Storm of 1962

Demonstration reenacts Sea Isle evacuations during Storm of ’62

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Written by Staff Reports Tuesday, March 13, 2012 01:50 pm

Hundreds of spectators filled the decks of the Sea Isle City Library while a Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin Helicopter performed a rescue demonstration over the nearby wetlands. The demonstration commemorated the military evacuations that carried residents to safety during the Storm of 1962. Hundreds of spectators filled the decks of the Sea Isle City Library while a Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin Helicopter performed a rescue demonstration over the nearby wetlands. The demonstration commemorated the military evacuations that carried residents to safety during the Storm of 1962.

SEA ISLE CITY – To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the infamous Storm of 1962, the Sea Isle City Historical Society, in partnership with the Sea Isle City branch of the Cape May County Library, offered a series of special events that included panel discussions, the dedication of original artwork, temporary museum exhibits and a rescue demonstration by the United States Coast Guard.

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Putting knowledge to work to protect our coast

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Written by Stewart Farrell Friday, March 09, 2012 12:47 pm

Stewart Farrell, PhD, director the Richard Stockton Coastal Research Center in Port Republic, provided the following commentary on what the March 1962 storm means to us today as it relates to the subject of shore protection.

The lesson learned was that little perspective on what big storms could do was truly devastating when one happened. The dunes had been pushed down for a better view; the homes placed 25 feet from the high tide line. No regulations on building codes, site selection or damage avoidance.  This storm spawned the development of the National Flood Insurance Program.

 

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50 years later: Looking back at a devastating storm

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Written by Mary Linehan Friday, March 09, 2012 10:22 am

See storm.shorenewstoday.com for more storm coverage

CAPE MAY – The good bones of this centuries old resort were rattled by the Great Atlantic Storm of 1962, but left intact.

"It was the only nor'easter that the weather bureau has named," said Harry Bellangy of the Greater Cape May Historical Society. "The storm sat here for three days and beat on the city through five high tides, one after another, with the winds from the northeast keeping the water in the bays. The water just kept coming up and up and up.

Read more: 50 years later: Looking back at a devastating storm

 

Brigantine reminisces about Great Atlantic Storm of 1962

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Written by MICHAEL FEELY Thursday, March 08, 2012 03:41 pm

While it has been 50 years since Brigantine suffered the March 1962 storm, residents who were on the island at the time have clear and distinct memories of the devastation.

Former Councilwoman Sue Schilling was in the eighth grade at Central School, where the library is now, and lived at 200 13th Street South.

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Brigantine after the great storm of 1962

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, March 08, 2012 03:37 pm

This beachfront home in Brigantine looks as if waves crashed through, knocking out the foundation and collapsing the house. This beachfront home in Brigantine looks as if waves crashed through, knocking out the foundation and collapsing the house.

Photos Submitted by Judith Holst Hall

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The Great Atlantic Storm of 1962

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Written by Michael Feely Thursday, March 08, 2012 03:00 pm

Fifty years later there are a few on the island who remember the March 1962 storm that ravaged the East Coast and in particular – Brigantine. At that time, the island had a population of approximately of 1,200 residents. An unusual storm – it was not one of our nor' easters or a hurricane – but a convergence of factors that resulted in one of the most fierce ocean storms of historical record. It struck with unbelievable fury as it destroyed residences along the beachfront.

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Boyer Museum looks back at the big storm

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, March 08, 2012 12:33 pm

Photos courtesy of the Boyer Museum

John Roat, vice president of the Wildwood Historical Society, looks through the George Boyer Museum’s collection of storm photos.  John Roat, vice president of the Wildwood Historical Society, looks through the George Boyer Museum’s collection of storm photos.

Waders and boats were necessary equipment for getting around the Wildwoods during the flooding that came with the March 1962 storm.  Waders and boats were necessary equipment for getting around the Wildwoods during the flooding that came with the March 1962 storm.

