• Holiday

    Father Christmas will visit Whale’s Tale on Dec. 13 from 1 to 4 p.m. at 312 Washington Mall in Cape May. An old-fashioned Christmas exhibit

    The public is invited to a free exhibit of holiday traditions through the years complete with model trains, toys and more at the Carriage House Gallery, Emlen Physick Estate, 1048 Washington St., Cape May, through Thursday, Jan. 1. The gallery is open daily, though hours vary. For more information, call 609-884-5404…

  • Middle Township Gazette

    NORTH WILDWOOD – A Woodbine woman is in custody, accused of burglarizing the same North Wildwood home on 24th Avenue twice.

    Lelani M. Freeman, 30, Woodbine, was charged by North Wildwood police, who said the incidents happened between November and December. Police have accused her of stealing pills and an electronic benefit card. According to police,  she knew the victim.

  • Cape May Gazette

    LOWER TOWNSHIP – The Lower Township Police Department and the Cape May County Regional SWAT Team responded to a home in Lower Township Tuesday after a man fired a gun and his wife and children fled.

    Jeffrey Hart, 47, barricaded himself in his home on the 600 block of Jonathan Hoffman Road before police arrived, according to a press release from Cape May County Prosecutor Robert L. Taylor.

  • Wildwood Leader

    The Grinch looks out from the back of a Wildwood police car after being “pinched” at the Grinch run.
WILDWOOD – He’s green and mean with a mile-long rap sheet. But in Wildwood, the Grinch was given a one-way ticket back to Whoville – courtesy of the Wildwood police department.

    Sponsored by the Wildwood police department, the Dec. 13 Pinch the Grinch 5K Run and 1 Mile Fun Walk offered athletes a chance to make their…

  • Upper Township Gazette

    STRATHMERE – The Strathmere Zip Code is one of the richest in the United States, according to the Movoto real estate blog.

    Sea Isle City is one of the most dangerous cities in the state, says the ValuePenguin website.

    It is a tale of two cities, at least according to these websites, for the two communities on Ludlam Island.

  • Sports

    When Alison Mastrangelo was young, she was a huge fan of ABC’s World News Tonight.

    “I always had the biggest crush on (anchor) Peter Jennings,” she said with a laugh. “My mom (Fran) always says whenever they’d turn on the TV and it was on that I’d stop everything I was doing to watch him.”

Wildwood Leader

Football gathering is an annual tradition

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Written by Joyce Gould Tuesday, December 28, 2010 02:25 pm

Middle Township Chief Chris Leusner with Anne Trivelis and her dad and host Tony Trivelis. Middle Township Chief Chris Leusner with Anne Trivelis and her dad and host Tony Trivelis.

It is an annual tradition: Watching football at Tony and Val Trivelis’ home. They are the owners of Schellenger’s Restaurant. It is the last night or late afternoon game of the regular season for the Eagles vs. whomever. This time is was the Cowboys, the team everyone loves to hate.

The house is filled to the brim with friends, family and food. Food like you have never seen before -- shrimp , clams casino, oysters plain and Rockefeller, sliced tenderloin, smoked salmon, wings, ribs, and his fabulous lasagna. Tony loves to cook but he has a terrific chef Glenn Dunleavy who has been with the Trivelis family for years, and is like part of the family.

Oh, of course there was plenty to drink. In fact, anything you wanted.

People come from several states to this party and they are never disappointed. Lou Intracasco a former motel owner came from Bergen County, several relatives from Philadelphia, were there and many Wildwoodians. Joe Gallagher was there. He will retire in a few months after being the tax assessor for Wildwood for many years.

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In another time > Film star kept his connection to Wildwoods

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Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Tuesday, December 28, 2010 02:23 pm

Choose a period when the Wildwoods were the most colorful and exciting in their long history and the chances are that the decades of the 1950s and 1960s would win in a landslide.

Some arguments could be made, of course, for the Roaring ’20s, when flappers danced the Charleston and bootleggers smuggled illegal liquor onto the island from mother ships offshore, or for the arrival of the first railroad here and the tourists who came with it, or for all the recall elections that seemed to be an added amusement when life grew dull on the island.

But they could hardly be compared to the ’50s and ’60s, when the stars came out at night and they were not all celestial. It was a time when one big war had ended, a shorter one was to start, then end before the longest one in American history was to drag on in heated controversy.

But on the island of Five Mile Beach, hardly immune to the world beyond its waters, nightclubs began to appear and they starred entertainers whose names had the aura of stardom, names such as Liberace, Jerry Lewis, Ella Fitzgerald, Johnny Mathis, Louis Armstrong, Red Buttons, Peggy Lee and Tony Bennett.

And on and on they came to Wildwood, so many, so often that booking agents in the 1950s and for some time thereafter were looking upon Wildwood as a “Little Las Vegas” without the slot machines or roulettes or dice tables.

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In another time > Rock ‘n’ roll comes to Wildwood

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Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Friday, December 17, 2010 01:32 pm

When big bands began to disappear from the music scene in the 1950s, along came something called rock ‘n’ roll, a far cry from the jitterbug music of Benny Goodman and the waltzing of Lawrence Welk.

