Figures don’t lie: Frigid February froze many

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If you are like many South Jersey residents who hate everything about the 2013-14 snow season, then you won’t be too terrible fond of the newest numbers put out by the Northeast Regional Climate Center./Northeast Climate Center If you are like many South Jersey residents who hate everything about the 2013-14 snow season, then you won’t be too terrible fond of the newest numbers put out by the Northeast Regional Climate Center./Northeast Climate Center If you are like many South Jersey residents who hate everything about the 2013-14 snow season, then you won’t be too terrible fond of the newest numbers put out by the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

In fact, the center’s February snowfall statistics may make you dislike this winter even more than you thought you did.

While most of us marvel like a child at the first flakes of snow each winter, almost all of us can’t wait to hear any hint of a last call on the winter of 2013-14.

And the most recent numbers published by the Northeast Regional Climate Center tell us what we already know but in a way that’s still hard to believe.

Though it’s been colder than normal and snowier than normal, no one would have predicted it would be this cold or this snowy back in December when the first winter forecasts started flying like snowflakes.

According to the Northeast Regional Climate Center, the winter of 2013-14 has been especially colder and snowier than normal.

If you are like many South Jersey residents who hate everything about the 2013-14 snow season, then you won’t be too terrible fond of the newest numbers put out by the Northeast Regional Climate Center./Northeast Climate Center If you are like many South Jersey residents who hate everything about the 2013-14 snow season, then you won’t be too terrible fond of the newest numbers put out by the Northeast Regional Climate Center./Northeast Climate Center February 2014 was brutal

And in February 2014 was surprisingly brutal. In a month when the days begin to get longer and the sun travels higher in the sky, temperatures retreated back to January levels across much of the Northeastern United States.

New Jersey residents faired well, enduring February temperatures that averaged about 4 degrees colder than normal, according to the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

But the majority of the Northeast was much colder than normal with temperatures that averaged 6 degrees or more colder than normal.

In western Pennsylvania, temperatures averaged 8 degrees colder than normal, according to the Northeast Regional Climate Center.

In Cleveland, temperatures averaged nearly 10 degrees colder than normal in February.

Snowfall totals across the Northeast have been especially high during the winter of 2013-14./Northeast Regional Climate Center Snowfall totals across the Northeast have been especially high during the winter of 2013-14./Northeast Regional Climate Center Much snowier than normal

With all of that cold air around, it seems natural that the 2013-14 would be one of the snowiest seasons in record.

Once again Atlantic and Cape May county residents have been somewhat fortunate during the winter of 2013-14, according to the Northeast Regional Climate Center. Atlantic and Cape May county snowfall totals had been about 12 inches above normal, not considering the March 3 snowstorm.

But areas immediately around the I-95 corridor from Philadelphia through New York have endured a seasonal snowfall that’s already 30 inches above normal and counting.

In fact, millions of people living in an area from Pittsburgh to New York to Hartford to Boston to Portland, Maine have struggled through a winter that has contained 18-30 inches more snow than normal, according to the Northeast Regional Climate Center figures.

When will it end?

Hidden behind the snowstorm forecasts this weekend was the fact that March 1 began the meteorological spring season.

Unfortunately, the weather seemed more like the depths of winter instead.


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