Tales of the Tides: Savarese

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I moved to the United States in January of ’61 to Brooklyn from Sorrento, Italy. I was 21 at the time, and I took the bus down to Atlantic City in October of ’61. The storm happened in March.

Sal Savarese Sr. sits in his restaurant, Tulipano in Galloway, holding a picture from the ’62 storm Sal Savarese Sr. sits in his restaurant, Tulipano in Galloway, holding a picture from the ’62 storm

There was sand all the way to Pacific and Atlantic avenues. I remember not being able to sleep at night because of the windows shaking from the wind. Anyone who had a basement apartment was flooded out. They couldn’t get in because there was so much water.

I worked at a bakery called Center City Italian Bakery. We couldn’t work, cook, or make bread for three or four days because there was no electricity. We had to sell stale bread, and people bought it just for something to eat.

The storm took away almost 300 beach houses from here to Cape May. There was sand all along Ocean Drive. The boardwalk and Steel Pier were really damaged. The pier broke in half.

We had to just wait for it all to get cleaned up. It took weeks and months. I had never seen a storm like that before.

Virginia Avenue in Atlantic City after the storm. Virginia Avenue in Atlantic City after the storm. The end of Steel Pier stands alone after part of the pier washed away. The end of Steel Pier stands alone after part of the pier washed away. The Atlantic City Boardwalk after the storm. The Atlantic City Boardwalk after the storm. Debris left by the storm in Atlantic City. Debris left by the storm in Atlantic City. At Maine Avenue, the storm ripped boardwalk railings from their sockets. At Maine Avenue, the storm ripped boardwalk railings from their sockets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sal Savarese Sr.

Cologne


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