Climate warming report: New Jersey to get the worst impact

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Some of worst impacts created by climate warming are likely to be felt along the New Jersey coast and across the South Jersey mainland, according to the third annual National Climate Assessment issued Tuesday, May 6. Some of worst impacts created by climate warming are likely to be felt along the New Jersey coast and across the South Jersey mainland, according to the third annual National Climate Assessment issued Tuesday, May 6. Some of worst impacts created by climate warming are likely to be felt along the New Jersey coast and across the South Jersey mainland, according to the third annual National Climate Assessment issued Tuesday, May 6.

The report blamed rising temperatures, and increased rate of significant dangerous events along with a quickening pace of sea level rise as the main reasons why South Jersey residents will experience the worst effects of climate change.

In short, storms that created flooding damage like Hurricane Irene and Hurricane Sandy  will become more common, the Climate Assessment said.

Climate Assessment: Sea level rise

The South Jersey coastal regions along the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay are like to experience a sea level rise of 1-2 feet per century according to the Climate Assessment. This will greatly increase the area’s susceptibility to flooding during times of high tide. The will be much greater chances of coastal flooding during nor’easters and hurricanes as well.

According to the Climate Assessment, the observed sea level rise has been 1.2 feet over the last Century at Philadelphia, Pa. and about eight inches more than the global average.

 Climate Assessment: rising temperatures

Between 1895 and 2011, temperatures in the Northeast increased by almost 2˚F (0.16˚F per decade), and precipitation in­creased by approximately five inches, or more than 10 percent (0.4 inches per decade).

The South Jersey mainland could experience summertime temperatures above 90 degrees on 70  or more days by 2100, according to the Climate Assessment.

Climate Assessment: extreme events

The Northeast has experienced a greater recent increase in ex­treme precipitation than any other region in the United States, according to the Climate Assessment. Between 1958 and 2010, the Northeast saw more than a 70 percent increase in the amount of precipitation falling in very heavy events as defined as the heaviest 1 percent of all daily events.

 


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