SandPaper | SummerGazette.com

Happy Days Cafe opens in Ocean City

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 25, 2012 09:10 am

Managers Angelo Cuculino and Kate Basenfelder at the Happy Days Café Managers Angelo Cuculino and Kate Basenfelder at the Happy Days Café  

OC’s ode to the ’50s opens this weekend

A 20-something employee of Happy Days Café said she didn’t think “the younger generation” would appreciate the memorabilia in the ’50s-themed eatery, opening this week at 10th Street and Asbury Avenue in Ocean City.

In reply, manager Angelo Cucolino asked her, “Do you know who Elvis is? Have you ever heard of Marilyn Monroe?”

Of course she said yes, said Cucolina, proving that some things never go out of style.

Read more: Happy Days Cafe opens in Ocean City

   

Don’t be ‘that guy’ holding up the line at the boat ramp

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 25, 2012 06:38 am

REG-boat-ramp

Memorial Day is here. It’s a time to slow down and remember every soldier that has made a sacrifice, suffered death or a life-changing injury so that goobers like me could run around covering bass tournaments and filming fishing shows. Two simple words: Thank you.

But look, I’m convinced that if I ever stop filming fishing shows, I could show up on any boat ramp in America on Memorial Day weekend and film a bestselling blooper tape of people struggling on boat ramps.

Read more: Don’t be ‘that guy’ holding up the line at the boat ramp

   

Service with a Smile - May 25, 2012

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 25, 2012 06:07 am

Service-Boathouse

Mark Kinsey, Olivia Tirello, Rich Fullerton and Sue Jones of the Boathouse Restaurant in Wildwood.

Read more: Service with a Smile - May 25, 2012

   

Beach Reads > May 25, 2012

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Marjorie Preston Thursday, May 24, 2012 04:33 pm

  Books-jackie-after-o  

Jackie After O. By Tina Cassidy, It Books. On Nov. 22, 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy witnessed the assassination of her husband, President John F. Kennedy, in a Dallas motorcade. Five years later the young widow, enshrined in the public imagination as an almost mythically tragic figure, shocked Americans by marrying a toad-like billionaire named Aristotle Onassis and becoming a very public member of the jet set. Five years after that, when Onassis died, “Jackie O” reminded the world that she was more than the widow of a U.S. president, the widow of a Greek billionaire, and a preferred target of the paparazzi. One of the world’s wealthiest and most recognized women, Onassis took a job as a consulting editor at a New York publishing house. The pay was a mere $10,000 per year – which Onassis could have spent in a single day of clothes shopping. Tina Cassidy tells the story of Jackie’s first year on the job, when she faced the wrath of colleagues who thought she didn’t deserve the job, and worked in earnest to gain their trust and earn her keep. This charming and disarming chronicle will give you a glimpse of Onassis as a protective, sometimes frustrated mother of two teens; a seasoned celebrity who knew how to navigate the fishbowl of fame; a cautious lover; and an ambitious, intelligent woman who wanted to do more than star in tabloid headlines.

Read more: Beach Reads > May 25, 2012

   

One Kook's Safari > Shed the neoprene and shred

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Thursday, May 24, 2012 04:24 pm

A surfer catches a nice wave off Ocean City. A surfer catches a nice wave off Ocean City.  

Once summer starts and the gloves come off, surfers shift from cold avoidance to crowd avoidance  

I’ve been feeling it. Have you? That spring fever – the hood’s off and the gloves are off and the water feels fine, so you can’t wait to lose the rest of the neoprene armor that has been keeping you cozy. You dream about paddling out with just a bathing suit and a smile.

It seems so much easier not having to wrestle into a wetsuit – being able to just paddle, and removing hypothermia from the surfing equation entirely.

Then Memorial Day is around the corner, and with it warm water and open businesses, and oh yeah, crowds.

Read more: One Kook's Safari > Shed the neoprene and shred

   

Above-normal water temp brings fluke action

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Thursday, May 24, 2012 04:11 pm

Chloe and Charlotte Selover and Brynn and Chloe Breakell caught, kissed and released this striper off the Cape May beach last weekend. (May 19-20) Chloe and Charlotte Selover and Brynn and Chloe Breakell caught, kissed and released this striper off the Cape May beach last weekend. (May 19-20)  After a rocky start of the week, the nicer weather is beginning to settle in, providing anglers with what looks to be a memorable Memorial Day weekend. Cooperative conditions plus the unofficial start of the summer equals lots of boat traffic as well as a lot of fish to be caught.

