Great Atlantic Storm of 1962 Reader Submissions

Putting knowledge to work to protect our coast

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Written by Stewart Farrell Friday, March 09, 2012 01:47 pm

Stewart Farrell, PhD, director the Richard Stockton Coastal Research Center in Port Republic, provided the following commentary on what the March 1962 storm means to us today as it relates to the subject of shore protection.

The lesson learned was that little perspective on what big storms could do was truly devastating when one happened. The dunes had been pushed down for a better view; the homes placed 25 feet from the high tide line. No regulations on building codes, site selection or damage avoidance.  This storm spawned the development of the National Flood Insurance Program.

 

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Brigantine after the great storm of 1962

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, March 08, 2012 04:37 pm

This beachfront home in Brigantine looks as if waves crashed through, knocking out the foundation and collapsing the house. This beachfront home in Brigantine looks as if waves crashed through, knocking out the foundation and collapsing the house.

Photos Submitted by Judith Holst Hall

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Boyer Museum looks back at the big storm

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Written by Staff Reports Thursday, March 08, 2012 01:33 pm

Photos courtesy of the Boyer Museum

John Roat, vice president of the Wildwood Historical Society, looks through the George Boyer Museum’s collection of storm photos.  John Roat, vice president of the Wildwood Historical Society, looks through the George Boyer Museum’s collection of storm photos.

Waders and boats were necessary equipment for getting around the Wildwoods during the flooding that came with the March 1962 storm.  Waders and boats were necessary equipment for getting around the Wildwoods during the flooding that came with the March 1962 storm.

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Tales of the Tides: Savarese

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Written by SUBMISSION Thursday, March 08, 2012 11:56 am

I moved to the United States in January of ’61 to Brooklyn from Sorrento, Italy. I was 21 at the time, and I took the bus down to Atlantic City in October of ’61. The storm happened in March.

Sal Savarese Sr. sits in his restaurant, Tulipano in Galloway, holding a picture from the ’62 storm Sal Savarese Sr. sits in his restaurant, Tulipano in Galloway, holding a picture from the ’62 storm

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Tales of the Tides: Fadigan

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Written by SUBMISSION Thursday, March 08, 2012 11:40 am

I was 24 at the time of the storm, living in Atlantic City with my husband and daughter. We lived at the corner of Atlantic and Maine avenues in a big white apartment building in a middle section. My husband was a commercial fisherman. He was the captain, and he was supposed to go out the night before. The weather was fine at the time. Maybe it was a gut feeling or maybe he was just tired, but he said he was going to wait and go out in the morning. Thank God that he didn’t go out, because he would have been a goner.

There was debris everywhere, and so much had been destroyed. There was debris everywhere, and so much had been destroyed.

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Tales of the Tides: Turner

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Written by SUBMISSION Thursday, March 08, 2012 11:31 am

I was 20 at the time of the storm and living in Pleasantville. I was a newlywed with my husband, George. We were married in January, and the storm was in March. We were living in Glendale Manor Apartments.

Steel Pier’s entrance way was washed out by the storm Steel Pier’s entrance way was washed out by the storm

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Donna Cramer remembers the storm in Margate

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Written by Submitted Thursday, March 08, 2012 01:00 am

Hackney’s had waves wash out the bottom of the restaurant.
My sister, Debbie Smith, and I grew up in Margate on the 300 block of Argyle Avenue, between the ocean and the bay. Our maiden name was Levy.

I was 6 at the time and my sister was 9. We vividly remember waking up that day, and the ocean and the bay actually met. My sister remembers that when they met, it formed a big wave. The water luckily only came up to the second step of our porch.

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Tales of the Tides: Jeanne Holbrook

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Written by Submission Wednesday, March 07, 2012 09:03 pm

I lived in Ventnor Heights and remember the ’62 storm very well. I was 14 years old and lived with my parents, Harry and Virginia Bickel, grandparents and brother on North Suffolk Avenue in the house my father built. He was born and raised in Ventnor, so when he built his house, he built it higher than most other people did.

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Tales of the Tides: Wendy Cohn

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Written by Submission Wednesday, March 07, 2012 09:02 pm

I was 5 years old and we lived on Quincy Avenue and the beach in Margate. I went to bed and it was dark and rainy. When we awoke, the ocean was coming down the block and the water was up to our front steps.

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Tales of the Tides: Betty Feyel

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Written by Submission Wednesday, March 07, 2012 09:01 pm

We tried to keep everything as normal as possible. My husband and I had friends over to play cards. They were interesting friends from the Jolly Roger – it was Johnny and Ramona Moore. The winds came up, and the lights were flicking on and off. As we were playing, we were concerned that the storm was getting really bad.

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