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the kitchen diva: Irreplaceable pumpkin

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Written by ANGELA SHELF MEDEARIS and GINA HARLOW Thursday, October 09, 2014 11:30 am

the kitchen diva: Irreplaceable pumpkin the kitchen diva: Irreplaceable pumpkin

It's that time of the year when certain foods take the stage in a grand fashion. Fall ushers in a long season of iconic ingredients and homey, familiar dishes. Much has been said and written about and created with pumpkin. Maybe it's because this famous gourd is the very color of the changing landscape. It makes you wonder: Is there anything new under the brilliant orange skin of the pumpkin?

When it comes to our taste buds, fads seem to come and go. One minute we are gushing and gorging on a new sensation, and the next we're discarding it like an old pair of leg warmers. But pumpkins are like diamonds; they will forever be loved and treasured. Maybe it's because we don't feast on them all year long, so when their season returns, they bring to the table that wonderful combination of something new, yet remembered.

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Here come the striped bass

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Thursday, October 09, 2014 09:48 am

Joseph Simmerman of Wildwood with a 30-inch striper from the fishing pier on mullet at the bottom of the outgoing tide. Joseph Simmerman of Wildwood with a 30-inch striper from the fishing pier on mullet at the bottom of the outgoing tide. The crisp fall air made its arrival last weekend. Mornings are brisk and the afternoon sun helps moderate the temperatures. Weather like this reminds us that striper season is upon us. Bridges and sod banks are quickly becoming a meeting place for anglers of all ages in search for a striper at least 28 inches.  

Debbie Mooers of Grassy Sound Marina in North Wildwood reported that the stripers are ruling the back bay right now along with the bluefish. Even a few speckled trout were caught. Mooers said the bottom of the tide has been producing the most stripers being caught from their fishing pier.

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One Kook’s Safari: Fun, fun, fun on the autumn waves

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Written by Bill Barlow Saturday, October 04, 2014 08:01 am

Scenes from last year’s Spooks and Kooks event. This year it’s on the 1st Street Beach in Ocean City Saturday, Oct. 11.  It promises to be huge, epic fun. (photos by Joe Almo III) Scenes from last year’s Spooks and Kooks event. This year it’s on the 1st Street Beach in Ocean City Saturday, Oct. 11. It promises to be huge, epic fun. (photos by Joe Almo III) Last week, Rory Parker created a bit of a stir with his “5 unpleasant truths about surfing that everyone needs to hear,” posted on The Inertia. You can read it here

He declares surfers smug and self-satisfied, “always looking for one more reason to delude ourselves into thinking we’re somehow special and unique,” although I think he deserves some props for not excluding himself.  

He goes into a bit of detail on each “unpleasant truth,” but they range from the practical (don’t buy retail) to the esoteric (surfing won’t save your soul). He also disses longboards.

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Filmmakers take on waves, and the scourge of hipster-ism

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Written by Bill Barlow Saturday, September 27, 2014 09:30 am

Andrew Gesler gets airborne. (Image courtesy Dark Fall Productions) Andrew Gesler gets airborne. (Image courtesy Dark Fall Productions) Can a hipster be cured?

Andrew Gesler of Ocean City and Margate’s Alex DePhillipo have weighed in on the question with a new film, which premiered this summer, and the prognosis isn’t good.

It’s called “Death 2 Hipsters,” and it’s a surf movie comedy.

Being cool, and the attended marketing of whatever coolness is, seems to be taking over surfing, said Gesler in a recent interview. Major fashion companies are reaching into surf culture.

The folks who put together the local surf movie “Dark Fall” wanted to try something new, a surf satire.

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The Evening Stars of October - Summer Triangle and Cassiopeia

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, September 25, 2014 03:31 pm

The Evening Stars of October - Summer Triangle and Cassiopeia The Evening Stars of October - Summer Triangle and Cassiopeia

Autumn nights can be cool and crisp, and the stars can be seen glittering like jewels. 

In the evening sky, the stars of late summer are still lingering overhead as night falls, such as the Summer Triangle. 

The constellations associated with autumn are clearly seen overhead after midnight, including the Great Square of the constellation Pegasus. 

In the early hours after midnight, night owls like me can see the dazzling winter constellations rising up in the east, including mighty Orion and his friends. 

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Flounder finished Saturday, but lots of fish in the sea

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Thursday, September 25, 2014 11:30 am

Katie Ryan from Pennsylvania with a nice bluefish caught aboard Tide Runner in the back bay and released.

