NWS: Saturday's warmth not to last

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Though spring begins during the afternoon of Thursday, March 20, weather forecasters warn we shouldn’t expect consistent spring-like temperatures for at least two or three weeks. In fact, the 60-degree temperatures we get on Saturday may only be tease because much colder temperatures will follow throughout the next work week./NWS Though spring begins during the afternoon of Thursday, March 20, weather forecasters warn we shouldn’t expect consistent spring-like temperatures for at least two or three weeks. In fact, the 60-degree temperatures we get on Saturday may only be tease because much colder temperatures will follow throughout the next work week./NWS Though spring begins during the afternoon of Thursday, March 20, weather forecasters warn we shouldn’t expect consistent spring-like temperatures for at least two or three weeks.

In fact, the 60-degree temperatures we get on Saturday may only be tease because much colder temperatures will follow throughout the next work week.

Here’s a look at a few extended temperature forecasts:

Up-and-down pattern continues

While the National Weather Service s predicting high temperatures in the low- to mid-60s for Saturday, March 22, its forecasters say we shouldn’t get too accustomed to warmer days.

While an up-and-down temperature pattern will continue for the foreseeable future, an overall pattern that favors colder-than-normal temperatures seems to be in place through April, forecasters say.

Until then, waves of cold impulses will make their way across the United States and send temperatures to below-normal levels for at least a few days at a time.

Through the first 20 days of March, South Jersey temperatures have averaged about 5.6 degrees colder than normal, according to the National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center.

Temperatures will cool down even more through the final days of March.

The Climate Prediction Center is forecasting greater chances of colder-than-normal tempreatures through the end of March./Climate Prediction Center The Climate Prediction Center is forecasting greater chances of colder-than-normal tempreatures through the end of March./Climate Prediction Center Climate Prediction Center outlook

The Climate Prediction Center paints the bleakest picture, posting an 8- to 14-day outlook that shows much of the Middle Atlantic, Great Lakes and New England states have a 60-80 percent chance of colder temperatures. Meanwhile, the Climate Prediction Center is forecasting odd for an above-normal amount of precipitation during the same time period.

NCEP CFS

The National Center for Environmental Prediction’s CFS model doesn’t forecast odds, but actually temperature outlooks.

Either way, the outlook is cold.

The NCEP is forecasting an outbreak of cold air – 7 to 15 degrees colder than normal – for next week over South Jersey and a good portion of the eastern United States.

Temperatures next week could average close to 15 degrees colder than normal, according to the National Center for Environmental Prediction./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com Temperatures next week could average close to 15 degrees colder than normal, according to the National Center for Environmental Prediction./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com Since the end of March should bring daily high temperatures in the upper-50s to South Jersey, the NCEP’s outlook keeps daytime highs in the 40s.

April outlook

NCEP’s month-long outlook for April isn’t much better if you are hoping to get a jump start on your summer fun.

According to the NCEP, temperatures in April could average 2-5 degrees colder than normal for areas of the Midwest, Great Lakes, Middle Atlantic and New England states.

The most recent outlook for April paints a colder-than-normal forecast for most of the Eastern United States./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com The most recent outlook for April paints a colder-than-normal forecast for most of the Eastern United States./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com

 

 


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