March was the fourth-warmest everywhere but South Jersey

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While South Jersey residents struggled through three snowstorms in March, the rest of the world baked…literally./NCDC While South Jersey residents struggled through three snowstorms in March, the rest of the world baked…literally./NCDC While South Jersey residents struggled through three snowstorms in March, the rest of the world baked – literally. Global March 2014 temperatures were their fourth highest ever for the month, according to the National Climate Data Center. The NCDC released its monthly findings earlier this week, and some of the results are surprising.

Here are some of the main findings:

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces was the fourth highest for March on record, at 0.71 degrees Celsius (1.28 degrees Fahrenheit) above the 20th century average of 12.3 C (54.1 F).

The global land surface temperature was 1.33 C (2.39 F) above the 20th century average of 5.0 C (40.8 F), the fifth-highest for March on record. For the ocean, the March global sea surface temperature was 0.48 C (0.86 F) above the 20th century average of 15.9 C (60.7 F), tying with 2004 as the fifth-highest for March on record.

The combined global land and ocean average surface temperature for the January–March period (year to date) was 0.60 C (1.08 F) above the 20th century average of 12.3 C (54.1 F), the seventh-warmest such period on record.

Meanwhile, temperatures in March ranged about 5 degrees colder than normal in South Jersey, according to the National Weather Service Mount Holly Forecast Center.

 


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