Katie Ryan from Pennsylvania with a nice bluefish caught aboard Tide Runner in the back bay and released. By the time this column is published anglers are trying to squeeze in their final day of flounder fishing. The season officially closes on Saturday, Sept. 27 at midnight. Overall, it was a great fluke season with a decent amount of keepers being caught all this week. Nonetheless, a variety of species are biting at the lines whether they are the little blues chasing peanut bunker, croakers, tautog, and now the stripers will begin to move in.

Tom Christ of Brennan Marine in Somers Point reported that the flounder have been picked up all week at the reefs. He also said there are loads of little blue fish in the back bays of Somers Point.

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Local artists paint a picture of Upper Township’s past

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, September 25, 2014 11:00 am

Beesleys Point Hotel, painted by Felica Stephenson	Beesleys Point Hotel, painted by Felica Stephenson The Historical Preservation Society of Upper Township introduced its “History Through Arts” project at its monthly meeting on Sept. 9. The project was sponsored by Cape Bank and the response to the program was excellent with a standing room crowd.

The society sought a way to highlight the township’s history through paintings of various local historical buildings, places, people and events. Artists throughout the township were solicited and selected to capture the essence of these historic elements. The artists, through their visions and interpretations, produced amazingly beautiful works of art.

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Beach reads: September 26, 2014

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Written by Marjorie Preston Thursday, September 25, 2014 10:23 am

For All Time For All Time

For All Time

by Jude Devereaux, Ballantine Books

Graydon Montgomery is used to women fawning over him. The moneyed heir to the throne of a small European nation, he is devastatingly handsome – just like his identical twin brother, Rory. Graydon is still eligible – just barely, as his future bride has already been chosen for him. Yet he can’t help being intrigued by winsome Toby Wyndham, a bridesmaid at his cousin’s wedding on Nantucket Island. Among her charms, Toby doesn’t give Graydon the time of day, and she is the only person who can easily tell Graydon from his twin (in royal lore, this means their love is fated). When circumstances demand that the prince stay on the island for a week, he asks Toby to be his guide, and soon realizes he will have to defy destiny – and forces from the past – to win the woman he loves. It’s a little complicated, and readers who know the “Nantucket Brides” series won’t need a compass to navigate the plotlines, past and present. All in all, this is a fairy tale Deveraux fans will love.

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the kitchen diva: Mastering the school lunch

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Written by ANGELA SHELF MEDEARIS and GINA HARLOW Thursday, September 25, 2014 10:13 am

School is back in session School is back in session

School is back in session – and so is your daily lunch-making routine. A good lunch is a balanced one, formed around a dependable main course and punctuated with a solid supporting cast of nutrient-packed sides, a low- or no-calorie drink and even a little treat.Don't worry if your child wants basically the same lunch every day. Just include these nutritious choices that we call the four elements to a perfectly packed lunch. Here are some tips that will keep your child's school mealtimes healthy and happy all year long.Food safetyKeep food preparation areas in the kitchen clean. Wash countertops, cutting boards, utensils and your hands in hot, soapy water. And don't let the family pet jump up on kitchen counters. After preparing lunches, remember to immediately return unused portions of perishable foods -- like cheese, mayonnaise and deli meats – to the refrigerator. Don't let them sit out on the counter. Make sure cold foods are cold before packing them in a lunchbox. If possible, prepare the lunch the night before and store it in the refrigerator. (This also takes the edge off the mad morning rush.) Insulated lunch bags or boxes are the best way to keep food at a safe temperature until noon. Sandwiches made with refrigerated items such as luncheon meats, cheese and tuna salad should be carried in an insulated lunch bag with an ice pack or frozen juice pouch inside so sandwiches will stay extra cool. At school, instruct the kids to store their lunchbox out of direct sunlight and away from radiators or other heaters, if possible. Keep hot food – like soup, stew or chili – hot. In the morning, bring the food to a boil and then immediately pour into a hot, sterile vacuum bottle. (Sterilize the vacuum bottle with boiling water before using.) Lunch foods that can be eaten at room temperature include peanut butter, jam, jelly, bread, crackers, cereals, clean fruit and vegetables, dried meat such as beef jerky, baked products such as cookies and cake, and canned meat and poultry products that are eaten immediately after opening Make healthy choicesIn a nutshell, meat should be lean (no salami or bologna), bread should be whole-wheat, and condiments should be used sparingly. Here are some ideas:- A turkey or roast beef and Swiss sandwich on wheat bread with a drizzle of low-fat Italian dressing (instead of mayo) and loaded with produce, if you can get away with it.

