Total lunar eclipse April 15

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A heavenly treat awaits those who finish their taxes early this year, NASA says. We aren’t talking about eternal salvation. No. Instead, you’ll have much more time to glance up toward the sky and view the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses./NASA A heavenly treat awaits those who finish their taxes early this year, NASA says. We aren’t talking about eternal salvation. No. Instead, you’ll have much more time to glance up toward the sky and view the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses./NASA

A heavenly treat awaits those who finish their taxes early this year, NASA says.

We aren’t talking about eternal salvation. No. Instead, you’ll have much more time to glance up toward the sky and view the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses.

My kingdom for a tetrad

Total lunar eclipses aren’t rare. Consider them like rolling a strike in bowling. But four consecutive eclipses – like rolling four strikes in a row – is very unusual, NASA says.

In fact, a lunar four-in-a-row happens only about eight times in a century. The last tetrad – which is what NASA calls it – happened in 2004. And the next will occur in 2032-33.

Paying taxes, by the way, happens every year.

April 15 lunar eclipse basics

For those who are too young to know and for those who are old enough to forget, here are a few lunar eclipse basics:

During a lunar eclipse, the moon follows a path that takes it through the earth’s shadow. So a normally bright white moon turns to a reddish hue. Lunar eclipses are safe to watch without eye protection, unlike solar eclipses.

April 15 lunar eclipse timing

Since you should have your taxes finished, you’ll be able to set your nightstand alarm clock to get a front-yard seat for this out-of-the-world show. The partial eclipse phase begins at 1:57 a.m. as the moon creeps into the Earth’s shadow.

The total eclipse begins at 3:08 a.m. and should last to 4:26 a.m., NASA says.

The second partial eclipse phase ends at 5:34 a.m. when the moon exits the earth’s shadow.

Totality lasts about 78 minutes, according to NASA.

April 15 lunar eclipse neighbors

While you are watching the lunar eclipse, you could take a look at Spica, a star in the constellation Virgo. Mars will be the bright reddish object to the right of the moon.


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