Risky Business climate risk assessment: Atlantic City ocean levels could rise 4.5 feet

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Atlantic Ocean water levels near Atlantic City could rise by as much as 4.5 feet over current levels according to a national report issued Tuesday, June 24 by an organization chaired by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg./Risky Business Atlantic Ocean water levels near Atlantic City could rise by as much as 4.5 feet over current levels according to a national report issued Tuesday, June 24 by an organization chaired by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg./Risky Business Atlantic Ocean water levels near Atlantic City could rise by as much as 4.5 feet over current levels according to a national report issued Tuesday, June 24 by an organization chaired by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

The 56-page report, “Risky Business, the Economic Risks of Climate Change in the United States,” examined current trends, and assessed the economic impacts caused by global warming and climate change.

While the rest of the country will be concerned with increases in extreme weather and the annual number of 95-degree days, Atlantic City, South Jersey and the coastal Middle Atlantic States will be most worried above sea level rises during the next century because of climate change

“It’s likely that Atlantic City will see 2.4 to 4.5 feet of sea level rise by the end of the century,” the report said.

Because of sea level rise and an increase in coastal storms, coastal Northeast and Middle Atlantic communities could suffer a 300-percent increase in damage costs by the end of the century, the report said.

That’s harsh news for an Atlantic Coastal area that is still struggling to rebound from damages caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012

Risky Business: Other Findings

The annual number of 95 degree days for the average American could increase to a number between 45 and 96 days, the report said.

By the end of the century, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho could well have more days above 95°F each year than there are currently in Texas.

It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity

“What matters isn’t just the heat, it’s the humidity—or, in this case, a dangerous combination of the two,” the report said. “One of the most striking findings in our analysis is that increas­ing heat and humidity in some parts of the country could lead to outside conditions that are literally unbearable to humans, who must maintain a skin temperature below 95°F in order to effectively cool down and avoid fatal heat stroke. The U.S. has never yet seen a day exceeding this threshold on what we call the “Humid Heat Stroke Index,” but if we continue on our current climate path, this will change, with residents in the eastern half of the U.S. ex­periencing one such day a year on average by century’s end and nearly 13 such days per year into the next century.”

To see the full report, “Risky Business, the Economic Risks of Climate Change,” click here.

 

 

 

 

 


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