The water temperature is about 10 degrees above average for this time of the year. This has resulted in a lot of fluke action and the early arrival of many weakfish up and down the coast, and plenty of blue claw crabs are being caught.

Tom Christ of Brennan Marine Supply in Somers Point reported that flounder fishing was really good last week. Chris Daggett, on the vessel Leanne, caught several flatties in the bay behind Somers Point, with one measuring 27 inches. Mike Wolfe fished the same area and caught four of his own, with the largest coming in at 23 inches.

Read more: Above-normal water temp brings fluke action

   

Sweet! In praise of our honeybees

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Sunday, May 13, 2012 01:36 pm

By Sandy Stuart Perry
Communications Manager
New Jersey Conservation Foundation

This past winter was the mildest in recorded history. While this was a plus for many – no plowing, no shoveling! – it wasn’t good for our honeybee colonies.

Instead of staying snug in their hives, expending little energy and consuming little food, the confused honeybees buzzed out into the warm weather, searching for pollen and nectar. Not finding much, they returned to their hives hungry and quickly depleted the stores of honey they needed to survive. Beekeeper Shaun Ananko, who teaches beekeeping courses for the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New Jersey and Grow It Green Morristown, says some colonies actually starved.

Read more: Sweet! In praise of our honeybees

   

One Kook's Safari > The ocean is deeper than our emotions

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Friday, May 11, 2012 01:43 pm

Sometimes everything closes out around you. Sometimes a good surfer gets a ride anyway. Sometimes everything closes out around you. Sometimes a good surfer gets a ride anyway.

The ocean is not kind.

Nor cruel.

Waves and water are untouched by such human constructs. They can gently embrace a child, crush a battleship, or demolish a city with caprice that seems to us like mood swings.

We sometimes speak of waves as friendly, but there is no love for you in a wave. No anger, either.

It sure seems like it sometimes, doesn’t it?

I don’t so much mean when the ocean seems angry. It’s such a natural metaphor, looking out over a churning ocean reflecting a storm-gray sky. Saying “The angry waves fiercely tossed the fishing boat” gets a feeling across, even if we all know that nothing so petty as emotion was involved at all. Those waves and currents would have followed the same rules of physics whether there was a fishing boat there or not.

Read more: One Kook's Safari > The ocean is deeper than our emotions

   

Cinemania > ‘Avengers’ filled with heart, humor, spectacle

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 11, 2012 01:18 pm

MoviesAvengers

From a patchwork of superhero franchises, Joss Whedon assembles one big blockbuster

As a sequel to “Thor,” “Captain America,” and the two “Iron Man” films, “The Avengers” is truly an event movie. Throwing all these franchises together must have been difficult, and it could easily have been screwed up. Thankfully, director Joss Whedon pulls it off, and the risk pays in a big way.

It opens with Samuel L. Jackson's Nick Fury, head of the secret military organization S.H.I.E.L.D., testing an alien energy source called the Tesseract when the headquarters is invaded destroyed by a vengeful Loki, Thor's brother. His goal is to take over the Earth, with the help of the Tesseract and an intergalactic army under his control.

Read more: Cinemania > ‘Avengers’ filled with heart, humor, spectacle

   

Ocean Galleries to feature Brian Davis florals

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, May 11, 2012 12:56 pm

“Purple Irises” by Brian Davis “Purple Irises” by Brian Davis

Ocean Galleries will kick off the summer Memorial Day weekend with guest artist Brian Davis, who will be in Stone Harbor with a collection of his lifelike floral paintings.

The exhibition, “Flowers of Light,” runs Friday through Monday, May 25-28 at Ocean Galleries, 9618 Third Avenue, Stone Harbor, with the artist scheduled to appear at receptions 7-10 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Davis’ primary subjects are florals. He transforms roses, calla lilies and dahlias into romantic, compelling images with sharpness, color, movement, edge, and light. His work hangs in the Los Angeles Museum of Art, Huntington Library Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, Calif., and the Laguna Beach and Long Beach museums of art, and his fans include Quincy Jones, Barbra Streisand, Cher, Henry Winkler and the Ford family, according to a press release.

A native Californian, Davis began experimenting with photography at a young age.  Formally educated in Fine Art at Pierce College and California State University (Los Angeles), Davis was influenced by the Dutch masters, along with the artists of the art nouveau and art deco eras.

