National Climate Assessment: Humans affecting Climate Change

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On Tuesday, May 6, the White House released its Third National Climate Assessment, This assessment is the most comprehensive and authoritative scientific report ever generated about current climate changes and expected changes in the future. On Tuesday, May 6, the White House released its Third National Climate Assessment, This assessment is the most comprehensive and authoritative scientific report ever generated about current climate changes and expected changes in the future. On Tuesday, May 6, the White House released its Third National Climate Assessment, This assessment is the most comprehensive and authoritative scientific report ever generated about current climate changes and expected changes in the future.

More than 115 NOAA experts and scientists contributed to the groundbreaking United States Climate Report.

The report offers a number of findings, including:

Climate change is affecting Americans in every region of the United States and key sectors of the nation's economy.

The global warming of the past 50 years is primarily due to human activities, predominantly the burning of fossil fuels.

Human-induced climate change is projected to continue, and it will accelerate significantly if global emissions of heat-trapping gasses continue to increase.

Some extreme weather and climate events have increased in recent decades, and new and stronger evidence confirms that some of these increases are related to human activities.

Climate change threatens human health and well-being in many ways, including through more extreme weather events and wildfire, decreased air quality, and diseases transmitted by insects, food and water.

See the full report here


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