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Surfers turn out for Edouard

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Written by Bill Barlow Saturday, September 20, 2014 07:37 am

There were a few nice shaped waves this week, like this one on Thursday morning. The ride didn’t last long, though, before the wave closed. There were a few nice shaped waves this week, like this one on Thursday morning. The ride didn’t last long, though, before the wave closed. They came, and kept coming.

They came in minivans, beat up station wagons and sedans. They came with boards stuffed in the back of SUVs from Lexus and Mercedes, in Econolines and in pickups with more rust than paint.

They came in search of waves, lured by the promise of Hurricane Edouard, heading up the coast this week.

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One Kook’s Safari: Another hurricane due to head up the coast, with big waves expected

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Written by Bill Barlow Tuesday, September 16, 2014 11:44 am

We won’t know what Hurricane Edouard will bring, but it’s expected to pass well off the coast this week. Previous storms this year brought some great waves, but this one’s being described as the first major storm of the season. We won’t know what Hurricane Edouard will bring, but it’s expected to pass well off the coast this week. Previous storms this year brought some great waves, but this one’s being described as the first major storm of the season. Summer’s not over, but if it were a tube of toothpaste, we’d be folding it from the bottom by now.

There’s good news, though: the water’s still warm, and the forecast calls for big waves from Hurricane Edouard this week. Expect the swell to build overnight into Wednesday, with head-high waves rolling in Wednesday and Thursday morning.  Expect a strong current and be ready for some heavy surf. The forecast keeps changing, so take a good look before paddling out.  

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Maddie Peterson set to make waves on the world stage

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Written by Bill Barlow Saturday, September 06, 2014 06:25 am

Maddie Peterson of Wildwood Crest hopes to be on surfing’s world tour in a couple of years. She’s gaining a name in surfing competitions, and is in training for an upcoming event in Belmar. (photo submitted) Maddie Peterson of Wildwood Crest hopes to be on surfing’s world tour in a couple of years. She’s gaining a name in surfing competitions, and is in training for an upcoming event in Belmar. (photo submitted) On one of the surf forums, in the lead-up to one of this summer’s hurricane swells, a commenter posted something suggesting surfers shouldn’t worry too much if they miss the big day.

So far, so good. As this summer showed, more waves are always on the way.

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Beach Reads: September 5, 2014

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Written by Marjorie Preston Wednesday, September 03, 2014 02:47 pm

Ragtime Cowboys Ragtime Cowboys

Ragtime Cowboys

By Loren D. Estleman, Forge

In the grand tradition of Western writer Louis L’Amour, Estleman spins this entertaining yarn about two former Pinkerton detectives in shabby, crime-ridden “Hollywoodland” circa 1921. Real-life gumshoes Charles D. Siringo (known as the “cowboy detective”) and a tubercular Dashiell Hammett (who has yet to make his name as a writer) are on the trail of a ranch hand who stole a horse from Wyatt Earp. The men soon sense there are dirtier doings afoot, involving Charmian London, widow of “The Call of the Wild” author Jack London; a sinister card sharp named Clanahan and his murderous henchman, “the Eel”; and rum-runner Joseph P. Kennedy, who even then is boasting he will someday see his son in the White House. Packed with wry, crackling dialogue and references to the famous and infamous of the period (Butch Cassidy, Judge Roy Bean, Fatty Arbuckle, Will Rogers), “Ragtime Cowboys” is an easy ride in a well-broke saddle. And it’s tons of fun.

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Cinemania: 'A Dame to Kill For' is a stunning but brutal follow-up to 'Sin City'

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Written by Joe Bell Thursday, August 28, 2014 05:37 pm

It took director Robert Rodriguez almost a decade to revisit Sin City, and this film retains the same dark, stylized tone as the original pulpy noir. While it doesn't deliver as powerful a punch as the first film – which also happened to be one of the most faithful comic-book adaptations of all time – “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” is still an entertaining follow-up. It’s visually stunning, brutally violent, and expertly explores its dark, seedy undertones.

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The Shorter Days of August, September

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, August 28, 2014 05:00 pm

By now, we've all noticed that our summer days are growing shorter.  The longest day is over a month past and we can look forward to our daylight growing shorter until the shortest day in December. 

While we all notice the lengthening and shortening of the days, a lot of people don't noticed that the change in daylight is not smooth and even. 

Actually, the length of daylight doesn't change very much for about a month on either side of the longest day. 

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