Globally speaking, 2014 trying to become the hottest year on record

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Though residents living in the Northeast, Middle Atlantic, Great Lakes and Upper Midwest wouldn’t know it, 2014 temperatures are proceeding at such a hot pace that this year could be the warmest on record, says Climate Center’s Andrea Thompson./Climate Central Though residents living in the Northeast, Middle Atlantic, Great Lakes and Upper Midwest wouldn’t know it, 2014 temperatures are proceeding at such a hot pace that this year could be the warmest on record, says Climate Center’s Andrea Thompson./Climate Central Though residents living in the Northeast, Middle Atlantic, Great Lakes and Upper Midwest wouldn’t know it, 2014 temperatures are proceeding at such a hot pace that this year could be the warmest on record, says Climate Center’s Andrea Thompson.

In a post filed, Monday, June 23, Thompson writes that the upcoming El Nino could be what pushes 2014 over the brink and into record territory.

There is good reason for hoping 2014 will be a record-breaker, Thompson said.

For 351 months – that’s 29 years and counting – monthly global temperatures have been warmer than normal, she said.

Worldwide, May 2014 was 1.33 degrees F warmer than the 20th century average, according to figures just released by the national Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The warmest year on record wasn’t too far ago – 2010.

El Nino conditions kept 2011 and 2012 out of record territory. However, those years were warmer than their 20th Century averages, she said.

Depending how warm the upcoming El Nino pans out, 2014 could be a short-lived record-breaker, said Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientists with the NationalCenter for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo.

He suggests that 2015 could be warm enough to set yet another global temperature record even if 2014 pulls down a record.

 

 


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