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One Kook's Safari > Is saying ‘obsessive surfer’ redundant?

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Written by Bill Barlow Friday, July 06, 2012 03:23 pm

One Kook's Safari > Is saying ‘obsessive surfer’ redundant?

It has become a pattern.

If anyone were to ask, I’d strongly advise against trying to get a surfing session in on July 4. If you absolutely needed to squeeze in a couple of rides, then I’d say, paddle in about 6 a.m., or at the very least before the guards hit the beach in the morning.

Especially if it’s hot like this year, there are way too many obstacles on a summer holiday, and surfing takes a lot of room. In the unguarded areas where you can surf, you are trying to keep track of swimmers, kayakers, boogie boards, possibly a catamaran or two, and the occasional rocketing lure from a surf fisherman before you even try to catch a wave.

Some spots are guarded surf beaches, including some that are for surfing only. I would highly recommend those, especially for beginners, but there are only so many waves to go around. There are fewer kinds of obstacles, but it’s still pretty crowded.

It’s not a hard and fast rule, but chances are, if someone is paddling out in the middle of a packed beach holiday, they have not been doing this long. A bunch of the most dedicated longboarders in Ocean City used to take a long kayak trip in the open ocean every Independence Day, because there was no point in trying to hit the waves.

Still, every year, there I am, bobbing out past the break, trying to find a clear line and keep track of where the kids are.

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Crest lifeguard is engineering a nuclear future

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Written by Brian Cunniff Friday, July 06, 2012 09:39 am

Brian Cunniff
 Scott Wandel is a third-year guard who watches over the beach at Sweetbriar Road in Wildwood Crest.
Brian Cunniff Scott Wandel is a third-year guard who watches over the beach at Sweetbriar Road in Wildwood Crest.

Scott Wandel is currently providing safety for beachgoers at the Jersey Shore. In the near future, he hopes to be providing safe, efficient ways for people to get to the beach.

The third-year lifeguard with the Wildwood Crest Beach Patrol recently graduated from Penn State University with a degree in mechanical engineering. He is nowhere near finished with his studies, however. Wandel plans to return to Penn State in the fall to begin what figures to be a five- or six-year journey toward a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering.

“I’d like to eventually be a professor and do a lot of research,” the 22-year-old resident of Carson City, Nev., said. “Until then I’d like to do a lot of scientific work at a lab. We have a big energy dilemma, and nuclear energy is key. It’s the next hot topic. Is it the energy of the future? Maybe. But something has to be done about (utilizing) renewable energy. I think nuclear is a step in the right direction.”

It’s not often residents of Nevada find their way east both to attend college and work in the summer. Wandel, however, spent much of his youth in York, Pa., and was a regular shore-goer thanks to his father, Tom, who was a lifeguard in Wildwood Crest for a few years in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

“My family’s always been coming here in the summers,” Wandel said.

His father has a high-profile job with Starbucks, which is why the family has been on the move a bit. They are about to make another move to Seattle.

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Book takes readers on a treasure hunt through Cape May County

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Written by Staff Reports Saturday, June 30, 2012 12:00 am

“The Oceanfront Treasure Hunt” chronicles a young pirate’s treasure hunt past familiar seaside sights. “The Oceanfront Treasure Hunt” chronicles a young pirate’s treasure hunt past familiar seaside sights.

A new children’s book written about Cape May County could be just the thing to pique kids’ interest in reading and treasure hunting this summer.

Written by Denise Blum, “The Oceanfront Treasure Hunt” is about a young pirate who receives a treasure map as a birthday gift. She sets out on an exciting journey, following the map to claim her treasure. Her quest takes her to many of the seaside’s popular destinations, such as Morey’s Piers, Johnson’s Popcorn, the Deauville Inn, the Victorian homes of Cape May, the beach and other locations.

Published by Mainstay Publishing, the book is full of colorful illustrations by Brandon Hildreth. For information contact Mainstay at 302-223-6636 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

The book can be purchased at various locations, many of which are stops along the treasure hunt.

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Service with a Smile in OC- Jun. 29, 2012

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Written by Staff Reports Friday, June 29, 2012 01:22 pm

OC-Service-Blue-Dolfin-0629

Stefan Zareba, Maddie Howell and Ernest Phillips of Blue Dolfin Bakery in Marmora.

