South Jersey remains under the gun for a winter storm

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The times and precipitation tracts have changed slightly overnight, but South Jersey and the Middle Atlantic States remain under target for a nor’easter that will deliver snow, rain and gusty winds, according to the National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center./NWS The times and precipitation tracts have changed slightly overnight, but South Jersey and the Middle Atlantic States remain under target for a nor’easter that will deliver snow, rain and gusty winds, according to the National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center./NWS The times and precipitation tracts have changed slightly overnight, but South Jersey and the Middle Atlantic States remain under target for a nor’easter that will deliver snow, rain and gusty winds, according to the National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center.

The winter storm warning for most of New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, Delaware and eastern Maryland begins at 7 p.m. this evening and lasts until 6 a.m. Friday morning when the coastal nor’easter will be approaching the New England states.

“Heavy snow, sleet and coastal flooding are all threats from this storm,” said Gary Szatkowski, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center. “Snowfall rates of 1 to 2 inches per hour are possible late tonight into Thursday morning.”

Snow to rain event

The storm is expected to begin as all snow around midnight and transition to rain Thursday morning as warmer air moves west off of the Atlantic Ocean, forecasters say. Rain could fall for most of the day on Thursday. However, some snow could form on the western side of the low as it pulls away Thursday evening and during the overnight hours leading into Friday.

The National Weather Service forecasts rain to be falling along the coast as warmer air moves in at 7 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 13./NWS The National Weather Service forecasts rain to be falling along the coast as warmer air moves in at 7 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 13./NWS Szatkowski warned that a slight change in the speed or path of the low could greatly increase or decrease snow totals. There will be sharp cutoffs as you go east or west of this storm's sweet spot which is expected to form along the I-95 corridor.

More than 10 inches of snow are expected where the heaviest bands set up, Szatkowski said. However, snow totals will fall off rapidly in destinations closer to the coast.

Portions of Atlantic County west of Route 50 could get 4-6 inches but areas along the immediate shore could get between a coating and an inch.

Areas near Lancaster, Allentown and the Pocono Mountains could get 12-18 inches of snow.

Strong winds

Strong winds are likely as the coastal nor’easter pulls away from the Middle Atlantic States on Thursday, Szatkowski said.
Winds could gust to 50 mph along the coast and from 20-25 mph inland.

Winds could be strong enough to take down power lines and tree limbs that are covered in heavy snow, he said.

Coastal flooding

Minor coastal flooding is likely along the Delaware and Raritan Bays, he said. Significant rainfall along the coast may worsen coastal flooding impact.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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