100 years of girl scouting

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

Grace Brouschard with Gilda, a kitty waiting to be adopted. Grace Brouschard with Gilda, a kitty waiting to be adopted.

Every cookie has a mission: helping girls do great things.

On March 12, 1912 Juliette Gordon Low got 18 girls together to learn about community service and to enjoy being out in the open air. These girls went hiking, played sports, went camping and learned first aid. Within a few years a girl-centered organization was formed and today the Girl Scouts of America has a membership of over 3 million girls and adults. They are committed to diversity and inclusiveness to every girl, everywhere.

During the Great Depression, girl scouts led relief efforts in their communities by collecting clothing and food, making quilts and toys and providing meals. World War II found girl scouts growing Victory Gardens, collecting clothing that was shipped overseas, and scrap metal for use here. They operated courier services on their bicycles and taught women survivor skills and techniques for use during black outs.

In the 1950's the Girl Scouts began a movement to include all girls including daughters of military personnel who were always on the move, migrant workers, Native American girls and those who were physically challenged. This is a commitment that has continued to this day.

In the 1960's the Girl Scout groups were divided by age: Daisy, Brownie, Junior, Cadet and Senior Girl Scout. And over the next decades their missions developed with the times.

The contemporary issues series' first issue was entitled “Tune in to Well Being: Say No to Drugs.” Other issues dealt with literacy, youth suicide and child abuse. Project Safe Time was begun for latch key girls. A program called PAVE (Project Anti-Violence Education) received federal funding. Close to 4 million girls participated in Barbara Bush's "Right to Read" project.

The Girl Scouts responded to 9/11 by writing thank-you notes to rescuers; they hosted remembrance ceremonies and did many community service initiatives. Girl Scouts across America donated $1 each to help the children of Afghanistan.

The badges and awards that girls could earn have changed over time. Initially, the girls worked towards earning badges in Cooking, Sewing, Trail Blazer, Artist, Citizenship, Safety, First Aid, Gardening, Naturalist, Photography, Scribe and Musician. Today girls can earn awards/badges in Computer Fun, Aerospace, Inventor, Woodworking, Marketing, Environmental Health, Jeweler, Global Awareness, International Friendship, Stress Less and Adventure Sports among others.

Today they sell cookies and earn badges but there is so much more. They volunteer to improve neighborhoods by building gardens and doing trash clean-up. They do what they can to protect the planet with environmental awareness.

Our own local Troop 45127 has sent cookies to US troops in Afghanistan and to Noogieland, which is the support center at Gilda's Club for children with cancer. This year they collected donations to send cookies to Saudi Arabia where one of the girl's had a sister, Amanda Heraux, stationed in the Navy.

Troop 45127’s current mission involves helping out at Beacon Animal Rescue. The girls volunteered to walk some of the dogs in the Tuckahoe Christmas parade and the awareness resulted in several dogs being adopted. They donated some of their fundraising monies to Beacon when they heard a new kitten cage was needed. The troop has also collected needed items for the shelter (pet food, cleaning supplies, bedding) and will continue to donate their time and supplies on a regular basis.

Way to go, Girl Scout Troop 45127! Continue to wear your hearts on your sash. More information and history can be found on the Girl Scouts of America website.

Girl Scout Troop 45127 are volunteers at Beacon Animal Rescue. (Back row) Cassidy Coan, Megan Kelly, Kiley Pettit, Grace Brouschard, and Al Reese, president of Beacon with (front row) Lauren Heraux, Kayla Attiya, McKenna Fuller, Nicki Cappolina and vet tech Missy Lindholm with Patches. Girl Scout Troop 45127 are volunteers at Beacon Animal Rescue. (Back row) Cassidy Coan, Megan Kelly, Kiley Pettit, Grace Brouschard, and Al Reese, president of Beacon with (front row) Lauren Heraux, Kayla Attiya, McKenna Fuller, Nicki Cappolina and vet tech Missy Lindholm with Patches.

McKenna Fuller and Kayla Attiya look in on Roxy, a pit bull mix ready for her new home. McKenna Fuller and Kayla Attiya look in on Roxy, a pit bull mix ready for her new home.


blog comments powered by Disqus