South Jersey residents wonder where the heat is

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While the current cool break from normally oppressive mid-July temperatures may be a pleasant surprise for some, today’s chilly start to the day made others wonder where the heat was. Well, go west young man, or young woman./NOAA While the current cool break from normally oppressive mid-July temperatures may be a pleasant surprise for some, today’s chilly start to the day made others wonder where the heat was. Well, go west young man, or young woman./NOAA While the current cool break from normally oppressive mid-July temperatures may be a pleasant surprise for some, today’s chilly start to the day made others wonder where the heat was. Well, go west young man, or young woman. See where others have baked in temperature extremes while East Coast residents have endured a nine-month chill:

 Global warming stops for a while

While millions continue to debate the cause and the actual existence of global warming and climate change, East Coast residents have been stuck in a nine-month stretch of cooler, colder and near normal temperatures.

No where was it more apparent than in South Jersey which posted below-normal temperatures from late last year through April 2014. Then May came in above normal, albeit by only about 1 degree.

June was a statistical washout. The daily highs were higher. However, the daily lows were lower. When all of the numbers were combined, juggled and sorted out, the month was average.

Where is the heat?

While the East Coast has chilled, the west baked during the first half of 2014./NOAA While the East Coast has chilled, the west baked during the first half of 2014./NOAA California just completed its hottest first half-year on record, according to  NOAA’s National Climate Overview for June. No other January-June time period has been hotter in California since 1895, when temperature record-keeping began.

But California wasn’t just a little hotter than normal. We aren’t talking a half-a-degree or so. The average six-month temperature in California was 4.8 degrees warmer than normal and a whopping 1.1 degrees warmer than the previous record.

To make matters worse, 36.5 percent of the California was in an exceptional drought.

But California wasn’t alone in enjoying much hotter-than-normal temperatures.

Other western states enjoying some of their warmest first-half year temperatures in the past 120 years included: Oregon (114,) Nevada (116), Arizona (119), New Mexico (110), and Utah (113).

Meanwhile, the east chilled, literally

The temperature in New York’s Central Park didn’t reach 90 degrees until July 2, the fourth-latest date for the first 90-degree day in the city’s history.

A relatively wet, cloudy June moderated temperatures in the mid-South, resulting in cooler daytime temperatures.

Some of the coolest first half-year temperature rankings were in Pennsylvania (13), Ohio (15), Wisconsin (6), Louisiana (6), Arkansas (7), New Jersey (43), West Virginia (26), New York (31), and Mississippi (8).

Relief could be on the way

While long-range weather forecasting models indicate temperatures could be warming up for a brief period late next week. A batch of much hotter-than-normal air is going to climb out of the Southwest, settle over the Midwest and drop in on the East Coast late next week. As a result, another three-day heat wave could reach the Jersey Shore by July 25-28.

However, cooler air will follow, making early August temperatures seem more like the beginning of September.

For interesting weather trivia, check out Shore News Today weather trivia.

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Ready for a heat wave: Do you know when South Jersey's warmest days are?

 

 

 

 

 

 

California just finished the hottest first half year on record, a period going back 120 years, according to the national climate overview for June released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

 

 


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