submitted A Galloway man was charged Monday, April 7 with filing a fraudulent application for federal relief funds in connection with Superstorm Sandy, according to acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman./submitted TRENTON – A Galloway man was charged Monday, April 7 with filing a fraudulent application for federal relief funds in connection with Superstorm Sandy, according to acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman.

Carl A. Meyer, 53, was charged with third-degree attempted theft by deception and fourth-degree unsworn falsification, Hoffman said.

In applying for relief, Meyer claimed that a storm-damaged house on South Adams Avenue in Margate was his primary residence, but authorities said the property was a rental building that Meyer did not live in.

To qualify for FEMA relief, applicants must affirm that the damaged property was their primary residence at the time of the storm.

Meyer applied for FEMA funds as well as a HUD Resettlement Grant. The FEMA action was denied because the damage was covered by flood insurance. The HUD grant was approved, but the alleged fraud was discovered before he was paid.

“Those who lie to defraud these relief programs are stealing funds from the victims who were hit hardest by Sandy – those left homeless because their primary homes were destroyed or seriously damaged,” Hoffman said. “We’ll continue to guard these limited funds by charging every cheat who attempts to divert funds from their rightful recipients.”

Within the past month, the Attorney General’s Office has charged six homeowners with engaging in such fraud.

“We are not done filing these cases,” said Elie Honig, director of the Division of Criminal Justice. “We want everyone out there who has engaged in this fraud to know that we are on their trail and will not rest until we’ve recovered all of the funds that were fraudulently obtained.”

Third-degree charges carry a sentence of three to five years in state prison and a fine of up to $15,000, while fourth-degree charges carry a sentence of up to 18 months in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.


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