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We are spending our children’s future

To the editor:

Most Americans live very busy lives, but some of us occasionally pause to think about what is happening to our country. Many folks are deeply concerned about our economy and the future, while too many others close their eyes to the problems that will surely impact them, sooner or later. One of the most obvious problems, government overspending, has a long history, but over the past four years, the national debt has spiraled out of control, receiving only lip service from our national leadership. Anyone with a basic knowledge of economics and a modicum of common sense should realize that the path we are on is unsustainable.

We love to blame the politicians, and they are deserving scapegoats. But the real fault is ours, the American people. Through the Constitution, our founding fathers placed “We the People” in charge, and over the years we’ve failed to live up to that responsibility.  Instead of seeking people of good character to lead us, we’ve voted for too many unprincipled scoundrels with no respect for our Constitution. To get elected, they’ve promised all things to all people until there’s nothing left to back up their promises. I suspect things will get much worse, which might be fitting if only we adults were affected. But how is this fair to our children and grandchildren? They are not the ones who failed to honor the American promise, but they certainly will be the ones who suffer the consequences.

The burden of debt we are placing on our children becomes more crushing by the day, as we continue sacrificing their future through egregious overspending on programs that only serve to destroy the fabric of America. Government programs that provide goods and services, at no cost, for able-bodied, capable individuals serve only to foster a dependency on government that has gradually eroded that wonderful sense of self-reliance that not so long ago was shared by the vast majority of Americans and communities across the land.   

Thirty years ago, I believed my children would have as good a life as my own, or better.  Today, I look at my granddaughter and wonder if she will ever realize the full promise of America. I can only hope so, and do my part to make that happen.

Larry Pacentrilli

Ventnor


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