Arctic invasion takes aim for next week

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The dreaded polar vortex, the dome of arctic air that sometimes sinks south like an unwelcomed relative, is planning to visit for a several days if not weeks, according to a National Weather Service extended forecast model. As a result, the East Coast could experience prolonged temperatures that average 10-20 degrees colder than normal for days, if not weeks, the Weather Service says. The dreaded polar vortex, the dome of arctic air that sometimes sinks south like an unwelcomed relative, is planning to visit for a several days if not weeks, according to a National Weather Service extended forecast model. As a result, the East Coast could experience prolonged temperatures that average 10-20 degrees colder than normal for days, if not weeks, the Weather Service says.

The dreaded polar vortex, the dome of arctic air that sometimes sinks south like an unwelcomed relative, is planning to visit for a several days if not weeks, according to a National Weather Service extended forecast model.

As a result, the East Coast could experience prolonged temperatures that average 10-20 degrees colder than normal for days, if not weeks, the Weather Service says.

Polar vortex: When does the cold start?

The current east-west zonal weather pattern will begin to change during this week. As a result, a dip in the jet stream will begin to form during the weekend of Jan. 18-19. As it spreads over the eastern United States, it will open the door to the arctic invasion.

Polar vortex: What does it mean?

Temperatures that had ranged from near normal to slightly above normal on Monday, Jan. 13, will be far from normal beginning on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Monday, Jan. 20.

Temperatures will plummet with the arctic invasion. The chill off starts in Minnesota and will work east and south from there, according to the National Weather Service.

Polar Vortex: How cold does it get?

If your grandparents like to tell you how cold it was when they were children, they will get a chance to relive their childhood during the next few weeks.

Temperatures in Atlanta could seem like those normally found in the Carolina mountains. Temps in D.C. will seem more like Philly. Daily temperatures in Philly will seem like those normally associated with the Poconos. And if you life in Pittsburgh, it will feel alot like Buffalo. I feel sorry for those who live in Toronto, Winnipeg or North Bay, Canada.

By the end of next week – Jan. 25-26 – temperatures across all of the eastern United States will average about 8 degrees colder than normal, the Weather Service says. While that may not sound like too much, the Polar Vortex will bring down enough of a temperature change to turn a normal rain event into a decent snowfall.

Jan. 25-26 snow storm?

Currently, the National Weather Service 15-day, long-range outlook brings a clipper system across the Middle Atlantic States on Jan. 25-26. Because temperatures will be so cold, a swath of 6-8 inches of snow is forecast along the East Coast from Delaware through New Jersey through southern New England.

Polar Vortx: How long does it last?

Because of the lack of daylight hours and the lower position of the sun in the sky, there is not enough heat during the day to bully back the arctic air. As a result, this Polar Vortex cold outbreak could stick around through the middle of February, according to some models.

Polar Vortex: The coldest time

The National Weather Service suggests the coldest portion of the outbreak could be between Jan. 28 and Feb 2 – the day of the Super Bowl.

That’s when two-thirds of the country will experience much colder than normal temperatures.

The worst of the chill will be over the Upper Midwest where temperatures could average 15-20 degrees colder than normal for several days.

Polar Vortex: When does it end?

Relief slowly builds in from the west and the south, according to the National Weather Service.

By the time Valentine’s Day rolls around, temperatures much warmer than normal will work across the prairies and reach the East Coast a few days later.

By the third week in February, for example, temperatures along big cities of Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, New York and Boston could average 5-10 degrees warmer than normal.

 

 

 


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