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Beach Reads > June 29, 2012

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Written by Marjorie Preston Friday, June 29, 2012 09:40 am

  My Extraordinary Ordinary Life Beach Reads  

My Extraordinary Ordinary Life by Sissy Spacek, Hyperion. She’s a star but without the mega-wattage or tabloid appeal of, say, Angelina Jolie, and in her new biography Sissy Spacek comes across as homespun, friendly, family-centered and utterly charming. The book details her tomboy girlhood in the small town of Quitman, Texas, to her adventurous early years in New York and L.A. as she tracks her unlikely rise to stardom (she had to fight for the role of Carrie, and showed up at the audition in a sailor dress handmade by her mother). Spacek initially resisted playing country singer Loretta Lynn in “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” the role that won her an Oscar. She changed her mind after meeting Lynn, and asking for and getting a “sign” that convinced her to take the role. Spacek shares the childhood loss that shaped her life, the happiness she found in marriage and family, and her wry, knowing perspective on Hollywood. An easy read with no shattering revelations – and that’s a relief.

 

 

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One Kook's Safari > Locals take first and second at kite surf contest

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Written by Bill Barlow Friday, June 29, 2012 12:30 am

Teddy Lyons after demonstrating kiteboarding at International Surfing Day recently. Teddy Lyons after demonstrating kiteboarding at International Surfing Day recently.

Teddy Lyons Jr. gets a lot of time in the water.

“The beauty of it is, it’s never a matter of ‘Should I go kiting or surfing.’ If the wind’s offshore and there’s a wave, let’s surf,” he said. If the wind picks up from the south, chopping up the waves, it’s time to go kiteboarding, he said. Lyons almost always has a way to move on the water.

“Except for today,” he said from the beach in the south end of Ocean City, where he was hanging with Mark Miedama. Things were fairly flat.

Lyons is 19, Miedama 20, and they have both grown up soggy. Miedama started surfing at 4, he said, and has been kiting for about eight years.

“I’ve been in the water my whole life,” Miedama said.

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Copepods are a tiny ally in mosquito fight

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Written by Alex Davis Thursday, June 28, 2012 03:13 pm

Bob Kent, administrator of the DEP Office of Mosquito Control Coordination, pours a bucket of copepods into one of the pools near the Cape May County Department of Mosquito Control.

Bob Kent, administrator of the DEP Office of Mosquito Control Coordination, pours a bucket of copepods into one of the pools near the Cape May County Department of Mosquito Control.

 Surrounded by reeds, state agriculture Secretary Douglas Fisher picks up three white buckets and dumps thousands of tiny shrimp-like crustaceans into a pool of water near the Middle Township Performing Arts Center on Friday.

The copepods feed on mosquito larvae.

“What a learning experience for all us,” Fisher said.

The land is part of Middle Township High School, and according to state officials, pesticides cannot be used on school property to fight mosquitoes.

Peter Bosak, superintendent of the Cape May County Department of Mosquito Control, said that using copepods is another option for fighting the flying bloodsuckers.

Copepods live in ocean and freshwater habitats and are about 1 to 2 millimeters long. Shaped like a teardrop, they have long antennae and an exoskeleton that is so thin it is largely transparent.

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Offshore action is off the charts

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Written by Heather Holtzapfel James Thursday, June 28, 2012 03:01 pm

Grace Thompson, fishing with her dad, John, aboard the Brynnie-B charter with captain Frank Breakell last weekend, caught a big dogfish. Here, she kisses it before release. Grace Thompson, fishing with her dad, John, aboard the Brynnie-B charter with captain Frank Breakell last weekend, caught a big dogfish. Here, she kisses it before release.

What a difference a week can make when it comes to fishing. Last weekend there were reports of a lull in the flounder fishing. This past week, the action turned back on and there are even reports of some of the best offshore fishing in 25 years. All thanks to warmer weather and lighter winds.

Joan Barrett of Dolfin Dock in Somers Point had some notable catches to report. Gene Dobley of Somers Point landed a 4.22-pound flounder on minnow out of Ships Channel. Also catching fish from Ships Channel were Bob Bloom of Egg Harbor Township with a 7.96-pounder and Bill Wilson of Somers Point with a 3.84-pound fish. Jack Sweeder of Ocean City caught a 4.73-pound fluke on green Gulp from Kennedy Park in Somers Point, and George Stapelton of Somers Point picked up a 4.5-pounder while using Gulp from the Great Egg Inlet.

