Update: South Jersey winter storm watch for strong coastal storm

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The National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center has issued a winter storm watch for South Jersey along with revised snow totals that could come when a strong coastal storm climbs the east coast Wednesday evening through Thursday afternoon. Areas of Delaware, Maryland and eastern Pennsylvania are included as well./NWS The National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center has issued a winter storm watch for South Jersey along with revised snow totals that could come when a strong coastal storm climbs the east coast Wednesday evening through Thursday afternoon. Areas of Delaware, Maryland and eastern Pennsylvania are included as well./NWS

The National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center has issued a winter storm watch for South Jersey along with revised snow totals that could come when a strong coastal storm climbs the east coast Wednesday evening through Thursday afternoon. Areas of Delaware, Maryland and eastern Pennsylvania are included as well.

“Heavy snow, icing due to freezing rain and coastal flooding are all threats from this storm,” said Gary Szatkowski, a meteorologist with the Mount Holly Forecast Center.

While the Wednesday evening commute should be fine for motorists, both the Thursday morning and afternoon drives will be impacted by the nor’easter, he said.

Szatkowski said the forecast calls for 8-plus inches of snow in the where the heaviest bands of precipitation set up.

Much of western Atlantic County could get between 6-8 inches of snow on Wednesday evening, according to the National Weather Service. Snow totals fall off near the coast with is expected to get 2-4 inches of snow.

“Much of the region will see at least some snow,” he said. “Much of area will see 6-plus inches of snow.”

The storm will start as all snow Wednesday night before it changes over to sleet, freezing rain and then all rain, especially along the coast.

The Canadian GEM model remains the most snowy, dropping 10-plus inches across much of the area as shown in pink./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com The Canadian GEM model remains the most snowy, dropping 10-plus inches across much of the area as shown in pink./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com Icing due to freezing rain is also a threat,” Szatkowski said. “Icing amounts over a tenth of an inch are possible where the freezing rain area sets up near the I-95 corridor.”

Minor coastal flooding is likely and moderate coastal flooding is possible with this storm along the Atlantic coast, as well as in the Delaware and Raritan Bays, Szatkowski said.

“The high tides to watch are both high tides on Thursday, as well as the morning high tide on Friday,” he said. “Significant rainfall along the coast may worsen the coastal flooding impacts.”

Szatkowski said the final call on this storm is far from set in stone, however. Updates will be posted through the day on Tuesday and Wednesday as two weather systems combine.

“Keep and eye on the forecast as small changes in storm track and/or intensity could result in a significant change in the impacts,” he said. “It’s been a stormy winter and it obviously hasn’t stopped yet.”

 


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