In this new craze, no longer did the conservative old-fashioned music lovers complain about dancers snuggling each other publicly while in motion. But although the dancers were “decently separated” now, some onlookers were shocked by the body gyrations they watched while the dancers were separated. For sure, this was not Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire.

Where rock ‘n’ roll originated has been a matter of conjecture for some time. One theory is that a Cleveland disc jockey named Alan Freed initiated the term when he took it from a song with a title that was not exactly written by Victor Herbert or Jerome Kern. It was called “My Baby Rocks Me With a Steady Roll.”

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In another time > Trough it all, the music kept playing

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Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Monday, December 13, 2010 02:50 pm

The turn of the centuries from the 19th to the 20th bode well for the Wildwoods. They hadn’t quite reached the status of Cape May to the south or Atlantic City to the north, but there were signs that sooner or not too much later the four Wildwood municipalities would be viable seashore resorts for visitors or year-round residents.

The signs of progress were there and the word was getting around to take a look at Wildwood for your next vacation place or to speculate on property dealings there.

After all, President Benjamin Harrison brought some credibility to the island when he took the time to visit Five Mile Beach and participate in the dedication of the resort’s prestigious Hotel Dayton in 1890.

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Five Mile Beat > Big turnout for a cold day in NYC

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Written by Joyce Gould Monday, December 13, 2010 01:19 pm

Joe and Tracey DuFault Joe and Tracey DuFault

On Wednesday, Dec. 8, 90 people dressed for a cold winter day braved the elements as  the Greater Wildwood Chamber of Commerce held its annual bus and theater trip to New York City.

The play was “The Addams Family” starring Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth, and a superb cast to back up the stars of the show. The play is based on the works of cartoonist Charles Addams, which had also been adapted into movies and a popular 1960s television show.

The tickets for this show were ordered over 18 months ago knowing that Nathan Lane was to be the star.  We were not disappointed. Members of the chamber came and Denise Haley from North Wildwood brought along her granddaughter McKenna Melloy to see the play.

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Five mile beat > The Wildwoods kick off the season

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Written by Joyce Gould Tuesday, December 07, 2010 10:39 am

Daisy Troop 42540 of North Wildwood finishing the parade. Daisy Troop 42540 of North Wildwood finishing the parade.

The Wildwoods Convention Center did a wonderful job sponsoring the 2010 Family Holiday Celebration on Friday, Dec. 3 and Saturday, Dec. 4.

Friday night was the Christmas parade that began in North Wildwood and traveled through Wildwood and the Crest before returning to the Convention center. The parade was huge. Jodie Di Eduardo from the Jaycees and chairperson of the event was thrilled with the turnout for the event since last year it was not that well attended.

Fire truck after fire truck went down Pacific Avenue. The West Cape May Fire Company took first place for most  original, Rio Grande Fire Company first place best illuminated and Townbank Volunteer Fire Company won for best comedy. They did Thomas the Tank Engine. Best overall fire company was Ocean View and the best overall went to the city of Wildwood.

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In another time > Movers and shakers in the early days

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Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Monday, December 06, 2010 04:25 pm

Anyone researching the long and colorful history of the Wildwoods will usually find the names of the three Baker brothers, as well as Dr. Margaret Mace and movie house entrepreneur William Hunt. They are cited among the prime movers and shakers who shaped the future of the island.

But there were others, perhaps not as famous, who did their part in developing, expanding and sometimes settling on the island they fell in love with or had a financial interest for being there.

Like Henry Ottens, for instance.

Ottens has been described variously as a philanthropist, a wealthy land owner and a community activist and he lived the part of each after he came to the seashore in 1898, like others, for relaxation. He liked what he saw in the young Wildwoods, especially what was then known as Anglesea, and that set him off and running on big new projects.

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In another time > Hot times at the Starlight, but the fire was hotter

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Written by Jacob Schaad Jr. Tuesday, November 30, 2010 02:10 pm

Before, during and just after World War II, Hunt’s Starlight Ballroom was a big attraction on the Wildwood boardwalk, as popular as the Steel Pier was a favorite in Atlantic City.

Visitors at the Starlight danced away happy hours, sometimes leading to romance and marriage, while the live music of such big bands as Glenn Miller, Woody Herman, Charlie Spivak and Vaughn Monroe played on into starry nights, cooled by ocean breezes. Tex Beneke, in later life to front the West Coast version of the reborn Glenn Miller band, broadcast in 1948 from the Starlight to an estimated 60 million radio listeners.

Some, now gray haired and walking gingerly, recall their first kisses at the Starlight where people dressed, if not elegantly, at least in more formal attire than one might see at today’s discos. One of the slogans bantered about then by the young and single was “we dressed to impress” as they sought companionship on and off the ballroom floor. And if you didn’t dance, the odds were that you didn’t romance, either .Nobody wanted a “wallflower” who just sat on the sidelines and watched.

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