Winter storm update: Snowfall forecasts coming down

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While the Winter Storm Warning remains in place for South Jersey, weather models and leading forecasters are taming their snowfall predictions with less than 24 hours to go before the storm begins./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com While the Winter Storm Warning remains in place for South Jersey, weather models and leading forecasters are taming their snowfall predictions with less than 24 hours to go before the storm begins./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com While the winter storm warning remains in place for South Jersey, weather models and leading forecasters are taming their snowfall predictions with less than 24 hours to go before the storm begins.

AccuWeather, the Weather Channel, along with the National Weather Service, GFS, Canadian and North American Models are dropping their snowfall forecast totals from numbers posted on Saturday.

Weather forecasters say the storm will move through the area more quickly than previously thought and the bulk of the moisture will cross to the south of New Jersey. What’s good for South Jersey may not be so good for Delaware in this case.

This will still be a substantial snowstorm, forecasters say. Official snowfall totals taken at the Atlantic City International Airport in Egg Harbor Township could be the highest of the season as a result. The winter storm warning remains in effect until Monday evening.

However, if the models issued on Sunday, March 2 hold true, snowfall totals may end up being less than yesterday’s 10- to 14-inch forecast issued by the National Weather Service. Even the National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center lowered its snowfall forecast. In its Saturday forecast, the Mount Holly Forecast Center had predicted a South Jersey snowfall of 10-14 inches. However, the Forecast Center lowered those forecast totals to 8-10 inches during its forecast issued at 5 p.m. Sunday, March 2. While the Winter Storm Warning remains in place for South Jersey, weather models and leading forecasters are taming their snowfall predictions with less than 24 hours to go before the storm begins./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com While the Winter Storm Warning remains in place for South Jersey, weather models and leading forecasters are taming their snowfall predictions with less than 24 hours to go before the storm begins./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com For example, Accuweather has dropped its forecast from 10-14 inches of snow to a more manageable 4-8 inches.

The Weather Channel has dropped its forecast to 4-7 inches of snow.

The noon GFS run creates a 10-15 mile band of 7- to 9-inch snowfall across the western portions of Atlantic and Cumberland counties with much lesser amounts elsewhere.

The Canadian model moves the band into Cape May County instead with similar smowfall numbers.

The North American Model calls for about 7-9 inches across most of South Jersey.

However, the most-recent run of the European model keeps the South Jersey total in the 10- to 14-inch range.

Rain will begin today, Sunday, March 2 and change over to all snow as temperatures free fall from the 40s this afternoon to the 20s by tomorrow morning.

While the Winter Storm Warning remains in place for South Jersey, weather models and leading forecasters are taming their snowfall predictions with less than 24 hours to go before the storm begins./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com While the Winter Storm Warning remains in place for South Jersey, weather models and leading forecasters are taming their snowfall predictions with less than 24 hours to go before the storm begins./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com Snowfall will be its heaviest from about 7-9 a.m. through the afternoon hours. It will taper off in the early evening.

High temperatures will be very cold and range in the 20s on Monday afternoon, about 25 degrees colder than the South Jersey normal for March 3.


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