Read more: Ocean Galleries to feature Brian Davis florals

   

Beach Reads > edition of May 11, 2012

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Marjorie Preston Friday, May 11, 2012 12:40 pm

book-Everybreath

Every Step You Take. By Jock Soto. Harper. Ballet dancer-turned-chef Jock Soto grew up the gay son of a macho Hispanic father and artistic Navajo mother. In his teens, the self-described “half-breed” fled the Arizona desert for New York, where his talent propelled him to the top at George Balanchine’s New York City Ballet. Soto’s rise was swift but not simple; a natural dancer but unsophisticated and naïve, he used dance “as an emergency-escape from the messy turmoil” of his insecurities, faced occasional rejection and jealousy from his peers, fell in and out of love, struggled to reconnect with his family, and ultimately became the principal dancer for the NYCB under Peter Martins. Interspersed among the tales of disappointment and triumph are encounters with the greats – “Mr. B,” Jerome Robbins, Darci Kistler, Jacques D’Amboise and others. Soto also includes some favorite recipes: spicy guacamole, penne Polonaise, and Grandma Rachel’s Navajo fry bread among others. A rewarding memoir, and memorable depiction of the artist as a young man.

Read more: Beach Reads > edition of May 11, 2012

   

Anglers reel in the keepers on opening day for flounder

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Monday, May 07, 2012 04:04 pm

Dustin Laricks fished with captain Joe Hughes last Saturday and caught himself a dozen bluefish and one striper behind Sea Isle City.  Dustin Laricks fished with captain Joe Hughes last Saturday and caught himself a dozen bluefish and one striper behind Sea Isle City.

Cloudy skies, showers and chilly temperatures couldn't keep anglers from casting their lines last Saturday for the opening day of flounder season. A drive over just about any bridge last weekend gave a view of the waters flooded with boats throughout the back bays. Those trying to catch their first keeper flattie of the year complained of the cold weather but where thrilled with the start of the season.

Read more: Anglers reel in the keepers on opening day for flounder

   

Wildwoods named no. 1 family boardwalk

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Monday, May 07, 2012 12:00 pm

The Wildwoods boardwalk was named the number one beach boardwalk for families in the nation by familyvacationcritic.com.

The website called the Wildwoods boardwalk "one of the most popular and kitschiest boardwalks in the country." The website noted the Wildwoods’ nostalgic doo-wop architecture and the honky-tonk atmosphere along its five-mile-long free beach, and said the two-mile stretch of boardwalk has everything families could want – from funnel cake to arcade games – and enough rides to rival Disneyland.

Read more: Wildwoods named no. 1 family boardwalk

   

Lessons taken from the (surf) board of education

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Bill Barlow Friday, April 20, 2012 01:42 pm

Sean Nader gets a few nice rides in Ocean City this week. Conditions improved Thursday morning, when your devoted columnist was writing this. Sean Nader gets a few nice rides in Ocean City this week. Conditions improved Thursday morning, when your devoted columnist was writing this.

There’s something about surfing that lends itself to metaphor.

Sure, football and baseball figures of speech are woven into the fabric of contemporary American English, so much so that when someone speaks of striking out, fumbling or being blindsided it hardly registers as having roots in sports at all.

But surf metaphors fit well when talking about life.

I don’t mean throwing around often-misused jargon like “gnarly” or “hang 10,” although describing someone as stoked is rarely out of place. I’m talking about the way the process of waiting for a wave, never knowing for certain exactly what you’re in for, and when one eventually comes to you either finding joy in a brief ride or wiping out, well, seems like a kind of microcosm of our lives.

Oof. Even typing that out, I can hear the sitars and the southern California accent creeping in. “Dude! It’s like the wave is the universe, and we’re all riding it. But then what’s the beach?”

Read more: Lessons taken from the (surf) board of education

   

Cinemania > edition of April 20, 2012

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Written by Staff Reports Friday, April 20, 2012 04:11 am

Cabin

‘The Cabin in the Woods’ blends horror, hilarity

In many ways, “The Cabin in the Woods” is typical horror-movie fare. It’s also a film that likes to screw with your preconceived notions.
That dichotomy makes this a difficult review to write. While there’s no huge twist to reveal, or any intricate plot elements, the less you know going in, the better. Expect a traditional horror film, and you’ll have your expectations delightfully dashed within the first 10 minutes.

Here’s the ‘A’ plot: a group of young sexy teenagers stay in a mysterious cabin for the weekend, only to get picked off one by one. It’s pretty by-the-book, but the typical horror scenes are swiftly and sharply undercut by the hilarious ‘B‘ plot, about an exterior force that’s causing all the mayhem. By the third act, when the two stories finally merge, it’s a gleefully fun moment.

The screenwriters have fun playing with conventions and subverting expectations in the film, which is filled with solid belly laughs and some genuinely horrifying moments.

Read more: Cinemania > edition of April 20, 2012

   

Page 20 of 24