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Cinemania > Pixar’s ‘Brave’ is beautiful, inspiring

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Written by Marjorie Preston Thursday, June 28, 2012 01:58 pm

Mpvies-Brave  Brave

The latest from Pixar turns the conventional Disney-style princess into an independent, forceful character capable of her own decisions and responsible for her own future.

Princess Merida, voiced by Kelly MacDonald, has been raised all her life to become queen. Though she struggles to maintain a prim and proper attitude, she’d much rather be galloping through the Scottish moors on her faithful steed, slinging arrows and seeking adventure.

When three suitors vie in a contest to win her hand, Merida enters the competition herself, defying tradition and her parents and sending the kingdom to the brink of turmoil. She soon realizes her wish has consequences, and she must fight to undo what she has done.

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This organic farm is really growing

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Written by Marjorie Preston Thursday, June 28, 2012 11:32 am

Farmer Jaime Alvarez discusses the benefits of organic farming and free-range livestock. The animals at Beach Plum Farm are regularly released to roam throughout the property.
Farmer Jaime Alvarez discusses the benefits of organic farming and free-range livestock. The animals at Beach Plum Farm are regularly released to roam throughout the property.

Beach Plum Farm supplies local restaurants, with some to spare

 WEST CAPE MAY – Organic farmer Jaime Alvarez would rather grow an ugly tomato that tastes like heaven than a photogenic fruit that tastes like wax.

This summer – his second year running Cape Resorts’ Beach Plum Farm – Alvarez will grow about 11,000 pounds of less-than-lovely tomatoes, along with a bumper crop of strawberries, blueberries and blackberries. He has planted rows of asparagus, broccoli, kale, carrots and other vegetables, plus fields of corn, acres of herbs, and of course, the signature beach plums, a hardy flowering shrub prized for its sweet, plum-like fruit.

Most of this bounty is destined for Cape Resorts’ group of restaurants, including the Ebbitt Room, Blue Pig, and Rusty Nail in Cape May, and Chelsea Prime and Teplitzky’s in Atlantic City. The rest will be available at a produce market open to the public starting this month.

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Ris Gallery features work of Jane Hartley, Julia Sutliff

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, June 28, 2012 11:21 am

by Jane Hartley by Jane Hartley

This weekend marks the opening of two exhibits at the William Ris Gallery in Stone Harbor. The shows open Saturday, June 30 and will remain through July.

The first exhibit is “Knot Play” by artist Jane Hartley.

Hartley combines a background in graphic design and her appreciation of the old masters in her traditional-style figurative and still-life paintings. She has studied art both locally and abroad.

A graduate of The Maryland Institute College of Art, she pursued a career in graphic design and went on to create artwork for interior designers and private collections. Her fascination with the old masters led her to an apprenticeship where she studied the traditional formulas and techniques that are a part of her painting style.

Hartley's art is largely influenced by 17th and 18th century artists. Working mostly in oils, she also uses pastel for some of her figurative and portrait subjects.

Hartley, who lives just outside St. Michael’s, Md., has been displaying her artwork for 30 years.

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Morey’s opens 2 new water attractions

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Written by Christie Rotondo Friday, June 22, 2012 01:44 pm

Racers speed down WipeOut, the new six-lane water slide at Morey’s Piers’ Ocean Oasis. Racers speed down WipeOut, the new six-lane water slide at Morey’s Piers’ Ocean Oasis.

Morey’s Piers has opened two new water attractions this summer.

The lazy river at Raging Waters has been renovated, and a six-lane racer slide has been added to Ocean Oasis.

“We’re in the entertainment business and we need to deliver freshness in our parks,” Jack Morey, executive vice president of Morey’s Piers said. “So we thought it best to make over the water parks.”

Adventure River is the new name given to the revamped 1,000-foot lazy river, which now has a frontier look to it. There are fallen trees, rocks, grottos, geysers and benches all along the river. Morey said larger decorations around the river are based on “wreckers” – ships that had washed up onto the Jersey shore that the locals would turn into homes.

“We designed it so it looks as if people are living and working there,” Morey said.

As part of the new theme, Morey said the “back of the house” – the river’s filtration pipes – are now on display. He said these pipes became part of the attraction to solve a problem with spacing in the park.

