Polar vortex or not, a major cool down is on its way

Attention: open in a new window. PrintE-mail

While the media and weather forecasters butt heads on what to call an impending major cool down, one fact is certain: It is coming and it is real./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com While the media and weather forecasters butt heads on what to call an impending major cool down, one fact is certain: It is coming and it is real./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com While the media and weather forecasters butt heads on what to call an impending major cool down, one fact is certain: It is coming and it is real.

See maps showing how cold it will get by reading more.

You say polar vortex, I say cool down

While media writers are naming it a polar vortex and weather forecasters are just calling it a cool down, parts of the Upper Midwest will enjoy daily high temperatures nearly 20 degrees colder than normal this week.

Before the cool down is over, it could moderate a little and spread all the way to the Atlantic Ocean.

As a result, temperature temperatures in the big cities of Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia, New York and Boston could be anywhere from 5-10 degrees below normal for the next week or so.

Let me ask, “Who is complaining anyways?”

National Weather Service: It’s a cool down, not a polar vortex

A polar vortex is a stratospheric event, taking place way up there in the upper reaches of the atmosphere, between 7 and 31 miles.

This week’s cool down is a marriage of two weather systems located in the troposphere, the lowest level of the atmosphere between the ground and 7 miles.

So while the resulting temperature drop may be the same, the names are different. It’s not a polar vortex, really. It just feels like one.

Polar vortex or not, how cold will it get?

Warm air will move in from the west and push some of the colder-than-normal air to the south by around July 20./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com Warm air will move in from the west and push some of the colder-than-normal air to the south by around July 20./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com The initial cold outbreak is this week, when temperatures will average about 20 degrees colder than normal across portions of the Midwest. So instead of the mercury targeting the upper 80s to lower 90s, our digital thermometers will settle into the upper 60s to lower 70s for a few days.

While it’s definitely a cool down, it’s not polar, and definitely not a polar vortex. Most people will rejoice by being able to turn off their air conditioning for a few days. However, no one will be turning on the switch to light up their heaters, just yet.

When does it end?

A return to weather normalcy begins by about July 20 when warmer-than-normal temperatures could return for a few days over much of the country, according to long-range temperature forecasts.

However, a large area of cooler than normal temperatures returns around Aug. 1 to form over the Canadian prairies. It’s going to provide real football weather for fans of the Saskatchewan Roughriders, Winnipeg Blue Bombers and Edmonton Eskimos.

Once again, however, the cold air isn’t going to stay up north.

A second batch of colder-than-normal temperatures forms over Canada around Aug. 1 and could give a chilly start to the last month of summer for many parts of the United States./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com A second batch of colder-than-normal temperatures forms over Canada around Aug. 1 and could give a chilly start to the last month of summer for many parts of the United States./Weatherbell Analytics, www.weatherbell.com The second dome of cold weather is forecast to move into the Upper Midwest, upper mid-Atlantic and the New England states during the first 10 days of August. This so-called arctic invasion won’t make it as far south, however.

South burns again

For those who enjoy the heat, temperatures in the Southwest and Southeast will remain above normal while the rest of the United States enjoys a mid-summer cool down for a few days.

Just don’t say, polar vortex.

Weather triva:

Find out when 17 tornadoes devastated portions of five Northeast States and when molasses caused a river of sweet terror in Boston by clicking here: Shore News Weather Trivia

Keep informed

As they say in the weather world, conditions change so check back often.

Like us on Facebook by clicking on Shore Weather Today

Ready for a heat wave: Do you know when South Jersey's warmest days are?

 


blog comments powered by Disqus