Tropical Depression No. 2 forms, but heads toward a rough and tumble neighborhood

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Though it looks healthy, hurricane forecasters say Tropical Depression No. 2 is walking into a backstreet full of meteorological thugs and bullies that could leave it fighting for its life./NHC Though it looks healthy, hurricane forecasters say Tropical Depression No. 2 is walking into a backstreet full of meteorological thugs and bullies that could leave it fighting for its life./NHC Though it looks healthy, hurricane forecasters say Tropical Depression No. 2 is walking into a backstreet full of meteorological thugs and bullies that could leave it fighting for its life.

See what chances Tropical Depression has in growing by clicking here:

Atlantic Ocean Depression No. 2 forms

The National Hurricane Center announced at 11 a.m. Monday, July 21 that its forecasters were watching a low pressure system for possible development.

Through the day, conditions improved and Tropical Depression No. 2 formed late Monday evening.

Tropical Depression No. 2: Life is rough on the streets

But the road ahead for Tropical Depression No. 2 is full of enemies.

As of 8 a.m., Tuesday, No. 2 had sustained winds of 35 mph and moving west at 16 mph. Tropical Depression No. 2 was located in the middle Atlantic but moving into July’s hurricane valley where many storms like to form.

But then the National Hurricane Center issued a warning on Tuesday.

“As previous advisories have noted, the environment ahead of the depression does not favor strengthening,” the National Hurricane Center said.

That’s the National Hurricane Center’s way of saying Tropical Depression No. 2 features no way of getting out out of the trouble it is headed toward.

Just like the way storms suffered during the hurricane-starved season of 2013, Depression No. 2 appears headed into a pocket of dry air. This pocket will starve Depression No. 2 of all of the vital moisture it needs for development.

Providing the second of a one-two knockout punch combination, wind shear is expected to knock of the top of the thunderstorms circling around Depression No. 2.

All of this goes down in the next day or two, according to the National Hurricane Center.

“And all of the dynamical models show the system becoming a trough of low pressure by the time it reaches the Lesser Antilles,” the National Hurricane Center said.

The death knell should sound on Thursday or Friday when the National Hurricane Center predicts Depression No. 2 will dissipate and calm the feares of residents along the eastern seaboard of the United States.

Learn more, click on: Tropical storm No. 2 forms, heads for rough neighborhood

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