• Stewart Farrell

Stewart Farrell, PhD, director the Richard Stockton Coastal Research Center in Port Republic, provided the following commentary on what the March 1962 storm means to us today as it relates to the subject of shore protection.

  • SUBMISSION

I was 24 at the time of the storm, living in Atlantic City with my husband and daughter. We lived at the corner of Atlantic and Maine avenues in a big white apartment building in a middle section. My husband was a commercial fisherman. He was the captain, and he was supposed to go out the ni…

  • R.J. LIBERATORE Jr.

EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP – The next time a storm like the Ash Wednesday Storm of 1962 takes aim at South Jersey, the winds may howl and dangerous waters may rise with each high tide, but there will be something different about the way the storm impacts the coast.

  • MARJORIE PRESTON

BRIGANTINE – Thirteenth Street is the last street on the northernmost tip of the island, only a block long between beach and bayfront. When the storm of ’62 hit, the bay and the ocean met on the narrow thoroughfare, according to Brigantine native Verna Cherry, who now lives in Galloway.

  • SUBMISSION

I was 20 at the time of the storm and living in Pleasantville. I was a newlywed with my husband, George. We were married in January, and the storm was in March. We were living in Glendale Manor Apartments.

  • Submission

We had been living in Avalon for about two years at the time, having moved here from Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1960. At the time of the storm I was 12. My dad was a painting contractor who was known in the community for his cooking.

  • Submission

The apartment building at 100 South Providence Ave. in Atlantic City, constructed by my great-grandparents in 1916, endured its first brush with Mother Nature during the March 1962 storm.

  • SUBMISSION

I moved to the United States in January of ’61 to Brooklyn from Sorrento, Italy. I was 21 at the time, and I took the bus down to Atlantic City in October of ’61. The storm happened in March.

  • Submission

I was 6 years old with the measles; the curtains were pulled down in those days, so I was unable at first to look out the window. We lived in the Venice Park section of Atlantic City on Madison Avenue, two blocks from the bay. Well, not that day.

  • Submission

We tried to keep everything as normal as possible. My husband and I had friends over to play cards. They were interesting friends from the Jolly Roger – it was Johnny and Ramona Moore. The winds came up, and the lights were flicking on and off. As we were playing, we were concerned that the …

  • Stewart Farrell

Stewart Farrell, PhD, director the Richard Stockton Coastal Research Center in Port Republic, provided the following commentary on what the March 1962 storm means to us today as it relates to the subject of shore protection.

  • SUBMISSION

I was 24 at the time of the storm, living in Atlantic City with my husband and daughter. We lived at the corner of Atlantic and Maine avenues in a big white apartment building in a middle section. My husband was a commercial fisherman. He was the captain, and he was supposed to go out the ni…

  • R.J. LIBERATORE Jr.

EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP – The next time a storm like the Ash Wednesday Storm of 1962 takes aim at South Jersey, the winds may howl and dangerous waters may rise with each high tide, but there will be something different about the way the storm impacts the coast.

  • MARJORIE PRESTON

BRIGANTINE – Thirteenth Street is the last street on the northernmost tip of the island, only a block long between beach and bayfront. When the storm of ’62 hit, the bay and the ocean met on the narrow thoroughfare, according to Brigantine native Verna Cherry, who now lives in Galloway.

When we let the public know a few weeks ago that we were putting together some special coverage commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Great Atlantic Storm of 1962, we were hoping to get enough material to fill a page or two.

  • SUBMISSION

I was 20 at the time of the storm and living in Pleasantville. I was a newlywed with my husband, George. We were married in January, and the storm was in March. We were living in Glendale Manor Apartments.

  • Submission

We had been living in Avalon for about two years at the time, having moved here from Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1960. At the time of the storm I was 12. My dad was a painting contractor who was known in the community for his cooking.

  • Submission

The apartment building at 100 South Providence Ave. in Atlantic City, constructed by my great-grandparents in 1916, endured its first brush with Mother Nature during the March 1962 storm.

  • SUBMISSION

I moved to the United States in January of ’61 to Brooklyn from Sorrento, Italy. I was 21 at the time, and I took the bus down to Atlantic City in October of ’61. The storm happened in March.

  • Submission

I was 6 years old with the measles; the curtains were pulled down in those days, so I was unable at first to look out the window. We lived in the Venice Park section of Atlantic City on Madison Avenue, two blocks from the bay. Well, not that day.

  • Submission

We tried to keep everything as normal as possible. My husband and I had friends over to play cards. They were interesting friends from the Jolly Roger – it was Johnny and Ramona Moore. The winds came up, and the lights were flicking on and off. As we were playing, we were concerned that the …

  • JAMES FITZPATRICK

PORT REPUBLIC – If the Great Atlantic Storm of 1962 were to put in a repeat performance in 2012, experts say the resulting damage would likely be far less severe because of the work being done on the frontlines of shore protection.