“We took a challenge and turned it into an opportunity to display something in a whimsical but truthful way,” Morey said.

The pipes are identified with kid-friendly labels, for example the backwash line reads “Icky yucky water on the way to the MUA,” Morey said.

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One Kook's Safari > Surfing Day seeks to share the stoke

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Written by Bill Barlow Friday, June 22, 2012 12:15 pm

Numerous future surfers have a chance to try out a board at International Surfing Day Wednesday, June 20 at the 59th Street beach in Ocean City. Numerous future surfers have a chance to try out a board at International Surfing Day Wednesday, June 20 at the 59th Street beach in Ocean City.  The Surfrider Foundation works on numerous projects: cleaning beaches, advocating for the environment, working to protect the waves where surfers play.

But Wednesday’s event was pretty much just a beach party.

John Bonino of Marmora helped pull the annual International Surfing Day together at the 59th Street beach in Ocean City.

“It’s really just having a good time on the beach,” said Tom Hoops of Ventnor, another one of the organizers with Surfrider.

Throughout the world, International Surfing Day includes beach cleanups and paddle-outs, but Bonino said the Ocean City event was aimed at introducing people to the joy of the beach and the surfing lifestyle.

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6-year guard aspires to be a vet

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Written by Brian Cunniff Friday, June 22, 2012 11:56 am

Matt Marquis Matt Marquis

Matt Marquis has been coming to the Jersey Shore from his hometown of Swedesboro in Gloucester County for as long as he can remember. In fact, members of his family have been coming here for close to 75 summers, as the family vacation home at Eighth and Central avenues in North Wildwood has been passed down through the generations.

For the sixth summer since he has been 16 years old, Marquis is here at the shore for the entire summer as a member of the North Wildwood Beach Patrol. He regularly patrols the beach at Eighth Avenue, protecting many of the beachgoers and family members he interacted with as a youngster while going to the same beach.

But even though the 22-year-old recent Rutgers University graduate has always had an affinity for the beach, he also has a background in a much different lifestyle, after earning an undergraduate degree in animal science.

While at Rutgers, Marquis worked on a farm with different types of livestock. He also has experience on an uncle’s farm in Bucks County, Pa.

“Mainly I think it’s from my mom pushing me to be a veterinarian,” Marquis said with a laugh, explaining how he became interested in animal science. “But I love working with animals. It’s fun and different.”

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To bead or not to bead isn’t the question – it’s what to bead next

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Written by Christie Rotondo Thursday, June 21, 2012 06:59 pm

Diana Cutshall, who made this seed bead necklace, will be demonstrating beading techniques in front of the West End Garage in Cape May Saturday, June 30. Diana Cutshall, who made this seed bead necklace, will be demonstrating beading techniques in front of the West End Garage in Cape May Saturday, June 30.

 When rainy skies hit the Jersey Shore, beachgoers turn to crafts and indoor activities to pass the time. One craft – beading and jewelry-making – is becoming an intricate art for some rather than just a hobby.

“Handmade jewelry is becoming an art,” said Jessica McClanahan, who teaches a seed-beading class at Potomac Bead Company in Ocean City. “There’s craft beading and there’s art beading.”

The tiny seed beads are intricately stitched together in patterns to create jewelry and even sculptures.

Holly Parker of Ocean City, who creates and sells handmade jewelry, decided to take the spiral seed-beading class at Potomac Beads.

“Seed beading is big right now,” Parker said. “It’s just different and it looks like somebody actually made them.”

Parker said that handmade jewelry, particularly intricate pieces like those made with seed beads, is in high demand, rather than manufactured items.

Bill Baumer, owner of the Potomac Bead Company, said class times were moved to evenings to bring more people into Ocean City’s downtown, and prices were dropped to $10. The company holds two classes every evening, from beginner classes on creating a simple necklace, to learning how to spiral stitch seed beads. Frequently, the classes fill up, he said, as more people begin to catch on to the trend.

“People are learning that the hardest part is picking out your beads,” he said.

At Just Bead It in Stone Harbor, classes are also popular. Instructor Christine Norton believes it to be because of the sense of accomplishment that comes with finishing a piece of jewelry you can wear.

Read more: To bead or not to bead isn’t the question – it’s what to bead next

   

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