East Coast, South Jersey cold temperatures to last for weeks

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While Wednesday afternoon’s South Jersey temperature struggled to reach 14 degrees, a leading national weather forecaster is predicting much more of the same: High temperatures during 39 of the next 45 days will at or below normal readings in South Jersey./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com While Wednesday afternoon’s South Jersey temperature struggled to reach 14 degrees, a leading national weather forecaster is predicting much more of the same: High temperatures during 39 of the next 45 days will at or below normal readings in South Jersey./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com

While Wednesday afternoon’s South Jersey temperature struggled to reach 14 degrees, a leading national weather forecaster is predicting much more of the same: High temperatures during 39 of the next 45 days will at or below normal readings in South Jersey.

 

Prolonged cold settles in across eastern United States

 That’s the cold temperature word from AccuWeather, which publishes daily 45-day outlooks for cities across the country and the world.

 Personally, I wouldn’t use AccuWeather’s 45-day outlook to determine if I should buy an umbrella or snowshoes for a Feb. 28 hike through the woods.

 I’d rather look out the door that morning.

 However, you’ll find one thing seems to be true when you compare the trends suggested by AccuWeather along with trends posted by other long-term weather models.

 It’s going to be real cold for real long.

 Unfortunately, that’s the word.

 Cold temperatures for now

 According to NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, temperatures over much of the eastern United States have more than a 50 percent chance of being colder than normal for the next 6-10 days.

 Unfortunately, that’s the word for the next 10-14 days also.

 According to the Weather Channel, daily high temperatures during the next 10 days will average about 14 degrees colder than normal.

 A series of clipper systems will zip across the country and bring different levels of cold weather with them.

 South Jersey daily highs should be around 40 degrees in late January. Instead, South Jersey high temperatures could be below freezing for much of the next 10 days.

 Cold temperatures for February

 

Much of the eastern portion of the United States has a large chance of being colder than normal during the next 6-10 days./Climate Prediction Center Much of the eastern portion of the United States has a large chance of being colder than normal during the next 6-10 days./Climate Prediction Center But the NCEP coupled forecast system model version 2 continues to post troubling forecasts for anyone who wants to hop on a motorcycle, swing a golf club or start the spring chores.

 The CFS forecasts colder-than-normal temperatures for February. In some cases, temperatures could remain 10 degrees colder than normal for several days in a row.

 February is the month in which South Jersey high temperatures begin in the low 40s and start a slow climb up to about 48 degrees.

 However, enough cold air will remain in place to make many days in February seem like January days instead.

 Cold temperatures for March?

 But the bad news from the CFS doesn’t stop with February’s temperature outlook.

 According to the CFS model for March 3-8, temperatures will average about 10 degrees colder than normal over a large portion of the Midwest.

 Most of the eastern half of the United States will have colder temperatures than normal, the CFS says.

 Closer to home, temperatures will average about 4 degrees colder than normal over the Middle Atlantic States.

 When will it warm up?

 While it should – we hope- get progressively warmer through the next 45 days, daily high temperatures are likely to average colder than normal until the first week of March. As a whole, temperatures in March should average slightly above normal for South Jersey and the Middle Atlantic States, the CFS says.

 March is the month when temperatures climb through the 50s in South Jersey.

 

 

 

 

 


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