Last call for snow?

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Long-range forecast models say Ol’ Man winter might be rolling up his sleeves for one more round of heavy snow late next week before the curtain falls on the 2013-14 winter weather season, according to at least one-long range snow forecast through next weekend./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com Long-range forecast models say Ol’ Man winter might be rolling up his sleeves for one more round of heavy snow late next week before the curtain falls on the 2013-14 winter weather season, according to at least one-long range snow forecast through next weekend./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com Long-range forecast weather models say Ol’ Man Winter might be rolling up his sleeves for one more round of heavy snow late next week before the curtain falls on the 2013-2014 winter weather season.

Many had hoped that this weekend’s weak band of snow showers could signal the end for people living in the eastern portion of the Middle Atlantic States. However, we all may face one more trip to the home improvement store for even more rock salt later next week. Children might have yet another snow day as well.

Coastal low forms off the Middle Atlantic

East Coast temperatures will remain colder than normal thorugh the next 14 days, providing enough cold air to create a possible snow event./NWS East Coast temperatures will remain colder than normal thorugh the next 14 days, providing enough cold air to create a possible snow event./NWS According to the long-range European, Canadian and Global Forecast System weather models, a low-pressure system will move out of the Tennessee River Valley late next week. Then it will transfer its energy to a potent coastal low.

The current timeframe is Thursday into Friday, March 13-14.

And we all know the drill.

The storm bombs out off the coast. It winds up its energy and slings punishing amounts of snow back over those mainland residents who live hundreds of miles away.

While the both the European and Canadian weather models call for large amounts of snow, they also indicate those living south of Route 72 and east of Route 206 will be spared the bulk of Mother Nature’s wrath.

The GFS model positions a strong low pressure system of the Middle Atlantic late next week./GFS The GFS model positions a strong low pressure system of the Middle Atlantic late next week./GFS However, the long-range GFS model indicates the air could be cold enough for wrap-around moisture to fall as snow across New Jersey’s coastal regions.

Remember things can change, expecially 10 days out

Meteorologists say that no one can predict snowfall amounts more than a few days out.

We all learned that lesson on Monday when an approaching storm changed its delivery plans en route to the coast.

While Monday’s storm was predicted to be more of an I-95 culprit, it decided to become a South Jersey nightmare only about 10 hours before the flakes started falling.

Even then, Monday’s storm offered more surprises, sparing western parts of the state while stalling out over the coast to add insult to injury.

Western New Jersey residents breathed a sigh of relief at about 11:30 a.m. when the snow stopped. Meanwhile, some Cape May County residents stood in their driveways with one hand on an aching back and the other on a snow shovel. Helpless, they looked toward the sky and wondered, “When?”

Their prayers weren’t answered until hours later.

And if long-range forecasts are correct, many people who live across the Middle Atlantic States might look up and offer even more prayers to the weather gods again next week.


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