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Storm of ’62 was a valuable lesson in shore protection

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Written by JAMES FITZPATRICK Thursday, March 08, 2012 11:44 am

PORT REPUBLIC – If the Great Atlantic Storm of 1962 were to put in a repeat performance in 2012, experts say the resulting damage would likely be far less severe because of the work being done on the frontlines of shore protection.

Daniel Barone, left, chief of geospacial analysis at the Coastal Research Center, and B. Steven Howard, geospatial analyst, are two scientists working on the frontlines of shore protection. Daniel Barone, left, chief of geospacial analysis at the Coastal Research Center, and B. Steven Howard, geospatial analyst, are two scientists working on the frontlines of shore protection.

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Absecon man saw his family livelihood washed away

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Written by STEVE PRISAMENT Thursday, March 08, 2012 11:29 am

ABSECON – At one time Paxsonville was a mainstay of this city – a tourist court with 62 cabins and a restaurant on the White Horse Pike west of the Delilah Road overpass.

Stormwater rises in front of the restaurant at Paxsonville; it was to get a foot or so higher. Stormwater rises in front of the restaurant at Paxsonville; it was to get a foot or so higher.

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Mainland areas suffered high wind, flooding damage

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Written by R.J. LIBERATORE Jr. Thursday, March 08, 2012 11:20 am

EGG HARBOR CITY – Local historian Majorie Garwood remembers how her father, George Gries, rode her around as he looked for news in the communities surrounding Egg Harbor City in the early 1960s.

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’62 storm was harrowing for Brigantine bride-to-be

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Written by MARJORIE PRESTON Thursday, March 08, 2012 11:16 am

BRIGANTINE – Thirteenth Street is the last street on the northernmost tip of the island, only a block long between beach and bayfront. When the storm of ’62 hit, the bay and the ocean met on the narrow thoroughfare, according to Brigantine native Verna Cherry, who now lives in Galloway.

Verna Cherry of Galloway shares photos of the 1962 nor’easter with her grandchildren, Juliet Cherry, 5, and Joey Hawn, 16, a student at Absegami High School Verna Cherry of Galloway shares photos of the 1962 nor’easter with her grandchildren, Juliet Cherry, 5, and Joey Hawn, 16, a student at Absegami High School

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Crest resident films storm's destruction

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, March 08, 2012 11:04 am

Tom Benner shot 8mm video during the March 1962 storm in Wildwood Crest. After the storm passed, he traveled through the borough and filmed the destruction of landmarks like the Crest fishing pier, the life guard station houses along Sunset Lake and motels along the beach. Benner also shows the destruction of homes in Cape May and West Wildwood.

   

Tales of the Tides: Savarese

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Written by SUBMISSION Thursday, March 08, 2012 10:56 am

I moved to the United States in January of ’61 to Brooklyn from Sorrento, Italy. I was 21 at the time, and I took the bus down to Atlantic City in October of ’61. The storm happened in March.

Sal Savarese Sr. sits in his restaurant, Tulipano in Galloway, holding a picture from the ’62 storm Sal Savarese Sr. sits in his restaurant, Tulipano in Galloway, holding a picture from the ’62 storm

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Tales of the Tides: Fadigan

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Written by SUBMISSION Thursday, March 08, 2012 10:40 am

I was 24 at the time of the storm, living in Atlantic City with my husband and daughter. We lived at the corner of Atlantic and Maine avenues in a big white apartment building in a middle section. My husband was a commercial fisherman. He was the captain, and he was supposed to go out the night before. The weather was fine at the time. Maybe it was a gut feeling or maybe he was just tired, but he said he was going to wait and go out in the morning. Thank God that he didn’t go out, because he would have been a goner.

There was debris everywhere, and so much had been destroyed. There was debris everywhere, and so much had been destroyed.

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Tales of the Tides: Turner

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Written by SUBMISSION Thursday, March 08, 2012 10:31 am

I was 20 at the time of the storm and living in Pleasantville. I was a newlywed with my husband, George. We were married in January, and the storm was in March. We were living in Glendale Manor Apartments.

Steel Pier’s entrance way was washed out by the storm Steel Pier’s entrance way was washed out by the storm

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Tales from Ocean City: Dick Keyser

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Written by Ann Richardson Thursday, March 08, 2012 12:00 am

Dick Keyser was happy-go-lucky guy in 1962 with a motorcycle, a girlfriend and an apartment at 10th Street and Wesley Avenue.

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Tales from Ocean City: Carla Migliaccio

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Written by Ann Richardson Thursday, March 08, 2012 12:00 am

The Migliaccio family lived in harm’s way when the water started rising on March 6, 1962 on Pleasure Avenue. They were across the street from the bay and what was then Chris’ and Hogate’s restaurants, at the foot of the Ninth Street bridge.

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Tales from Ocean City: Jeff Monihan

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Written by Ann Richardson Thursday, March 08, 2012 12:00 am

The Monihan family – Bob, his wife Joy and their sons Michael and Jeff lived on Arkansas Avenue. Bob Monihan owned Monihan Realty, with an office at 32nd Street and Central Avenue.

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Tales from Ocean City: Bill Moreland

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Written by Ann Richardson Thursday, March 08, 2012 12:00 am

The Moreland family drove down from Abington, Pa. to check on their home at 3721 Asbury Ave., a few days after the storm subsided.

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Donna Cramer remembers the storm in Margate

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Written by Submitted Thursday, March 08, 2012 12:00 am

Hackney’s had waves wash out the bottom of the restaurant.
My sister, Debbie Smith, and I grew up in Margate on the 300 block of Argyle Avenue, between the ocean and the bay. Our maiden name was Levy.

I was 6 at the time and my sister was 9. We vividly remember waking up that day, and the ocean and the bay actually met. My sister remembers that when they met, it formed a big wave. The water luckily only came up to the second step of our porch.

Read more: Donna Cramer remembers the storm in Margate

   

Tales of the Tides: Jeanne Holbrook

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Written by Submission Wednesday, March 07, 2012 08:03 pm

I lived in Ventnor Heights and remember the ’62 storm very well. I was 14 years old and lived with my parents, Harry and Virginia Bickel, grandparents and brother on North Suffolk Avenue in the house my father built. He was born and raised in Ventnor, so when he built his house, he built it higher than most other people did.

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Tales of the Tides: Wendy Cohn

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Written by Submission Wednesday, March 07, 2012 08:02 pm

I was 5 years old and we lived on Quincy Avenue and the beach in Margate. I went to bed and it was dark and rainy. When we awoke, the ocean was coming down the block and the water was up to our front steps.

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Tales of the Tides: Betty Feyel

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Written by Submission Wednesday, March 07, 2012 08:01 pm

We tried to keep everything as normal as possible. My husband and I had friends over to play cards. They were interesting friends from the Jolly Roger – it was Johnny and Ramona Moore. The winds came up, and the lights were flicking on and off. As we were playing, we were concerned that the storm was getting really bad.

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Tales of the Tides: Skip Broomall

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Written by Submission Wednesday, March 07, 2012 08:01 pm

I was 6 years old with the measles; the curtains were pulled down in those days, so I was unable at first to look out the window. We lived in the Venice Park section of Atlantic City on Madison Avenue, two blocks from the bay. Well, not that day.

I woke up and pulled the blinds up to see the new day. I could not believe my eyes; water covered everything. Water was up to the first or second step of the entrance to our house. This meant the water level was somewhere in the 3- to 4-four foot range in the street.

Read more: Tales of the Tides: Skip Broomall

   

Riding out the storm by the Mayflower pool

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Written by Submission Wednesday, March 07, 2012 08:00 pm

I was 13, and it was my sister's 17th birthday. We did not go to school that day – I do not remember why, either the birthday or the storm. My mother was worried about flying debris because the winds were so high. We lived in an apartment on the 100 block of Tennessee Avenue in Atlantic City. My mother owned a store at Tennessee and the Boardwalk, under the Mayflower Hotel, across from Fralinger's.

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